Duren's Clinic Pharmacy Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Sports Medicine".

Health News Results - 146

Returning to golf, tennis or pickleball after shoulder replacement surgery shouldn't be too hard.

Healing does take time, but within a few months most people can get back to play at their pre-surgery level without the pain that they experienced before, a pair of new studies show.

"Recovery after both an anatomic and reverse shoulder replacement or from any shoulder replacement is id...

Fewer high school athletes are getting hurt playing sports, but those who do are more likely to suffer severe injuries that require surgery or a timeout from their chosen sport, new research shows.

Which teens are most at risk? Those who participate in football, girls’ soccer and boys’ wrestling, the study authors found. Knee and ankle sprains and strains, along with head injuries suc...

New research offers hope to elite athletes who have genetic heart conditions but still want to play sports.

In the new study, after a follow-up of seven years, researchers found that 95% of athletes with a diagnosed and treated genetic heart disease had no disease-triggered cardiac events. These would have included fainting or seizures, implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) shocks, sudde...

Playing sports can be good for kids of all abilities.

A leading medical organization offers some tips for getting children involved, while helping keep them safe and injury-free.

“We encourage children to play a variety of sports, both to increase their enjoyment over time and to avoid injuries we often see with overuse,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • March 4, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Spring sports season will be here soon, so it’s time to get kids ready after a winter break.

    Sports can teach valuable lessons, including teamwork, good sportsmanship, good communication, preparing for success, handling a loss, time management and the importance of doing your best, according to Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

    Pediatrician

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • February 19, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin is issuing a CPR challenge to promote use of the emergency procedure that saved his life on national television.

    Hamlin, 24, suffered cardiac arrest during a Jan. 2 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, moments after being tackled hard in the chest.

    A mo...

    The saga of Damar Hamlin's recent collapse during a football game has thrown the dangers of sports-related cardiac arrest into the spotlight.

    What about this happening to someone much older?

    A new study brings reassuring news: It’s rare for an older adult to have a sudden cardiac arrest during exercise, and those who do tend to have fewer health issues than those who experienc...

    “Move it or lose it” the saying goes, but too much exercise or playing sports can lead to overuse injuries.

    These injuries include damage to bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles due to repetitive actions, such running, throwing, biking, lifting and swimming, to name a few.

    An overuse injury can be the result of poor training techniques such as doing too much too fast; not warm...

    It’s no secret that athletic endurance and strength go hand-in-hand with a healthy heart.

    “Exercise strengthens the heart muscle, enabling it to pump a greater volume of blood with each heartbeat,” said Dr. Deepa...

    Some college athletes take longer to recover from a concussion, but a new study offers them some good news.

    They may still be able to return to play -- after one extra month of recovery, researchers report Jan. 18 in the journal Neurology.

    "Although an athlete may experience a slow or delayed recovery, there is reason to believe recovery is achievable with additional time ...

    Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin has been released from a Buffalo hospital just nine days after he suffered cardiac arrest during a Monday night football game.

    "Damar Hamlin has been discharged from Buffalo General Medical Center/Gates Vascular Institute," the Buffalo Bills team announced on

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • January 11, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin is now back in New York.

    The football player who collapsed on the field after suffering cardiac arrest during a Monday night game in Cincinnati has been released from an Ohio hospital, and will continue his recovery...

    An antidote to teenage depression might be found in school gymnasiums and on sports fields, a major new review argues.

    Supervised exercise programs are associated with significant reductions in symptoms of depression among children and teenagers, according to the analysis of data from 21 studies involving more than 2,400 kids.

    “This is the first time that we've been able to put en...

    FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2023 (HealthDay News) – While NFL safety Damar Hamlin is still critically ill after suffering cardiac arrest during a game on Monday, he is making a "fairly remarkable recovery," his doctors said during a news conference on Thursday.

    “There has been substantial improvement in his condition over t...

    Damar Hamlin, the Buffalo Bills player who collapsed Monday after suffering cardiac arrest during a game, is showing “signs of improvement,” his team said Wednesday.

