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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

28 Apr

More than 40% of Adults with ADHD Report Excellent Mental Health, Study Finds

Two out of five adults with ADHD meet the criteria for excellent mental health, including being free of mental illness and feeling almost daily happiness, researchers say.

27 Aug

A Mentally Challenging Job Could Be Good for Your Health

Being mentally stimulated at work may help lower your risk of dementia, researchers say.

15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

Health News Results - 874

Is an upcoming final exam or big-time job interview stressing you out?

Hug your honey.

That's the takeaway from new research that showed how embracing your significant other can help calm women.

But sorry, guys, the same isn't true for you, according to the study published May 18 in the journal PLOS ONE.

"As a woman, hugging your romantic partner can prevent t...

Will it be a cheeseburger or a salad? What will they think of me?

A new study finds you're more likely to choose to eat healthy if you're with an "outsider" because you don't want them to have a poor opinion of you.

The study consisted of a series of experiments with several hundred adults in a large...

Many people who get a diagnosis for one mental illness may find they have additional psychiatric conditions, and new genetic research offers an explanation why.

A number of mental illnesses share genetic similarities, researchers found. This discovery helps explain why multiple conditions are common among people with psychiatric disorders, the investigators pointed out in a new study.

...

Narcissists' belief that it's 'all about them' can make them less likely to wear a mask or get vaccinated during the pandemic, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed data gathered from 1,100 U.S. adults in March 2021. They were asked about their mask use and vaccination views and behaviors, and they also completed assessments to measure their levels of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 16, 2022
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  • Americans' rates of depression and anxiety spiked during the first year of the pandemic, but the increases were much more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian people than among white people, new research shows.

    From April 2020 to April 2021, the overall incidence of depression or

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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  • It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • Does science sell? Sometimes.

    Using science to sell chocolate chip cookies and other yummy products is likely to backfire, a new study shows, but touting scientific research behind more practical, everyday items -- such as body wash -- can be an effective marketing strategy.

    "People see science as cold, but competent. That doesn’t pair well with products designed to be warm and ...

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

    "

    Babies born to women who are stressed out during pregnancy may be more likely to experience social, emotional and learning problems as they grow up, new research suggests.

    "Mom's elevated psychological distress affects not just her, but her unborn baby's brain development," said st...

    Mom's voice may be music to a young child's brain, but the teen brain prefers to change the station, a new study finds.

    Past research using brain imaging has revealed how important a mother's voice is to younger children: The sound stimulates not only hearing-related parts of the brain, but also circuits involved in emotions and "reward" — in a way strange voices simply do ...

    If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

    "If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better environment for the treatment to be effective than if you're going to a poor neighborhood with other problems," said stu...

    As the pandemic unfolded, nations adopted diverse methods to contain COVID-19. Some sought to eliminate the virus, targeting zero community transmission. Others tried to slow transmission through a mix of intermittent lockdowns, workplace, business and school closings, social distancing, the wearing of face masks, and the cancellation of public gatherings and public transport.

    Efforts to...

    Two in five adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder say their mental health is excellent, which is significantly lower than people without the disorder, but still an encouraging finding, according to the authors of a new study.

    Their analysis of a Canadian government mental health surve...

    Showing highway death tolls on roadside message boards in a bid to curb crashes may actually cause more accidents, a new study suggests.

    That's because they distract drivers, the researchers said.

    At least 27 states have used s...

    The future of diagnosing and targeting treatments for serious mental health disorders may include MRI brain scans.

    Researchers in the United Kingdom found that brain scans enabled them to identify which patients with major depression or

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 18, 2022
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  • You've battled and beaten back a bout of cancer, so now you can take comfort in your victory, right?

    Wrong, claims new research that found most cancer patients and survivors fear their disease will return once treatment end...

    Certain personality traits may make older adults more or less vulnerable to waning memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 2,000 older adults, found that those high on the "conscientious" scale — organized, self-disciplined and productive — were less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. That refers to subtler problems with memory and other mental...

    Psilocybin — the active component in "magic mushrooms" — may help rewire the brains of people with depression.

    Psychedelics including psilocybin have shown promise in treating many mental health disorders in recent years, and a new study is among the first to begin to unravel precisely how they work.

