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More than five centuries ago, Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci produced a now-famous image of what he considered the perfectly proportioned male body: the "Vitruvian Man."

The drawing was inspired by even earlier pondering on the perfect human form by first-century A.D. Roman architect Vitruvius.

Now, work done by American scientists involving high-tech scans of the bod...

The virus struck swiftly, stoking panic, fear and mistrust as it sickened millions and killed thousands -- and now, more than a century later, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic offers lasting lessons for a world in the grip of COVID-19.

"The questions they asked then are the questions being asked now," said Christopher Nichols, an associate professor of history at Oregon State University...

Nesyamun, an Egyptian priest who chanted hymns at the grand temple of Karnak in Thebes 3,000 years ago, has been allowed to speak once more.

Well, maybe not speak in full sentences: A British team has re-created the mummified Nesyamun's throat using 3-D technology, allowing it to utter a vowel they believe mimics how the priest sounded.

Here it is:

The cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. created temperatures so hot that one poor soul's brain was transformed into glass, researchers report.

Archaeologists working at the site of Herculaneum -- the other city wiped out in the eruption, alongside Pompeii -- discovered small bits of black glass inside the skull of one of the victims.

Tests of the glassy materia...

Michelangelo's David is perhaps the world's most famous statue, gazed upon by millions over centuries.

And yet it's only this year that an American doctor has spotted an anatomical insight made by the artist -- one that's passed without notice on David for more than 500 years.

In the vast majority of sculptures, and in the everyday physiology of living people, the jugular ve...

Leonardo da Vinci's legendary struggles to complete projects suggest he may have had attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a British researcher says.

That's the latest in a series of attempts to understand the genius and work habits of an inventor and artist often considered the most creative person ever known.

The fascination with da Vinci dovetails with the 500t...

A fainting-related fall that caused nerve damage in his right hand could explain why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills declined later in life, a new paper suggests.

The report, published as the world marks the 500th anniversary of the artist's death, contradicts the common belief that da Vinci's difficulties stemmed from a stroke.

To arrive at t...

Leonardo da Vinci was an atrocious speller, a sure sign of dyslexia, but it's possible that very disorder fueled his genius, a researcher says.

May 2 marks the 500th anniversary of the death of da Vinci, an inventor and artist regarded by many as the most creative person ever known.

"Dyslexia is probably one of the things that made da Vinci so creative, made him Leonardo," s...