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18 May

How Many High School Students Identify As Gender Diverse?

In one school district, nearly 10% of high school students identified themselves as gender neutral, researchers say.

17 May

A Healthier Heart Might Make You Smarter

People with healthier heart function appear to have better cognitive abilities, according to a new study.

14 May

Pandemic Drinking May Be Causing Serious GI and Liver Problems, New Study Finds

Researchers say the number of hospital visits for alcohol-related GI and liver diseases surged during the COVID-19 lockdown and re-opening

Get First Colonoscopy at 45, not 50: U.S. Expert Panel

Get First Colonoscopy at 45, not 50: U.S. Expert Panel

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A lot of people think of age 50 as the magic number for getting a first colonoscopy, but earlier is better, a prestigious U.S. expert panel now says.

Based on evidence that younger people are being diagnosed with colon cancer and would benefit from screening, the U.S. Preventive ...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2021
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Online Therapy Works for Kids Battling Social Anxiety

Online Therapy Works for Kids Battling Social Anxiety

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Plenty of teens are burdened with a chronic and often paralyzing fear of being harshly judged by others. Unfortunately, many can't get in-person treatment that could help.

But now a team of Swedish researchers says that an entirely online version of a widely used behavioral thera...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2021
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It's Still Tough to Find Prices on Most U.S. Hospital Websites

It's Still Tough to Find Prices on Most U.S. Hospital Websites

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals have been required to make their prices public since 2019, but 18 months into the rule more than half weren't doing it, a new study finds.

In 2018, the Trump administration issued a rule requiring hospitals to publish their "chargemasters" on their websites. A char...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2021
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AHA News: A Stroke at 34 Rocked Her Family's World

AHA News: A Stroke at 34 Rocked Her Family's World

Lisa Anderson shook her husband, Jacob, awake.

"I just got off the phone with the nurse," she told him. "She said I could have a stroke."

Jacob bolted out of bed, trying to make sense of the news. It was around 1:30 a.m. on Easter.

Lisa had had a terrible headache the previous day. She'd gotten a deep tissue massage in the afte...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • May 18, 2021
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AHA News: Research Into Asian American Health Doesn't Always Reflect Their Diversity

AHA News: Research Into Asian American Health Doesn't Always Reflect Their Diversity

Large health studies sometimes paint a rosy picture of Asian Americans in comparison with other groups. But when researchers aren't using a broad brush, the portrait can be quite different.

When viewed not as a single entity of 20 million people but as people of Chinese, Filipino, Indian or other distinct backgrounds, significant differenc...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • May 18, 2021
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Biden Says U.S. to Share 20 Million More Doses of COVID Vaccines With Other Countries

Biden Says U.S. to Share 20 Million More Doses of COVID Vaccines With Other Countries

President Joe Biden announced Monday that the United States will share another 20 millions doses of coronavirus vaccines with countries that are in dire need of shots.

The move comes on the heels of his promise to share 60 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine with the world by July 4. This latest batch of 20 million doses will inc...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • May 18, 2021
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In One U.S. School District, Nearly 10% of Students Identify as 'Gender-Diverse'

In One U.S. School District, Nearly 10% of Students Identify as 'Gender-Diverse'

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Teens may be much more diverse in their gender identities than widely thought, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 3,200 high school students in one U.S. school district, researchers found that almost 10% were "gender-diverse." That meant they identified as a gender other...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2021
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Smoggy Air Might Raise Black Women's Odds for Fibroids

Smoggy Air Might Raise Black Women's Odds for Fibroids


TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Exposure to ozone air pollution may make Black women more likely to develop fibroids.

Compared to women exposed to the lowest levels of the pollutant, Black women exposed to the highest levels had a 35% increased risk for developing the non-cancerous growths in and a...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 18, 2021
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Sleep Apnea Raises Odds for Severe COVID-19

Sleep Apnea Raises Odds for Severe COVID-19

People suffering from severe obstructive sleep apnea are at a greater risk of catching COVID-19, a new study finds.

But researchers at Kaiser Permanente Southern California also found that the longer patients used a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask while sleeping, the more their COVID-19 risk dropped.

For the study, a ...

City Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection Risks

City Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection Risks

Sitting or strolling in a park offered precious respite for many Americans during the pandemic, and new research shows city parks don't fuel the spread of COVID-19.