    <...

    With the advent of smartphones came the rise of selfies, shared daily by "like"-seeking millions across social media.

    But a small new study suggests that, unlike photos taken with regular cameras, smartphone selfies distort facial features in a not-so-flattering way. And those unappealing — if inaccurate — results may be fueling a hankering for

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 8, 2022
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  • If you've ever wondered how your pooch flashes those "puppy dog eyes" that melt your heart, a new study may provide some answers.

    The researchers identified certain muscle features that help dogs look so cute, and it suggests that thousands of years of selective breeding have contributed to their ability to use expressions to their advantage.

    "Dogs are unique from other mammals in t...

    Health care workers battling the pandemic may be suffering moral traumas at a rate similar to soldiers in a war zone, a new study suggests.

    The pandemic has brought a stream of stories about overtaxed health care workers, facing repeated COVID surges, resource shortages and public resistance to the vaccines that can keep people out of the hospital. Workers' distress is often called burnou...

    Gun violence can cause significant, long-lasting mental harm to survivors and their families, according to a new study.

    In the year after their injury, survivors are at increased risk for pain, mental health and substance use disorders. Their family members also have higher likelihood for mental health issues. Both victim and loved ones have the added burden of higher health care costs, <...

    Kids today feel more pressured by their parents' high expectations, and that may be feeding a rise in perfectionism, a new study suggests.

    Some people claim the title "perfectionist" ...

    If you're recovering from a significant injury or illness, a rehabilitation therapist could be a big help in getting back to your normal daily life, according to experts.

    "You don't get a manual that comes with your injury that tells you how to navigate returning to your usual pattern of functioning," said Brigid Waldron-Perrine, a rehabilitation psychologist at Michigan Medicine-Universi...

    Taking a stroll through a city park can give your mood a significant boost, but parks in some cities provide a bigger benefit than those in others, researchers say.

    In a new study, investigators measured the

    It takes a lot of will to successfully lose weight, but a new research review suggests that "motivational" conversations with a health provider may make little difference.

    The review looked at studies that tested the effects of

    Heart attack survivors with depression have an increased risk of stroke, and more research is needed to find out why, according to the authors of a new study.

    "There could be a multitude of de...

    Living in a noisy neighborhood may not only cost you sleep, it could also increase your odds for a heart attack, researchers say.

    They concluded that 1 in 20 heart attacks in New Jersey were associated with noise from highways, trains and air traffic.

    "When people talk about pollution, they're usually talking about particles in the air or water," said lead author Dr. Abel Moreyra, a...

    Psilocybin, the psychedelic substance in "magic" mushrooms, is generating lots of interest as a potential treatment for a host of mental ills, but new research warns there is little data on how it might interact with more traditional psychiatric medications.

    "There's a major incongruence between the public enthusiasm and exuberance with psychedelic substances for mental health issues — ...

    The party drug "ecstasy" might be the key to helping people heal from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new clinical trial results indicate.

    In a small study, PTSD patients treated with a powerful combination of the psychedelic drug, also known as MDMA, and talk therapy were much more likely to...

    Scars from facial surgery look worse to skin cancer patients themselves than to others, so it's important for surgeons to prepare patients beforehand, researchers say.

    Doctors can help by outlining the healing process and explaining what their scars will look like in the weeks after surgery, the study authors suggested.

    "Our research seems to support the saying 'we are our own worst...

    Would you know if your teen was struggling with mental health issues?

    Most parents say yes, but many also doubt their teen would tell them something was wrong, a new poll shows.

    Specifically, nearly 95% of the parents surveyed said they were somewhat or very confident that they would notice the signs of trouble. Yet, only about 25% think their adolescent would definitely talk to th...

    Problem drinking led to more than 232 million missed work days a year in the United States before the pandemic, and the situation likely became worse with more people working at home, a new study suggests.

    Alcohol use disorder is a major problem in the Unite...

    Using medical marijuana to treat pain, anxiety or depression may quickly lead to dependence, without relieving symptoms, a new study suggests.

    Those most at risk for misusing medical marijuana are patients using it to treat anxiety and depression, the researchers found. Based on these findings, the b...