    Still, the 24-year-old "is expected to remain under intensive care as his health care team continues to monitor and treat him,” the Buffalo Bills

    Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin threw himself into the path of a Cincinnati Bengals ball carrier, taking a hard hit to the chest that sent both NFL players to the ground.

    Hamlin, 24, stood to dust himself off, took two steps — and then fell flat on his back, limp and unresponsive.

    Hamlin suffered a cardiac arrest following the tough tackle in Monday night’s game, officials now...

    Skiiers and snowboarders, take note: You're less likely to get hurt if you ease back into the winter sports season.

    “We see a lot of patients in the After-Hours Clinic (of the department of orthopaedic surgery) on their way back from skiing and snowboarding,” said Dr. Sabrina Sawl...

    Former elite football players may age faster than their more average peers, a new study suggests.

    NFL players, especially former linemen, had fewer disease-free years and earlier high blood pressure and diabetes diagnoses. Two age-related diseases, arthritis and dementia, were also more commonly found in former football players than in other men of the same age.

    This research was p...

    Olympic athletes aren't like the rest of the population -- but this time it's in a far less positive way.

    Two new studies show that athletes who performed at the top of their sport have a higher risk of developing arthritis and joint pain in later life. The linked studies found that 1 in 4 former Olympians dealt with these issues.

    Those who'd been injured during their sporting caree...

    Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

    Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

    The study found similar results for other after-school...

    A particular brain wave may help diagnose concussions in high school football players and predict when it's safe for them to return to play, new research suggests.

    Delta waves are markers of brain injury and perhaps healing. They tend to decrease with age, but researchers found increased levels of these lo...

    Playing sports can benefit children in many ways, but all sports are not equal when it comes to their bones.

    New research suggests children will have healthier bones if they participate in multidirectional sports such as soccer or basketball, rather than unidir...

    Tackling drills are typically a staple of high school football practices, but new research suggests dropping them from training might cut the risk of head hits.

    Using mouth guards with sensors that recorded every head hit, researchers found players who spent 5,144 minutes in non-contact practice had just 310 head hits, while those who had nearly 7,000 minutes in high-speed training with c...

    A leading medical journal, the British Journal of Sports Medicine, has retracted nine more articles written by its former editor-in-chief and applied “expressions of concern” on 38 additional articles on which he is the sole author that were published in BMJ journals.

    This is the latest development in the investigation, which concerns possible plagiarism and misrep...

    Before the pandemic, Theodore Kleinman, then a rising high school freshman, was excited to earn his spot on the varsity track team. Aside from staying in shape, he was also looking forward to making new friends and being part of a group.

    Unfortunately, COVID shutdowns derailed those plans. Now, as a junior, the New York City teen is finally back on track -- literally and figuratively. "I ...

    At some schools, grassy sports fields have been replaced by easier-to-maintain synthetic turf.

    But it turns out that may be more likely to cause player injuries.

    Noting that synthetic turf football fields have been associated with more ankle and knee injuries, medical stude...

    New research suggests you can add rugby players to the list of professional athletes who face a significantly heightened risk of brain diseases following years of intense contact play.

    “This latest work under our FIELD program of research demonstrates that risk of

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • October 7, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Sometimes allergies can lead to pink, irritated eyes. But allergic conjunctivitis, or "pink eye" may have a simple fix: physical fitness.

    That's the conclusion of researchers in Taiwan who tracked health data of more than 1.2 million children. The kids were examined at age ...

    Even being young and athletic doesn't protect against a vascular disorder.

    People experiencing arm pain may have something called thoracic outlet syndrome, a disease that o...

    Professional fighters take a lot of knocks to the head, but a new study suggests they may find themselves thinking more clearly again after they retire.

    Many studies have pointed to the perils of repeated blows to the head in sports like boxing and football.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 15, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • As high school sports get underway this fall, sports medicine specialists remind athletes, parents and coaches that concussions can be challenging to diagnose.

    Dr. Sean Bradley, a primary care sports medicine physician at Ochsn...

    A rule requiring high school girls who play lacrosse to wear protective headgear is paying big dividends in Florida.

    Their risk of concussion is lower than that of players in states without such a mandate,

  • By Marianne (Consumer)Madeiros HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 25, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Kids can take part in sports while on vegetarian and vegan diets, but parents and caregivers must help them select foods that will fuel them and meet their nutrition needs.