Researchers looked at how people used parks in Philadelphia and New York City during the pandemic and found no connection between being in a park and catching COVID-19.

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Beta-Blocker Heart Meds Might Lower Arthritis Risk

Beta-Blocker Heart Meds Might Lower Arthritis Risk

Commonly used beta blocker heart medicine may also reduce the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis and pain, a new study suggests.

"Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and affects 15% of the general population," said study co-authors Georgina Nakafero and Abhishek Abhishek, from the University of Nottingham in England.

Low- or High-Dose, Aspirin Brings Similar Protection Against Heart Disease: Study

Low- or High-Dose, Aspirin Brings Similar Protection Against Heart Disease: Study

When it comes to taking a daily aspirin to cut heart patients' risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds dosing doesn't matter.

Researchers looked at more than 15,000 heart disease patients at 40 health centers across the United States who took either 81 milligrams (mg) or 325 mg of daily aspirin for a median of 26.2 months.

Clues to Rare Disorder Affecting Kids With COVID-19

Clues to Rare Disorder Affecting Kids With COVID-19

New insight into a rare and dangerous disorder that can occur in kids with COVID-19 could improve treatment of the condition, researchers say.

Many children infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) go undiagnosed or have no symptoms, but about one in 1,000 develop a condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in chi...

Major Gene Study Looks at Origins of Bipolar Disorder

Major Gene Study Looks at Origins of Bipolar Disorder

Scientists report they have pinpointed 64 regions in the DNA of humans that increase a person's risk of bipolar disorder, more than twice the number previously identified.

The researchers, who called this the largest investigation of bipolar disorder to date, also discovered overlap in the genetic roots of bipolar disorder and other psychi...

Starting Rehab Earlier Boosts Outcomes for Heart Failure Patients

Starting Rehab Earlier Boosts Outcomes for Heart Failure Patients

Getting heart failure patients into cardiac rehabilitation sooner rather than later after a hospitalization is tied to a better prognosis, new research shows.

"Typically, cardiac rehabilitation programs require patients to be stable for six weeks after a hospitalization," explained cardiologist Dr. Benjamin Hirsh, who wasn't connected to t...

  • Ernie Mundell and Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporters
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  • May 17, 2021
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Surgical Snip Might Prevent Stroke in People With A-fib

Surgical Snip Might Prevent Stroke in People With A-fib

MONDAY, May 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A simple surgery may help lower the risk for strokes by more than a third in patients with atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, a new trial finds.

The reduction in stroke risk is achieved by blocking the left atrial appendage, an unused, finger-like tissue that traps...

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 17, 2021
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Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Pandemic Caused Rise in Telemedicine Visits for Kids, But Will the Trend Continue?

Virtual doctor visits for children grew this past year during the pandemic, but a new poll shows U.S. parents are divided on whether they will continue using this option in the future.

The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan found that about one in five children had a virtual visi...

Being a 'Night Owl' Raises Odds for Diabetes If You're Obese

Being a 'Night Owl' Raises Odds for Diabetes If You're Obese

MONDAY, May 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Though obesity by itself can drive up heart disease risk, new research suggests diabetes and heart disease risk is especially high when combined with a tendency to stay up late at night.

The finding stems from a comparison of sleep patterns and disease in 172 middle-aged people as...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 17, 2021
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A Healthier Heart Might Make You Smarter

A Healthier Heart Might Make You Smarter

MONDAY, May 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In new evidence that illustrates that health issues rarely exist in a vacuum, a new study finds a link between heart health and brain function.

Existing evidence suggests that having heart disease raises one's risk of dementia, and vice versa, but a team of researchers based in Lo...

  • Serena McNiff HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 17, 2021
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AHA News: Stroke Affects the Whole Family, And Here's How to Help Keep It Together

AHA News: Stroke Affects the Whole Family, And Here's How to Help Keep It Together

When Carol Coulther's husband, Rich, had a stroke, her teacher instincts kicked in immediately. She began writing down everything his doctors said to make sense of what happened and what he would need in his recovery.

Coulther's instinct to document everything was spot on, according to advice from Dr. Amytis Towfighi, director of neurologi...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • May 17, 2021
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