    Most brain studies that rely on MRI scans don't include enough people to provide trustworthy results, researchers say.

    These brain-wide association studies use MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to see how brain structure and function connect with personality, behavior, thinking, neurological conditions ...

    The COVID-19 pandemic has been tough on America's teachers, and nearly half of those recently surveyed said they're thinking about quitting their jobs or switching schools.

    Enforcing mask-wearing and pivoting to remote learning hasn't been easy. But many teachers and other school staff have also endur...

    People who have severe COVID-19 are at higher risk for depression and other mental woes that can last more than a year, a large study suggests.

    Researchers reported that COVID patients who were bedridden but not hospitalized for a week or more can experience depression, anxiet...

    They're cute and expressive, but using lots of emojis in your communications at work could lower your standing among your colleagues, a new study suggests.

    The researchers conducted a series of experiments with hundreds of Americans and found that employees who use pictures and emojis in emails, Zoom profiles, or even company logos on T-shirts are perceived as less powerful than those who...

    People who die by suicide with a gun are challenging to assist beforehand, and different from those who kill themselves using other means, a new study finds.

    "Those who died using a firearm were more likely to have disclosed their suicidal thoughts to other people in the month preceding their death, but it is not clear who they spoke to," said lead study author Allie Bond. She is a doctor...

    Even "safe" levels of ozone air pollution may increase adolescents' risk of depression, a new study shows.

    Researchers analyzed four years of mental health data from 213 adolescents, ages 9-13, in the San Francisco Ba...

    Inflation, Russia's invasion of Ukraine and continuing concerns about money and COVID-19 have Americans more stressed than ever, a new poll conducted last week reveals.

    The biggest concerns: rising costs of food, energy and other everyday items due to inflation (87%); supply chain issues (81%); global uncertainty (81%); Russia's invasion of Ukraine (80%), and potential Russian cyberattack...

    A day that includes a trip to the emergency room is probably a high-stress one, but man's best friend could help you cope, new research finds.

    The study found a reduction in pain, anxiety and depression that ranged from 43% to 48% in patients who were treated with a visit from a trained

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  • March 10, 2022
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  • Could hugging a soft, mechanized pillow that simulates slow breathing help test-stressed students ward off anxiety and stress? British researchers are betting on it.

    The pillow in question looks like any typical cushion, noted study author Alice Haynes. She's a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

    But when hugged, the light blue plush cushion deploys ...

    U.S. National Guard soldiers are at heightened risk for problem drinking after military deployment, but less likely to receive help with their alcohol struggles than active-duty service members, a new study finds.

    Exposure to combat during deployment was the strongest risk factor for problem drinking among the reservists in the study, according to the report published online March 8 in th...

    The stories and images flowing out of Ukraine as it defends itself against a Russian invasion are gut-wrenching: Families lugging just a suitcase while crossing the border to safety in Poland in tears; bombed out apartments with people still hiding amid the wreckage; unlucky citizens losing their...

    About one-quarter of Americans say they made positive changes to their daily habits during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll shows.

    As U.S. states ended masking mandates and infection numbers dropped this year, most (64%) respondents said their mood had been stable since January and that the ...

    Here's more evidence of the toll that COVID-19 takes on the human brain: A new study finds biomarkers of neuron damage and brain inflammation in the blood are associated with brain function changes in both hospitalized COVID-19 patients and people with long COVID.

    Combined blood biomarker ...

    For two decades, the death rate from opioid overdoses was higher among white Americans than Black Americans. But that changed in 2020, signaling an end to the notion that the overdose crisis is a "white problem."

    Using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found that overdose deaths jumped nearly 49% among Black people in the United States from 2019 to...

    Antidepressants don't always help ease depression and anxiety in pregnant women and new moms, according to a new study.

    "This is the first longitudinal data to show that many pregnant women report depression and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy and postpartum, despite their choice to continue treatment with antidepressants," said senior author Dr. Katherine Wisner. She directs the Asher ...

    President Joe Biden has announced a new plan to expand mental health and drug abuse treatment that would devote millions to suicide prevention, mental health services for youth and community clinics providing 24/7 crisis care.

    Health insurers would also have to cover three mental health visits a year at no added cost to patients under the plan, which was introduced during Biden's State of...

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