    Vegan athletes can become deficient in vitamin B12, vitamin D, long-chain omega-3 fats, riboflavin and calcium, so it's important to find good substitutes, said Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian at Baylor College ...

    Pro athletes appear to be regularly turning to intravenous (IV) nutritional drips to alleviate fatigue and speed recovery, despite the potential risks and without solid proof of any real benefit.

    Normally, such needle-inserted drips are supposed to be reserved for treating a serious illness like anemia, or in an emergency situation such as severe dehydration.

    Unless an exemption is ...

    Taking part in certain sports in high school may lead to misuse of prescription stimulants in the years after graduation, a new study finds.

    It reported that high school seniors who play contact sports are 50% more likely to abuse prescription stimulants in their 20s. Seniors who take part in any sport are more likely than those who don't to abuse these drugs, said lead author Philip Veli...

    American kids who are poor or members of ethnic minority groups are missing out on the youth sports that have long been touted for building strong bodies and strong character, a new study reports.

    It found that youngsters who are poor, or from Black or Hispanic households are less likely to take part in organized sports than their white peers.

    Across the U.S., 54% of 6- to 17-year-o...

    As a new school year begins, many students return to their favorite sports or try something new.

    Encouraging kids to make physical activity part of their lives has lifelong benefi...

    Pickleball has become a wildly popular sport for older Americans, but seniors who enjoy playing it should know about potential injuries and how to avoid them.

    The most common problem is with the rotator cuff tendon in the shoulder, which can cause pain. Issues can included

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 6, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Medical and recreational marijuana use has surged across the United States as more states legalize the drug, but young female athletes may want to think twice before taking a toke.

    A new study from the University of Northern Colorado connects regular cannabis use in fit young wome...

    Adults who tear a key ligament in the knee can fare well with a less extensive type of surgery, preliminary research suggests.

    The study involved patients treated for a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a strong band of tissue that helps stabilize the knee joi...

    When former professional Major League Soccer (MLS) player Scott Vermillion died at age 44, he had stage 2 CTE, his family announced Tuesday.

    He is the first former MLS player diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Vermillion died from an accidental overdose in December 2020.

    "Th...

    New research confirms the dangers of too much screen time for kids and teens: Those who play sports, take music lessons, or socialize with friends after school are happier and healthier than children who are glued to a screen during these hours.

    "Scr...

    Kids who play team sports may win some mental health benefits, but the same may not hold true for those in solo sports, a large, new study suggests.

    A number of previous studies have linked team sports to better mental well-being for children and teenagers, and the new...

    The football gridiron and the boxing ring have come to be understood as danger zones for the brain, with repetitive hits to the head causing long-term damage to some athletes.

    The same might be true of the MMA octagon as well, a new study says.

    The more that participants in mixed martial arts spar in ...

    If your teens play just one sport, new research suggests you might want to encourage them to try others.

    Researchers report that focusing solely on one sport puts high school athletes at increased risk for injuries and burnout.

    The investigators surveyed 975 U.S. high school athletes and found that more than 1 in 5 had a high level of specialization in one sport, while more than 42%...

    As youth spring sports kick into high gear, it's important to know about injury prevention and treatment, an expert says.

    Injury risks and preventive measures can vary by sport, according to Dr. Marcus Knox, a physical therapist in the department of orthopedic surgery at B...

    College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

    Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

    A ruptured Achilles tendon can reduce a weekend warrior to a limping one. And there's no single right way to treat it.

    People who've suffered this common injury may fare just as well with physical therapy as with surgery, a new clinical trial shows.

    Outdoor sports season is nearly here, and with rough play comes the risk of concussion.

    But one of the most-used tools to assess sports-related concussion from the sidelines isn't as precise as one might like, a new study a...

    As sign-ups for youth football get underway this spring, a new study reveals that Americans may love their football, but half now believe that kids should not play the tackle version of the game.

    The researchers found that of nearly 4,000 U.S. adults surveyed, only 45% agreed that tackle football is an "appropriate sport for kids to play." Half disagreed, while the remaining 5% were unsur...