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An early marker of multiple sclerosis could help doctors figure out who will eventually fall prey to the degenerative nerve disease, a new study says.

In one in 10 cases of MS, the body begins producing a distinctive set of antibodies in the blood years before symptoms start appearing, researchers reported April 19 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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  • Jobs that challenge your mind could help your brain age more gracefully, a new study suggests.

    The harder your brain works on the job, the less likely you are to have memory and thinking problems later in life, researchers reported April 17 in the journal Neurology.

    “We examined the demands of various jobs and found that cognitive stimulation at work during different sta...

    Antipsychotics can substantially increase dementia patients’ risk of many serious health problems, a new study warns.

    Dementia patients prescribed antipsychotics have increased risk of stroke, blood clots, heart attack, heart failure, bone fractures, pneumonia and kidney damage, researchers ...

    Want to feel happier?

    Live in or near a place with a rich diversity of nature, a new study says.

    Environments with plentiful natural features -- trees, birds, plants and rivers -- are associated with better mental well-being than the more spartan landscapes of suburbia, researchers found.

    Further, spending time in areas like this can provide benefits that last up to eight hour...

    Most folks think of blinking as the eyes' version of windshield wipers, clearing the eye of debris and maybe lubricating it, too.

    But blinking is much more than that, researchers report: It also helps the brain process what it's seeing.

    That's perhaps counterintuitive: Wouldn't it make sense to not blink, so eyes are receiving an uninterrupted stream of information?

    Tapping the power of the small brain region called the cerebellum could improve patients’ ability to move cutting-edge robotic limbs, a new study suggests.

    The cerebellum is an ancient structure located under the brain, just above where the spinal cord connects to the brain.

    This structure has largely been overlooked by prosthetics researchers in favor of the cerebral cortex, whic...

    Lucid episodes are an unexpected occurrence among people with late-stage Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

    But these spontaneous events -- in which a person temporarily regains an ability to communicate that appeared to be permanently lost -- are not always a sign of impending death, a recent study argues.

    Half the time, people live more than six months following their lu...

    You know exercise is great for your cardiovascular health, but new research suggests that your brain has a lot to do with it.

    It's all about physical activity's ability to lower stress levels within the brain, explained a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston.

    Bolstering that finding, their study found that exercise brought the greatest heart benefits to peop...

    The discovery of a gene variant that rids the brain of toxic plaques linked to Alzheimer's might lead to new treatments for the disease, researchers report.

    The variant arises naturally in people who don't seem to get Alzheimer's disease despite having another gene, called APOEe4, that strongly prom...

    Desks that require folks to stand or move as they work also might help them produce better results on the job, a new study suggests.

    People's brains became sharper when working at a desk that made them stand, step or walk rather than sit, results show.

    Reasoning scores in particular improved when at an active workstation, researchers said.

    “It is feasible to blend movement w...

    As their aging brains shrink, older dogs can suffer the same memory and thinking problems as many older humans do.

    But dogs are just like humans in another way -- playtime and social activities can help preserve their brain function, a new study finds.

    Exercising, socializing, playing with toys and playing with other dogs helped a small group of beagles maintain their brains, resear...

    For folks who have battled alcohol dependency for years, any treatment that could curb or block alcohol cravings would be a huge advance.

    Now, research in mice is giving a glimmer of hope that just such a therapy might be possible.

    A compound -- so far dubbed LY2444296 -- appears to block a key brain cell receptor called the kappa opioid receptor (KOP), a team at the Scripps Researc...

    Out of a host of possible risk factors for dementia, three really stood out in a new analysis: Diabetes, air pollution and alcohol.

    British and American researchers used brain scans to focus on a neurological network they labeled a "weak spot" in the brain. This network is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, as well as

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 28, 2024
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  • Fried foods not only wreck the waistline, but they could also be harming the brain, a new study of lab rats suggests.

    Fed chow that was fried in sesame or sunflower oil, the rodents developed liver and colon problems that wound up affecting their brain health, researchers found.

    These brain health effects not only were found in the lab rats that munched down the fried food, but also...

    Youngsters might have good cause to think they're brainier than their parents or grandparents, a new study finds.

    It turns out that human brains are getting larger with each generation, potentially adding more brain reserve and reducing the overall risk of dementia, researchers report March 25 in the journa...

    Chemicals found in common household products might damage the brain's wiring, a new study warns.

    These chemicals -- found in disinfectants, cleaners, hair products, furniture and textiles -- could be linked to degenerative brain diseases like multiple sclerosis and autism, researchers report.

    The chemicals specifically affect the brain's oligodendrocytes, a specialized type of cell ...

