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Health News Results - 306

About two-thirds of U.S. parents say they'll send their kids to school again this fall, and most also support COVID-19 testing and social distancing policies for schoolchildren, a new survey finds.

Among parents, only about 12% said they would not send at least one of their kids to school, while 21% were still uncertain about their decision. Many are waiting to hear more about...

Not only have women been more likely than men to lose their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic, but they are also shouldering more child care responsibilities at home, new research shows.

Overall, employment among women dropped 13 percentage points between March and early April -- from 59% to 46% -- while male employment dropped 10 percentage points -- from 64% to 54%...

Summer camps are an annual ritual for millions of children, but one expert offers advice on how to determine whether it's safe to send your kids to one during the coronavirus pandemic.

First, your children need to understand the importance of regular hand-washing, according to Dr. Cynthia Roldan, medical director, from Carroll Hospital's pediatrics department, in Westminster, Md.

...

Children with developmental disabilities or delays have an increased risk of asthma, a new study finds.

"This research has shown that it's not just clinicians or pediatricians that should be aware that children with disabilities and delays may also have other health problems. It's also schools, after-school programs and other community-wide programs," said study senior author Sarah Me...

Children of mothers with long-term depression have an increased risk of behavioral problems and poor development, researchers say.

The new study included nearly 900 Australian mothers and 978 of their children. Levels of depression were examined in the mothers before, during and after pregnancy. The investigators also analyzed their children's development and behavior.

One i...

Back off, Mom and Dad: Teens who feel their parents are overly controlling may have more difficulty with romantic relationships as adults, a new study suggests.

The study, which followed 184 teens, found that those with domineering parents had a future that was different from their peers: On average, they did not go as far in their education, and they were less likely to be in a roman...

The isolation of the coronavirus pandemic might be stunting the social growth of young children, experts say.

Since schools closed across the United States this past spring to stem the spread of COVID-19, kids have been deprived of experiences that are essential to their emotional development -- playing at recess, sharing lunch with classmates and learning together in the classroom.

In this year of social distancing and economic uncertainty, dad probably doesn't need a new tie for Father's Day. Instead, it might be time to mark the occasion with creativity – and a little push in a healthy direction.

"A lot of old guys like us need a gentle push from time to time," said Dr. Elliot Davidson, medical director of the Cleveland Clinic Akron General Center for Fami...

Talk to a teacher if you want an idea of how addicted teenagers can become using Juul and other pod-based e-cigarettes.

That's the suggestion of Patricia Folan, director of the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

"We've had teachers tell us that once they confiscate a Juul from kids in school, the teens beg to get them back because they're so u...

U.S. children and teenagers are still downing too many "empty calories" -- primarily from sugary beverages, sweets and pizza, a new government study finds.

The study, based on a long-running federal health survey, did turn up some good news: In recent years, kids have been eating fewer empty calories, versus a decade before.

The bad news is, by 2016, those sources still acco...

When kids and teens chafe under COVID-19 quarantine, how can parents stop the meltdowns and misbehavior?

Start with understanding: Young people miss their friends and their freedom. Younger kids might respond by throwing tantrums. Teens might isolate themselves, ignore social distancing rules or sneak out to see friends.

To curb negative behavior, experts from Penn State Childre...

For parents hoping their "picky" eater will grow out of it, a new study may be unwelcome news.

Researchers found that choosy 4-year-olds were still turning their noses up at many foods at age 9 -- suggesting their finicky eating is more of a trait than a phase.

The study, which followed over 300 children, found three patterns: The majority were consistently middle-of-the-roa...

Skin-to-skin contact between parents and babies -- often called "kangaroo care" -- provides major benefits to preemies' hearts and brains, Australian researchers say.

They assessed 40 babies born about 10 weeks early with an average weight of 2.9 pounds. Normal birth weight is 6.6 pounds.

One hour a day of kangaroo care significantly improved blood flow to the newborns' brai...

Having a child with cancer doesn't appear to affect parents' risk of splitting up or their plans to have more kids.

That's the conclusion of a Danish study that compared more than 12,400 parents of children diagnosed with cancer between 1982 and 2014 to nearly 70,000 parents whose kids were cancer-free.

Parents were followed until 10 years after a child's cancer diagnosis --...

If there's such a thing as a "new normal" during the coronavirus pandemic, it's a constant state of stress.

And it's particularly intense for many parents who are keeping house, working from home, and trying to keep their kids' online learning on track at the same time, according to a new online survey.

Nearly half (46%) of respondents who have kids younger than 18 said ...

Lots of TV time, no PE classes, and a fridge full of food: It's a recipe for weight gain for kids under "stay at home" rules.

But there are ways parents can help them stay healthy, says registered dietitian Audrey Koltun.

