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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

U.S. Measles Cases Reach 125, Surpassing Recent Peak in 2022

U.S. Measles Cases Reach 125, Surpassing Recent Peak in 2022

Measles infections continue to spread across the country, with 125 cases now reported in 18 states, new U.S. government data shows.

That is more cases than were reported in all of 2022, the most recent annual peak for measles infections, the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.

So far this ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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Parents, Coaches: Help Young Athletes Avoid Summer Heat Hazards

Parents, Coaches: Help Young Athletes Avoid Summer Heat Hazards

Another broiling summer looms, along with another season of kids' summer sports.

It's a potentially harmful, even lethal combination. But experts at Nationwide Children's Hospital (NCH) have advice for kids, parents and coaches on how to keep young athletes safe when thermometers rise.

Each year, an estimated 240 people die from hea...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2024
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Hoping to Conceive? Experts Offer Tips to Better Female Fertility

Hoping to Conceive? Experts Offer Tips to Better Female Fertility

Women hoping to get pregnant sometimes wonder if there’s anything they can do to make it easier to conceive.

Those questions might take on an added edge if a couple has been having unprotected sex for at least a year with no success, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There are medical issues that affect the ability to become pregnant, ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Stigma, Shame Hit Many Gay Men Affected by Mpox Outbreak

Stigma, Shame Hit Many Gay Men Affected by Mpox Outbreak

A British study finds that beyond the physical pain and turmoil of an mpox diagnosis, many of the mostly gay and bisexual men infected during the 2022 outbreak faced stigma, homophobia and shame.

Mpox is spread largely through skin-to-skin contact, and the outbreak in Europe and the United States was largely localized to men who have sex ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Calories, Not Meal Timing, Key to Weight Loss: Study

Calories, Not Meal Timing, Key to Weight Loss: Study

A head-to-head trial of obese, pre-diabetic people who ate the same amount of daily calories -- with one group following a fasting schedule and the other eating freely -- found no difference in weight loss or other health indicators.

So, despite the fact that fasting diets are all the rage, if you simply cut your daily caloric intake, weig...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Dietary Changes May Beat Meds in Treating IBS

Dietary Changes May Beat Meds in Treating IBS

The right diet may be the best medicine for easing the painful symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), new research shows.

In the study, two different eating plans beat standard medications in treating the debilitating symptoms of the gastrointestinal disease. One diet was low in “FODMAPs,” a group of sugars and carbohydrates foun...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Screen Pregnant Women for Syphilis, Ob-Gyn Group Advises

Screen Pregnant Women for Syphilis, Ob-Gyn Group Advises

All expecting mothers should get a blood test for syphilis three times during pregnancy, new guidance issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends.

The practice advisory calls on doctors to test for syphilis at a pregnant woman’s first prenatal care visit, then again during the third trimester and at birth...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Even With Weight Gain, Quitting Smoking in Pregnancy Still Best for Health

Even With Weight Gain, Quitting Smoking in Pregnancy Still Best for Health

Women who smoke and become pregnant may worry that the weight gain that comes with quitting might bring its own harms to themselves or their baby.

However, a new study confirms the health benefits of quitting smoking still far exceed any weight-linked concerns.

Weight gain can occur once women decide to forgo cigarettes, but even tha...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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A-Fib Is Strong Precursor to Heart Failure

A-Fib Is Strong Precursor to Heart Failure

The dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation is mainly known for increasing people’s risk of stroke.

But people with A-Fib actually have a much higher risk of developing heart failure than suffering a stroke, a new study shows.

In fact, the risk of heart failure associated with A-Fib is “twice as large as the ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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One Neurological Factor Keeps Black, Hispanic Patients From Alzheimer's Clinical Trials

One Neurological Factor Keeps Black, Hispanic Patients From Alzheimer's Clinical Trials

Black and Hispanic patients with Alzheimer’s disease are greatly underrepresented in clinical trials, even though they’re more likely to get dementia than whites.

However, racial discrimination may not be driving this disparity, a new study finds.

