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20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

CDC Warns of Shortage of Bottles Needed for Crucial Blood Tests

CDC Warns of Shortage of Bottles Needed for Crucial Blood Tests

Hospitals and clinical laboratories across the United States are facing a critical shortage of bottles used to culture blood samples, federal health officials report.

Without the ability to culture blood, patients might receive the wrong antibiotics to treat conditions like endocarditis, sepsis and catheter-related blood infections, the U....

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Big Drop in U.S. Kids, Teens Misusing Prescription Meds

Big Drop in U.S. Kids, Teens Misusing Prescription Meds

Misuse of illicit prescription drugs is falling dramatically among U.S. high school students, a new study says.

The percentage of seniors who say they’ve misused prescription drugs in the past year has dropped to 2% in 2022, down from 11% back in 2009, researchers reported July 24 in the Journal of the American Medical Association

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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COVID-19 Won't Raise Odds for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Study

COVID-19 Won't Raise Odds for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Study

COVID-19 doesn’t raise a person’s risk of developing chronic fatigue syndrome more than any other infectious disease, a new study finds.

The rate of chronic fatigue syndrome following a brief illness was roughly the same between people who caught COVID and those who came down with some other malady, researchers reported July 24 in the ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Arizona Health Officials Warn of Uptick in Hantavirus Cases

Arizona Health Officials Warn of Uptick in Hantavirus Cases

Arizona health officials are reporting an increase in hantavirus infections, which are spread by rodents and can cause severe respiratory illness.

In a recent health alert, the Arizona Department of Health Services announced there have been seven confirmed cases and three deaths in that state in the past six months. 

While most ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Twice-Yearly Shot Protects At-Risk Women Against HIV

Twice-Yearly Shot Protects At-Risk Women Against HIV

Just two shots a year of an HIV treatment provided complete protection against infections in highly at-risk women, researchers reported Wednesday.

In the study of about 5,000 women in South Africa and Uganda, those given injections of lenacapavir were 100% protected, while roughly 2% of those given daily prevention pills were inf...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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More Americans With Diabetes Are Turning to Marijuana

More Americans With Diabetes Are Turning to Marijuana

As marijuana loses much of its stigma and laws around its use relax, Americans are increasingly consuming it medically and recreationally.

Americans with diabetes are no exception, a new study finds.

The number of adults with diabetes who said that they'd used cannabis at least once over the past month jumped by a third between 2021...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Better Screening Key to Closing U.S. 'Race Gap' in Colon Cancer Deaths

Better Screening Key to Closing U.S. 'Race Gap' in Colon Cancer Deaths

Black Americans are almost a third more likely to die from colon cancer than their white peers, and one key to closing that divide could be better cancer screening, a new report finds.

That means getting Black Americans quality colonoscopies and other forms of screening, but also making sure they're followed up after their test re...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Sex Differences in Knee Arthritis Emerge as Early as Childhood

Sex Differences in Knee Arthritis Emerge as Early as Childhood

The knee develops differently in men and women, with sex-specific distinctions in the joint appearing as early as childhood, a new study finds.

Taking these differences into account among girls could help prevent knee arthritis for women later in life, researchers say.

Gender-based differences in knee cartilage and ligaments develop ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Risk of Mental Illness Rises for Kids Treated in ICUs

Risk of Mental Illness Rises for Kids Treated in ICUs

Youngsters so sick they’ve needed treatment in an ICU appear to bear the scars of that experience years later, a new study finds.

Children and teenagers treated in an intensive care unit have a significantly higher risk of developing a mental illness as they grow up, researchers reported July 20 in the Journal of Affective Disorders...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Huge Warehouses Can Create Unhealthy Neighborhoods

Huge Warehouses Can Create Unhealthy Neighborhoods

Online retail giants like Amazon have made it easier for people to buy what they want when they want it, but that convenience comes at a cost to people’s health, a new study says.

