Duren's Clinic Pharmacy Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Cancer: Uterine".

Health News Results - 12

Being obese or overweight can increase the odds of developing several types of cancers, new research from the United Kingdom reveals.

But shedding the excess pounds can lower the risk, researchers say.

Reducing obesity cuts the risk for endometrial cancer by 44% and uterine cancer by 39%, and could also prevent 18% of kidney cancers and 17% of stomach and liver cancers, according t...

Women face no increased risk of pelvic cancer -- tumors of the bladder, cervix and ovaries -- if they have surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a new study finds.

Concerns about possible complications and safety issues related to use of surgical mesh -- particularly for a condition called pelvic organ prolapse, and also for SUI -- have made some patients reluctant to have m...

Obesity may shorten the lives of patients with certain types of cancers, but not others, a new research review concludes.

The analysis, of more than 200 studies, found that across numerous cancers, obesity was linked to shorter survival. The list included breast, colon, prostate, uterine and pancreatic cancers.

On the other hand, patients with lung, kidney or melanoma skin cancer al...

For some patients who have early endometrial cancer or a precancerous condition, a hysterectomy may not be a good option because of serious health issues or the desire to preserve fertility.

Now, a new Australian study has found that a hormonal IUD might be an effective treatment option for these women.

About 82% of women who had a precancerous condition and used the levonorgestrel...

The same lifestyle habits that protect the heart can also curb the risk of a range of cancers, a large new study confirms.

The study of more than 20,000 U.S. adults found both bad news and good news.

People with risk factors for heart disease also faced increased odds of developing cancer over the next 15 years. On the other hand, people who followed a heart-healthy lifestyle c...

Despite rampant fears that cancer patients are at higher risk of having severe cases of COVID-19, a new study suggests gynecologic cancers do not boost the chances of hospitalization or death.

"Our study should be reassuring for women with gynecologic cancers who are worried that having cancer increases their risk of becoming seriously ill if they go to the hospital because of COVID-1...

High levels of the sex hormone testosterone may trigger different health problems in men and women, a new study reveals.

In women, testosterone may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, while in men it lowers that risk. But high levels of testosterone increase the risk for breast and endometrial cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, the researchers reported.

"Our fi...

Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds.

"Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.

She and her colleagues from the University of Utah ...

Women who must have their uterus removed should be wary of a procedure called uncontained uterine power morcellation, Yale University researchers warn.

This once common surgical option for hysterectomy or myomectomy (removal of uterine fibroids) has been linked to worse outcomes for patients with undiagnosed uterine cancer at the time of surgery.

In a hysterectomy, the proce...

There's been a steep uptick in aggressive uterine cancers among American women, especially black women, since 2000, a new study shows.

It also found that black women with these aggressive cancers have lower survival rates than other women.

Researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) analyzed data on uterine cancer among 30- to 79-year-olds. They found that cases ...

As more young American adults struggle with extra weight, they are paying an even steeper price as the rates of obesity-related cancers rise in this age group.

Obesity has already been linked to rising rates of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and knee replacements. Now, new research suggests cancer can be added to that list, and the rate of obesity-related cancers is certain to keep cl...

Over the past 25 years, the number of Americans who have died from cancer has dropped dramatically, though racial and economic disparities persist, a new study reveals.

Between 1991 and 2016, deaths from cancer dropped 27 percent. In real numbers, that's almost 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

"The decline in deaths is largely driven...