Instead, Black and Hispanic people are being judged ineligible for Alzheimer’s tr...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Managing Blood Sugar After Stroke Could Be Key to Outcomes

Managing Blood Sugar After Stroke Could Be Key to Outcomes

Managing a stroke victim’s blood sugar levels after they receive powerful clot-busting drugs might help them survive their health crisis, a new trial finds.

People with high blood sugar levels were more likely to suffer a potentially deadly brain bleed after clot-busters reopened their blocked brain arteries, researchers found.

The...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Dozens of COVID Virus Mutations Arose in Man With Longest Known Case

Dozens of COVID Virus Mutations Arose in Man With Longest Known Case

An immune-compromised man with a year-and-a-half-long COVID infection served as a breeding ground for dozens of coronavirus mutations, a new study discovered.

Worse, several of the mutations were in the COVID spike protein, indicating that the virus had attempted to evolve around current vaccines, researchers report.

“This case und...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Blood Test Might Someday Diagnose Early MS

Blood Test Might Someday Diagnose Early MS

An early marker of multiple sclerosis could help doctors figure out who will eventually fall prey to the degenerative nerve disease, a new study says.

In one in 10 cases of MS, the body begins producing a distinctive set of antibodies in the blood years before symptoms start appearing, researchers reported April 19 in the journal Natur...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Check Your Fridge for Trader Joe's Fresh Basil, Linked to Salmonella

Check Your Fridge for Trader Joe's Fresh Basil, Linked to Salmonella

Fresh organic basil tainted with salmonella and sold by Trader Joe's in 29 states has sickened at least 12 people, according to an alert issued Wednesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One person was so ill that hospitalization was required.

"Throw away any Infinite Herbs organic basil purchased from Trader...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Rising Number of Americans Sent to ERs Last Year During Heat Waves

Rising Number of Americans Sent to ERs Last Year During Heat Waves

As climate change threatens another long hot summer for Americans, new data shows last summer's record-breaking temperatures sent a rising number of people to emergency departments.

At special risk of heatstroke and other heat-related issues: Working-age Americans, who often found themselves far from air conditioning when triple-digit te...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Urine Test Might Help Men Skip Prostate Biopsies

Urine Test Might Help Men Skip Prostate Biopsies

When prostate cancer strikes, one question is paramount: Is it aggressive and requiring immediate treatment, or slow-growing and worthy of monitoring only?

Right now, an invasive biopsy is the only way to answer that query, but researchers say they've developed a urine test that could do the job instead.

The test, called MyProstateSc...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Report Finds High Levels of Pesticides in 20% of  Fruits, Veggies

Report Finds High Levels of Pesticides in 20% of Fruits, Veggies

Nearly 20% of fresh, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables that Americans eat contain concerning levels of pesticides, a new report finds.

Pesticides posed significant risks in popular choices such as strawberries, green beans, bell peppers, blueberries and potatoes, the review from Consumer Reports found.

"One food in particular,...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Big Health Care Disparities Persist Across the U.S., New Report Finds

Big Health Care Disparities Persist Across the U.S., New Report Finds

Deep-seated racial and ethnic disparities persist in health care across the United States, even in states considered the most progressive, a new report shows.

For example, California received a score of 45 for the care its health system provides Hispanic Americans. The Commonwealth Fund report gives each state a 0-to-100 score for each pop...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Teens Often Bullied Online About Their Weight: Study

Teens Often Bullied Online About Their Weight: Study

Teenagers are frequently bullied about their weight on social media, and the bullying increases with each hour they spend on these sites, a new study reveals.

Nearly one in five teens (17%) said they’d experienced weight-related bullying online, according to results published April 17 in the journal PLOS One.

“This exper...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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Work That Challenges Your Brain Helps You Stay Sharp With Age

Work That Challenges Your Brain Helps You Stay Sharp With Age

Jobs that challenge your mind could help your brain age more gracefully, a new study suggests.

The harder your brain works on the job, the less likely you are to have memory and thinking problems later in life, researchers reported April 17 in the journal Neurology.

“We examined the demands of various jobs and found that ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2024
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