"During quarantine, we hear we should try to stay healthy, not overeat, and exercise, but it is easier said than done," said Koltun, who's also a diabetes ...

If the coronavirus pandemic slows down and schools reopen this fall, student athletes will need sports physicals and their primary care doctor is the best person to do it, according to guidelines from leading U.S. medical experts.

"Whenever possible, the sports physical should be performed in the primary care physician's office, the same place where the child receives immunizations a...

Raising a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can often be overwhelming, but one expert offers tips on how to keep stress levels down so you can stay connected to your child.

Dara Babinski, a child psychologist with Penn State Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., has spent considerable time delving into the issue.

The first thing to know, she said, is that ...

Hunkering down during the coronavirus pandemic has stressed families and raised the risk for child abuse, Penn State researchers report.

"We're very worried about children becoming more seriously injured over longer periods of time before they can get treatment," said Dr. Lori Frasier, chief of the division of child abuse pediatrics at Penn State Children's Hospital.

Data f...

Pets are stress-relievers for parents of children with autism and benefit their kids, too, a new study suggests.

On average, parents of kids with autism have higher stress levels than other moms and dads, the study authors said, so some look to pets to help them relax.

For the study, the researchers surveyed more than 700 families who have a family member with autism about t...

Having a supportive family can significantly reduce a child's future risk of major depression, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 3,200 pairs of siblings in Sweden -- including more than 600 pairs of full siblings and nearly 2,600 pairs of half-siblings -- who had at least one biological parent with depression.

Each pair of siblings was raised a...

High school students who have early start times are more likely to show up late or cut school entirely, a new study finds.

As schools across the United States think about reopening, they might want to bear this in mind.

"The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that high schools begin class after 8:30 a.m., but we know that most schools start much earlier," said resear...

They're not at school. They miss their friends. And Mom and Dad look worried. Lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic can take a toll on everyone, especially kids.

Most children are aware of what's going on at some level, said Dr. David Schonfeld, director of the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

Even toddlers pick up on...

With more American teens taking up e-cigarettes, there's a flood of products designed to allow them to vape without getting caught by parents or teachers -- and federal officials want to put a stop to it.

On Monday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced it was sending warning letters to 10 manufacturers to stop making these products targeting youth.

"The public sh...

The disruptions in daily life caused by the coronavirus pandemic could cause problems for children, but there are things parents can do to help their kids deal with the changes, experts say.

"There are major stressors that children are experiencing, such as the inability to attend school, adjusting to home school, being in the house with their family all day, not being able to see th...

With the explosion of smartphones, teens have learned to swiftly scroll and type away using only their thumbs. But the rest of their bodies are woefully inactive - and the effects are far-reaching.

Only about 1 in 4 high school students get the recommended hour a day of physical activity, according to statistics from the American Heart Association. Screen time is partially to blame, ...

Children of parents with mental illness are at increased risk for injuries, researchers report.

Risk is highest before 1 year of age, but remains elevated to age 17, according to the new study.

"Our results show there is a need for increased support to parents with mental illness, especially during the first year of life," said Alicia Nevriana. She is one of the study autho...

All hugs are not created equal -- and babies as young as 4 months are proof.

Heart rates in infants less than a year old slowed more during a hug than a hold. And the hug had a greater effect when it came from Mom or Dad rather than from a stranger, according to a study published April 7 in the journal iScience.

The findings offer some of the first proof that hugs hel...

Type 1 diabetes is a challenging, time-intensive disease that often strikes children, and new research suggests that strong family support helps improve the well-being of young adults with the condition.

The study found that young adults (under 30) with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be "flourishing" if they had good family connections. Flourishing was defined in the study as h...

At least 1 in 7 U.S. health care workers have to miss work to care for their children if the coronavirus pandemic keeps schools closed -- and their absence could result in more patient deaths, researchers say.

Teams from Yale University and Colorado State University used U.S. Census data to project the child care needs of health care workers.

"Closing schools comes with many...

Parenting a teenager can be an emotional minefield in the best of times, but the social distancing of the coronavirus pandemic could really strain young people's mental health.

Teens and young adults who are confined to home during the coronavirus pandemic face numerous disappointments, including not being able to hang out with friends, missing out on new life experiences and trying t...

The coronavirus pandemic has caught many American families in a vise.

Many parents are struggling to work from home and meet the needs of kids who are out of school and chaffing under what some consider house arrest.

"It can be easy to fall into the trap of self-blame when children are fighting, and workdays aren't going as planned," said Kathryn Boger, director of the Anxie...

In the new coronavirus reality, the family home has become the nexus of everything -- school, day care, work, social life -- and it's stressing out a lot of American parents, a new report suggests.

The report, in which almost 300 parents of kids under 12 in the United States were surveyed, found that since the pandemic was declared, 83% said their schools were closed. A quarter of...