    “Havana Syndrome” appears to cause real and severe symptoms among federal employees suffering from the mystery illness, but there's no evidence of brain injury or biological abnormalities among them, a new report shows.

    Researchers evaluated 81 U.S. diplomats and other federal employees, mostly stationed abroad, who had complained of hearing noise and feeling head pressure just before...

    In people with type 1 diabetes, fluctuations in blood sugar levels can affect thinking skills in various ways, new research shows.

    Researchers looked specifically at what's known as cognitive processing speed (how fast people process incoming information) and attention.

    <...

    After a car crash, women are more likely to go into shock than men, even when their injuries are less severe, new research shows.

    "Women are arriving to the trauma bay with signs of shock more often than men, regardless of injury severity," said study leader Susan Cronn, a researcher at the Medical College of W...

    Specialized brain scans may accurately predict whether a psychotic patient will go on to develop treatment-resistant schizophrenia, Dutch researchers report.

    The scan -- called a neuromelanin-sensitive MRI, or NM-MRI for short -- zeroes in on a brain pigment called neuromelanin. This pigment c...

    Combat veterans who suffered traumatic brain injuries due to explosive blasts may have markers in their spinal fluid similar to those of Alzheimer's disease, new research finds.

    "Previous research has shown that moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries may increase a person's risk of Alzheimer's disease," said senior study author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 14, 2024
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  • Kids struggling with mental health problems have a tougher time recovering from a concussion, a new study finds.

    These troubled kids tend to have more emotional symptoms after concussion and take longer to fully recover, results show.

    In ...

    New technology might soon allow men in same-sex relationships to have a child genetically related to both dads, researchers say.

    The technology uses skin cells from one person to alter the genetics of a donated egg, researchers reported March 8 in the journal Science Advances.

    That egg can then be fertilized b...

    Instead of approving the new Alzheimer's drug donanemab this month, as was expected, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will now require the experimental medication be scrutinized more closely by an expert panel, the drug's maker said Friday.

    “The FDA has informed Lilly it wants to further understand topics related to evaluating the safety and efficacy of donanemab, including the saf...

    Folks who've suffered a concussion and then develop headaches show iron accumulation in their brains, new research discovers.

    Excess brain iron stores are a hallmark of damage, noted a team led by Simona Nikolova, of the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. The team is slated to present the results in April at the an...

    Sleep apnea could have detrimental effects on the brain, causing memory or thinking problems, a new study suggests.

    People suffering from sleep apnea are about 50% more likely to also report having memory or thinking problems, compared to those without sleep apnea, researchers say.

    “These findings highlight the importance of early screening for sleep apnea,” said researcher

    In a finding that unearths yet another way Long COVID can harm health, new research finds the condition may trigger thinking declines.

    Published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study involved cognitive testing on nearly 113,000 people in England. It found that thos...

    Middle-aged folks who have difficulties navigating their way through space could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease years later, a new study finds.

    “Very early symptoms of dementia can be subtle and difficult to detect, but problems with navigation are thought to be some of the first changes in Alzheimer's disease," noted

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 29, 2024
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  • Live musical performances speak to the soul, stimulating the brain in ways more powerful than listening to a recorded tune does, new research finds.

    “Our study showed that pleasant and unpleasant emotions performed as live music elicited much higher and more consistent activity in the amygdala [the emotional center of the brain] than recorded music,” said lead researcher

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 28, 2024
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  • In a new study, yoga appears to have bolstered the brain health of older women who had risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    The study can't prove that the ancient practice will slow or prevent the onset of Alzheimer's, but it did seem to reverse some forms of neurological decline, researchers said.

    “That is what yoga is good for -- to reduce stress, to improve brain health, subje...

    Pesticides and herbicides used in farming appear to increase people's risk of Parkinson's disease, a new, preliminary study finds.

    People exposed to pesticides and herbicides are 25% to 36% more likely to develop Parkinson's, according to a study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's upcoming annual meeting in April.

    The Parkinson's risk was specifically higher in t...

    Preventing noise-related hearing loss from a loud concert, a banging jackhammer or a rifle blast could be as simple as managing levels of zinc within the inner ear, a new study reports.

    Such hearing loss stems from cellular damage associated with an excess of free-floating zinc in the inner ear, researchers say.

    Lab mouse experiments showed drugs that soak up the excess zinc can hel...

    Could drugs that give a boost to men's sexual performance help them stave off Alzheimer's disease?

    That's the main finding from a study suggesting that erectile dysfunction meds like Cialis, Levitra and Viagra might lower the odds for the memory-robbing illness.

    The study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, cautioned British researchers at University College London.

    “...

    No one's brain is as sharp at 60 as it was at 20.

