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San Francisco is on the verge of passing a ban on "forever chemicals" in the protective clothing firefighters wear while battling blazes.

City lawmakers are expected to pass an ordinance on Tuesday that will prohibit the use of firefighting...

SUNDAY, May 12, 2024 (HealthDay News) — If you use a medical device such as a blood glucose monitor or insulin pump, keeping it charged is a must. 

But devices that rely on a USB charger can overheat, which may cause minor injuries, serious burns or fires. That's why it's important to read, understand and follow the manufacturer's use and care directions and use only approved charg...

Nearly 40% of Americans live where the air is polluted enough to harm them, a new report warns.

In the American Lung Association's “State of the Air” report, released Wednesday, the number of people living with levels of air pollution that could jeopardize their health climbed from about 119 million in 2023 to 131 million n...

It's easy to see the immediate health hazards of wildfire smoke, as people struggle to breathe through a sooty haze.

But a new study finds that harmful chemicals found in wildfire smoke can linger in a person's home for weeks after the immediate threat has passed, posing a continuing health threat.

The chemicals -- compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) -- are high...

Unhealthy air from wildfires is causing hundreds of additional deaths in the western United States every year, a new study claims.

Wildfires have undercut progress made in cleaning America's air, and between 2000 and 2020 caused an increase of 670 premature deaths each year in the West, researchers report Dec. 4 in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.

“Our air is supposed...

Controlled forest burns can prevent the sort of high-intensity wildfires that have plagued the Western U.S. and Canada as a result of climate change, a new study argues.

A low-intensity fire in the mixed conifer forests of California provides an estimated 60% reduction in the risk of a catastrophic wildfire, and that effect lasts at least six years, researchers report in the journal <...

More people around the world are exposed to wildfire smoke that has the potential to harm human health, and their numbers are growing, new research finds.

More than 2 billion people are exposed to at least one day of potentially health-impacting wildfire smoke each year, a figure that has grown by almost 7% in the past decade, according to a study led by Australian scientists.

Mor...

For the second time this month, massive plumes of smoke from hundreds of out-of-control Canadian wildfires are polluting much of America's air.

Among the major U.S. cities now experiencing poor air quality are St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati and Chicago, while entire states have also issued air quality alerts, according to the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 29, 2023
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  • Wildfires that have been spreading throughout Canada in recent weeks are now spewing tons of smoke southward into the United States.

    The smoke was so thick on Tuesday that New York City's skyline could not be seen clearly and air quality alerts were issued to residents from parts of the N...

    Large, uncontrolled wildfires in Nova Scotia are creating unhealthy air in the Northeast region of the United States, including parts of Connecticut.

    This significant smoke plume is likely to cause elevated levels of fine particulate matter, the American Lung Association warned in its alert. Particulate matter contains microscopic solids or liquid droplets that are so small that they can ...

    Wildfires are known to have a lot of negative impacts on the environment and the health of the people who live through them.

    Yet another is the worsening of skin conditions, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). The group shared strategies to minimize the effect air pollution can have on people's skin during its annual meeting, held this past weekend in New Orleans.

    When you turn your clock forward for the start of daylight saving time, take time for some potentially life-saving safety checks.

    “When moving your clocks forward, remember to check every level of your home for working smoke and CO alarms,” said Alexander Hoehn-Saric,...

    Exposure to wildfire smoke can increase the risk of premature birth, new research suggests.

    For the study, the researchers reviewed birth certificates and hospital delivery data for more than 2.5 million pregnant women in California from 2007 to 2012, and used satellite images and ZIP codes to compare daily estimates of wildfire smoke intensity.

    The study found that from the four we...

    In the wake of natural disasters like wildfires that have destroyed whole communities with alarming speed, some folks are focused on the beloved pets left behind — and how to save others in the future.

    More than 1,000 pets died in the Marshall fire on Dec. 30, 2021, in Boulder County, Colo., according to

    In 2021, U.S. emergency rooms treated more than 193,000 burn injuries caused by an array of products, ranging from cooking devices to fireworks and space heaters.