What's the best thing you can teach your kid as the new coronavirus races around the globe? Proper hand-washing habits, a leading pediatricians' group says.

As early in life as possible, you should get your children into the habit of washing their hands often and thoroughly, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends. All day long, children are exposed to bacteria and viruses...

Stressed-out parents should reach out to others for support during the coronavirus pandemic, child health experts say.

As the number of coronavirus cases rise and families spend long periods in isolation, parents face unique financial and emotional stresses. Research shows that family stress puts kids at increased risk of abuse, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). <...

Could letting your baby cry it out mean less crying later?

A new British study suggests that's the case.

Researchers from the University of Warwick investigated the issue: They followed 178 infants and their moms over 18 months, assessing how soon and how often moms intervened when their babies cried.

The result? Babies that were left to cry it out a few times had ...

If you and the kids are staying home to avoid the coronavirus, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers this advice to help you make the best of the situation.

Make a plan. Talk to your children about daily structure, dealing with stress, and when you'll take breaks from remote work and schoolwork.

Ask teachers about online and offline educational activities for your ...

Schools are closing. Sports and other activities have been cancelled. Everything is changing. In the midst of this chaos, how do parents keep kids from stressing too much?

"For families, this is truly now hitting home," said psychologist Robin Gurwitch, from Duke University and the Center for Child and Family Health, in Durham, N.C.

"Families now need to think about how to...

Many American parents haven't talked with their young children about inappropriate touching, a new poll finds.

Experts recommend starting that discussion during a child's preschool years, but the nationwide poll of more than 1,100 parents of 2- to 9-year-olds found that less than half of parents of preschoolers and only one-quarter of those with elementary school-age children had had ...

The argument against paid maternity leave in the United States often focuses on the cost, but a new study suggests that more paid leave would not only be beneficial for families, but also for society.

In the study, researchers found that new parents with paid medical leave of 12 weeks or more were more likely to be in better mental and physical shape than those who received less paid ...

The health of both mom and dad are key to a healthy pregnancy and birth, new research finds.

In the study of nearly 786,000 births, researchers found that dads who weren't in the best of health were more likely to have preterm and low birth weight infants who spent time in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

"The study suggests that a father's health before conc...

Infants with chronic serious sleep problems may be at increased risk for anxiety and emotional disorders later in childhood, according to a new study from Australia.

"Persistent disturbed sleep during infancy may be an early indicator of a child's heightened susceptibility to later mental health difficulties -- in particular, anxiety problems," said researcher Fallon Cook and colleagu...

Busy moms and dads routinely stuff their purses and bags with every item their family might need for the day. But that creates a minefield of choking and poisoning hazards for babies and toddlers, pediatricians warn.

A purse, backpack or diaper bag can contain a hodgepodge of medications and supplements, cosmetics, hand sanitizers, candy, coins and other items that attract little hand...

Gun deaths in kids younger than 15 are 13% lower in U.S. states with gun-storage laws than in states without these regulations, a new study finds.

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital conducted a 26-year analysis of states with and without child access prevention (CAP) laws. CAP laws are in place in half of U.S. states. They're designed to protect children from accessing fi...

Mom and Dad, if you want your little ones to eat their fruit and vegetables, both of you must set an example, Finnish researchers say.

They noted that early childhood is a critical time for encouraging healthy eating habits that continue into adulthood.

Researchers surveyed 100 parents to see how they influenced their 3- to 5-year-olds to eat vegetables, fruit and berries. T...

About one-third of boys and 10% of girls in rural U.S. communities have carried a handgun, a new study finds. Many started carrying as early as sixth grade.

This study "provides evidence that youth handgun carrying in these settings is not uncommon," said lead author Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar. He is an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Publ...

Young boys whose mothers were exposed to chemicals known as phthalates while pregnant may face an increased risk for developing behaviors associated with autism, a new study warns.

Phthalates are chemicals found in many household products, including cosmetics and plastics.

The study didn't identify a heightened risk for autism per se among boys, but rather a "small" increas...

A key to your baby's asthma risk may be as close as your laundry room.

Canadian research shows that an infant's exposure to household cleaning products in the first few months of life is tied to heightened odds for asthma by age 3.

Babies may be especially vulnerable because they "typically spend 80% to 90% of their time indoors, and are especially vulnerable to chem...

If you are sometimes less than careful with your prescription medications and have young kids at home, a new study shows how easily tragedies can occur.

Researchers found that young children getting into medicines leads to about 400,000 poison center calls and 50,000 emergency department visits in the United States each year.

In more than half of these cases, medications hav...

Getting your surly teens off the couch might trigger a long-term turnaround in their moods, new research suggests.

"Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of depression by age 18," said study author Aaron Kandola, a psychiatry Ph.D. student at University College London (UCL).

"We found ...

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