Huge warehouses that support online shopping increase air pollution in the neighborhoods where they’re located, increasing residents’ risk of asthma attack...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Research Confirms Chronic High Blood Pressure's Link to Stroke

Research Confirms Chronic High Blood Pressure's Link to Stroke

Having high blood pressure in adulthood greatly raises the odds for multiple types of stroke, a new study confirms.

“Our results suggest that early diagnosis and sustained control of high blood pressure over the lifespan are critical to preventing stroke, ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage," said senior study author Dr. Deborah...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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Average Hip, Knee Replacement Patient May Be Getting Younger

Average Hip, Knee Replacement Patient May Be Getting Younger

Brent Ruch, a collegiate basketball center, opted to have his left knee replaced at age 35 after struggling with pain for years.

“Walking with a limp and living with a consistent aching pain was physically and emotionally difficult.  I didn’t want to live like that,” said Ruch, who lives in a suburb of Chicago.

When h...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2024
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U.S. Injuries From Electric Bikes, Scooters Are Soaring

U.S. Injuries From Electric Bikes, Scooters Are Soaring

More and more Americans who use "micromobility" transport, such as electric bikes and e-scooters, are motoring their way straight into the ER, new data shows.

In fact, the rate of e-bike injuries among Americans doubled each year between 2017 and 2022, reportED a team led by Dr. Adrian Fernandez, of the University of California, San Franc...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Extra Money Keeps Poorer Americans Out of the ER, Study Finds

Extra Money Keeps Poorer Americans Out of the ER, Study Finds

It's a simple strategy that could deliver powerful health dividends: New research shows that giving cash to poor people could help them stay out of the ER.

In the study, investigators followed nearly 2,900 low-income people who applied for a lottery in the Boston area. Almost 1,750 of them got up to $400 per month from November 2020 throug...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Marijuana Use While Pregnant Could Raise Odds for Complications

Marijuana Use While Pregnant Could Raise Odds for Complications

There's a slight but significant rise in dangerous obstetric complications for pregnant women who use marijuana, new research shows.

Data from almost 317,000 pregnancies in women in California found those who used the drug had higher odds for gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, weight gain that goes beyond recommended levels and a con...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Study Finds Big Shift in Who's Using GLP-1 Meds Like Ozempic

Study Finds Big Shift in Who's Using GLP-1 Meds Like Ozempic

The boom in using GLP-1 drugs like Ozempic to treat obesity has resulted in a bust regarding the drugs’ original purpose, which was to treat type 2 diabetes, a new study finds. 

New prescriptions for these drugs have doubled among people who have obesity but not diabetes, investigators found.

As a result, drug shortages have t...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Psychotherapy Via Texts Can Be Just as Effective

Psychotherapy Via Texts Can Be Just as Effective

Folks with depression who got therapy via text or voice messages fared just as well as those who got weekly video-based telemedicine sessions with a therapist, a new trial has found.

The findings "suggest that psychotherapy delivered via text messages may be a viable alternative to face-to-face or videoconferencing delivery and may allow ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Younger May Not Fare Better When It Comes to Leg Artery Disease

Younger May Not Fare Better When It Comes to Leg Artery Disease

Middle-aged folks don’t necessarily fare better than seniors following urgent surgery to unclog arteries and restore blood flow to their legs, a new study warns.

Adults in their 50s with peripheral artery disease (PAD) appear more likely to require a leg amputation within years after emergency surgery to unblock their arteries, compared ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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Another Study Ties Poor Sleep to Type 2 Diabetes

Another Study Ties Poor Sleep to Type 2 Diabetes

Consistently bad sleep is linked to a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study shows.

Both too little and too much sleep is tied to diabetes risk, and swinging wildly between the two patterns of poor sleep reflects the most risk, researchers reported recently in the journal Diabetologia.

The findings suppor...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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City vs. Country vs. Suburbs: Who's Happier?

City vs. Country vs. Suburbs: Who's Happier?

City dwellers are less likely to be healthy, happy and well-off than people living outside urban areas, a new study reports.

Instead, there’s a suburban “Goldilocks zone” between cities and rural areas where people are happiest, researchers report.

“Areas near cities but beyond their boundaries… show the highest and most eq...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 23, 2024
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