    Most of these burns were preventable, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    Children under age 10 are especially vulnerable, accounting for 26% of all burn injuries in 2021, according to a commission news r...

    Fires started by people account for a majority of premature deaths related to inhalation of tiny smoke particles in the United States, a new study reveals.

    These blazes, which are increasing, led to 20,000 premature deaths in 2018. That was 270% more than in 2003, according to researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge.

    More than 80% of the premature deaths ...

    Some Americans appear to be moving from areas with frequent hurricanes and heat waves to places threatened by wildfire and rising heat.

    They're trading in the risk of one set of natural disasters for another because the wildfires are only beginning to become a national issue, according to researchers.

    "These findings are concerning, because people are moving into harm's way -- into...

    Winter weather brings with it plenty of hazards, including risks from carbon monoxide poisoning, and fires.

    But the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) offers suggestions for staying safe on those cold winter nights.

    When storms knock out power...

    When you set your clocks back on Sunday, do some simple at-home safety checks that could save your life.

    Check your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors to be sure they're working. This is also a good time to replace their batteries.

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends replacing batteries once a...

    A tool used to restore forest ecosystems could also be key to the battle against tick-borne disease, researchers say.

    Forest managers and land owners use prescribed fire to combat invasive species, improve wildlife habitat and restore ecosystem health.

    A recent study suggests it could ...

    While most people know that breathing in wildfire smoke isn't good for respiratory health, they may not know that unclean air is also problematic for the heart.

    Individuals with underlying

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 15, 2022
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  • When hurricanes, floods and fires hit, everyone can struggle to respond and cope, but new research suggests that women, people with kids under 18, renters, the poor, and Black and Asian Americans are the most vulnerable to weather disasters.

    These groups need special help before disasters occur to make sure they're equipped to act, said lead researcher Smitha Rao, an assistant professor ...

    While California works to restore its landscape after years of historic wildfires, new research could transform the way in which veterinarians treat animals recovered from damaged forests.

    The study found that cats who inhaled smoke or suffered burns are at risk for forming deadly clots. Not only that, the scientists were able ...

    Many U.S. parents don't take proper precautions to protect their children from fireworks-related burns and injuries, claims a new survey released just ahead of the Fourth of July.

    The poll of more than 2,000 parents of children ages 3-18 was conducted this spring and found that more than half sa...

    More Americans now live in wildfire zones as wildfire seasons have become longer, with hotter, faster-moving fires.

    If you're one of those who live in a location threatened by wildfires, it's important to be prepared, according to Environment America, a national network of 30 state environmental groups.

    You should have a...

    Wildfires, like the one currently raging in New Mexico, are known to cause upticks in breathing issues and heart attacks in their immediate wake for folks who live nearby.

    Now, new Canadian research shows that these fires may also increase risk for lung and brain cancer o...

    Larger and more intense wildfires in the U.S. Pacific Northwest are causing a spike in air pollution across North America that endangers millions of people, a new study warns.

    Wildfire smoke has been linked to significant

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 21, 2022
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  • The more blazes firefighters battle, the higher their risk for a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (a-fib), a new study shows.

    "Clinicians who care for firefighters need to be aware of the increased cardiovascular risk, especially the increased ris...

    U.S. wildfires have become larger, more frequent and more widespread in the past two decades, and the situation will become even worse in the future, a new study warns.

    "Projected changes in climate, fuel and ignitions suggest that we'll see more and larger fires in the future," said l...

    With winter storms roaring through much of the United States this week, millions of Americans may face power outages that could put them at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires as they try to keep warm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    When the power goes out, many people use portable generators or other devices for heat and power, but improper use of such equipme...

    Wildfires and rising temperatures are exposing more and more Americans to an air pollution double-whammy of smoke and smog, a new study warns.

    Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of people in western states have been simultaneously exposed to high levels of two kinds of air pollution: Fine-particle pollution generated by

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

    The deadly tornadoes that devastated communities in multiple states this past weekend have destroyed many homes and left others without power.