    However, new research supports the notion that folk's brains can make subtle adjustments with age to compensate for that decline.

    A team of British researchers has found more evidence that as the mind ages, it sometimes recruits help from certain brain regions to make up for deficits elsewhere.

    This does not happen for everyone...

    Scientists say they've created the first 3D-printed brain tissue where neurons network and "talk" to each other.

    The breakthrough could be an advance for studying neurological processes in the lab, say a team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    “This could be a hugely powerful model to help us understand how brain cells and parts of the brain communicate in humans,” said s...

    New research suggests healthy lifestyles can help stave off dementia, perhaps by building a resilient 'cognitive reserve' in the aging brain.

    The study was based on the brain autopsies on 586 people who lived to an average of almost 91. Researchers compared each person's lifestyle and end-of-life mental skills to their neurological signs of dementia, such as brain protein plaques or chang...

    It's known by the street name "gas station heroin," but a new government report finds the highly addictive supplement Neptune's Fix may also contain synthetic pot.

    The product has already been linked to seizures, brain swelling and hallucinations, researchers reported Thursday in Morbidity and Mortality Wee...

    Advanced brain recording techniques have revealed how neurons in the human brain work together to produce speech.

    The recordings provide a detailed map of how people think about what words they want to say and then speak them aloud, researchers report in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Nature.

    Specifically, t...

    Women with a common ovarian disorder might be more likely to have memory and thinking problems in middle age, a new study suggests.

    Females diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) scored lower on cognitive tests than women without the condition, according to a report published Jan. 31 in the journal Neurology.

    The condition specifically appeared to affect memory, at...

    Radon, an invisible, naturally occurring radioactive gas, appears to raise a person's risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

    Already known as the second leading cause of lung cancer, these new findings suggest exposure to radon can increase risk of stroke by as much as 14%, according to a report published Jan. 31 in the journal Neurology.

    “Our research found an increased r...

    A walk in the woods appears to sharpen the mind better than an urban asphalt amble, a new brain scan study finds.

    People strolling through an arboretum at the University of Utah performed better on brain function tests than those who walked around an asphalt-laden medical campus, according to findings published recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 1, 2024
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  • Elon Musk, co-founder of Neuralink, said this week that the company placed the first brain implant in a human over the weekend.

    In a statement posted on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter that is now owned by Musk, the billionaire said the patient was “recovering well.” He added that...

    Five of eight British children who received human growth hormone from the pituitary glands of deceased donors went on to develop early-onset Alzheimer's disease many decades later, researchers report.

    Researchers at University College London (UCL) suspect that the growth hormone received by these people in childhood may have contained amyloid-beta protein plaques, which build up in the br...

    Stuart Douglas, 78, has played the accordion all his long life.

    “I learned to play the accordion as a boy living in a mining village in Fife and carried on throughout my career in the police force and beyond,” said Douglas, of Cornwall, England. “These days I still play regularly, and playing in the band also keeps my calendar full, as we often perform in public.”

    Douglas' p...

    'Young folk don't write in cursive anymore' is a common complaint of older folks in this keyboard-obsessed age.

    Now, new research suggests that kids who ignore handwriting are, in fact, missing out: By the time they reach college, their brain "connectivity" may be weaker than folks who write regularly.

    In a study of 36 university students, "we show that when writing by hand, brain c...

    Strange visual disturbances occur early in about 10% of Alzheimer's cases, and when this happens it almost always signals the impending arrival of the disease, a new study finds.

    The condition is called posterior cortical atrophy (PCA). It involves a sudden difficulty in performing vision-related tasks -- for example writing, judging whether an object is moving or stationary, or easily pi...

    Two new strategies using deep brain stimulation can improve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, Duke University researchers have found.

    Doctors can efficiently improve symptoms of Parkinson's by simultaneously targeting to key brain structures using a newly developed self-adjusting device, researchers recently reported in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 23, 2024
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  • A daily multivitamin could help people keep their brains healthy as they age, a new trial finds.

    Results suggest taking multivitamins could help prevent memory loss and slow cognitive aging among older adults, researchers report in the Jan. 18 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutritio...

    TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2024 (HeathDay News) -- Folks often feel more alert and savvy after a great workout, and dopamine might be the reason why.

    A small, new study by British and Japanese researchers found higher levels of the "feel good" brain neurotransmitter were released by men during exercise.

    In turn, that seemed tied to better performance on thinking tests, the researchers said.<...

    Magnetic zaps to the brain can significantly help people with severe depression, if the procedure is guided using MRI brain scans, a new clinical trial has concluded.

    On average, patients showed substantial improvements in depression, anxiety, cognition and quality of life for at least six months after undergoing MRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), results show.

    One-...

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