    But if people turn to generators to manage in the aftermath, they should use caution, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Portable generators can expose users to increased risk of

  • Cara Murez
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  • December 15, 2021
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  • Hearing dogs make a huge difference in deaf people's lives, a new British study shows.

    The dogs are trained to alert deaf people to everyday sounds such as doorbells, human voices, baby monitors and alarm clocks, as well as safety-related sounds such as smoke and intruder alarms. The animals also provide companionship and emotional support.

    The trial included 165 people in the Unite...

    Setting your clocks back an hour this Sunday also means it's time to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    Working alarms are especially important because people are spending more time at home due to the pandemic, which means furnaces, fireplaces and other fuel-burning appliances are being used mo...

    You might think that wildfires in the western United States would only affect folks in places like Colorado, California or Oregon.

    But a new study estimates that three-quarters of smoke-related deaths and visits to the emergency room for asthma in the United States happen east of the Rocky Mount...

    Wildfires are killing people around the world -- even those with limited exposure to wildfire-related pollution, an international team of researchers reports.

    The new research revealed that short-term exposure to wildfire-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the air is i...

    The wildfire smoke now smothering wide portions of the United States isn't just stinging eyes and tightening chests -- it also might be contributing to the current surge of severe COVID-19 cases.

    Data from three Western states subject to frequent wildfires shows that COVID-19 cases and deaths increase with the amount of smoke pollution in the air, according to a new study.

    As wildfi...

    Roaring, fast-moving blazes. Choking smoke. Fiery tornados. Thunderstorms and lightning.

    The Dixie Fire -- now the single largest wildfire in California history -- continues to spread, having burned through more than 750 square miles of forest land north of Sacramento.

    The astonishing spread of smoke from the fire, causing discomfort and illness to people hundreds or thousands of mi...

    Smoke from wildfires burning along the West Coast is choking the entire United States, reminding everyone of the hazards of climate change.

    But that haze isn't just stinging your eyes and choking your breath -- it poses a direct threat to your health, experts say.

    Wildfire smoke has been shown to increase risk of heart attacks and strokes, as well as lung ailments like asthma, Ameri...

    Breathing in smoke from wildfires may significantly increase the spread of COVID-19, researchers say.

    The warning, from a new study of links between smoke-caused air pollution and SARS-CoV-2 infections, comes as firefighters battle 80 large wildfires in the western United States. The largest -- 300 miles south of Portland, Ore. -- covers over 500 square miles.

    For this study, resear...

    If you're not careful, your grilling season could go up in flames, an expert warns.

    Each year, U.S. fire departments respond to about 5,700 residential barbecue fires, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration. Those fires result in thousands of emergency department visits and $37 million in damages a year.

    "The best way to prevent damages and i...

    The COVID-19 pandemic likely played a role in the 50% increase in deaths from fireworks in the United States last year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    Many public fireworks displays were canceled last summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That led many people to light rockets, sparklers and firecrackers in their own backyards, the agency said.

    The result: A...

    If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

    Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

    Hurricane season in North America runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has ...

    Increasing numbers of wildfires are making poor air quality more common throughout the Western United States, according to a new study.

    The findings suggest that many cities may soon have trouble meeting air quality standards, said lead author Kai Wilmot, a doctoral student in atmospheric sciences at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

    Wilmot's team examined Western air qualit...

    When wildfires choked the air and turned the skies orange throughout the American West in recent years, they caused a variety of health problems from coughs and runny noses to life-threatening heart attacks and strokes.

    But eczema and other skin issues were a result of the wildfires, too, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University ...

    The smoke from forest fires is sending children to emergency rooms with respiratory problems at higher rates than ever before, a new study finds.

    "Kids are particularly vulnerable to pollution from wildfires, so they can have asthma exacerbation and other respiratory problems," said senior researcher Tarik Benmarhnia, an associate professor of family medicine and public health at the Univ...

    Winter weather can bring hidden dangers, the most deadly of which can include carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

    As blizzards, tornadoes and severe storms batter the nation and many lose power and heat, the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires from portable generators and other devices increase exponentially, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Carb...