Duren's Clinic Pharmacy Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Stroke".

08 Jun

Insomnia May Raise Your Risk for Stroke, New Study Finds

People who have insomnia symptoms, such as trouble falling asleep and waking up in the middle of the night, may face greater odds of stroke, according to researchers.

Health News Results - 477

Girls whose periods begin before the age of 13 are at higher risk of becoming adult women with diabetes, compared to girls who start menstruation later, new research shows.

An earlier onset of periods also appears to hike a woman's odds for stroke before the age of 65, the same study found.

Why the link? According to the research team at Tulane University in New Orleans, exposure to...

Lab-grown blood vessels are providing new insight into how damage to the tiny vessels in the brain can cause them to leak, contributing to dementia and stroke.

Even better, this research has identified a drug target that could plug these leaks and potentially reduce a person’s risk of brain-damaging blood vessel leaks.

Antibiotic and anti-cancer drugs that inhibit a class of bioch...

Cutting out just one teaspoon of salt every day lowers blood pressure almost as much as medication does, new research shows.

Investigators said theirs is one of the largest studies ever to include people taking high blood pressure meds in a look at the effect of reducing dietary intake of sodium.

“We found that 70-75% of all people, regardless of whether they are already on blood ...

Women and their doctors have long known that taking birth control pills can elevate the risk for a blood clot.

Now, some good news: That added risk will disappear within a few weeks of stopping an oral contraceptive, a new study shows.

“It’s reassuring to know that that possible harm of the pill goes away rapidly when one stops taking it," said study corresponding author

Strokes can strike anyone, but income and education may play a role in whether your stroke is fatal or disabling, new research shows.

As reported Nov. 8 in the journal Neurology, folks who'd had a stroke were 10% more likely to die or become dependent on someone for their care if they were low-income or less educated.

Study lead author

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • November 9, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • There's your calendar age, and then there's what scientists call your "biological" age, which is based on various measurements indicating good or not-so-good health.

    Now, new Swedish research finds that less healthy folks, with a biological age that outstrips their chronological age, may be at higher odds for dementia and stroke.

    “But because people age at different rates, chrono...

    In some big cities, mobile stroke units can deliver a powerful clot-busting drug to patients as these specialized ambulances speed to the hospital.

    Now, a new study shows these units deliver anti-clotting treatment a median of 37 minutes faster than when traditional ambulances drive stroke patients to the ER. And that extra time gives stroke victims better chances of averting the stroke o...

    As sweltering summer days become more common, the number of Americans who die of heat-related heart problems or strokes could soar over the next few decades, a new study projects.

    The study -- published Oct. 30 in the journal Circulation -- estimates that by mid-century the United States will see thos...

    A variety of risks can make it more likely that someone develops Alzheimer's disease or other dementias.

    Now you can add neighborhood environment to that list. A new study finds low income levels and a lack of green spaces are among the factors that can harm brain health.

    “Social determinants of health have a major impact on cognition, as well as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular...

    Teenage boys who have high blood pressure may find themselves on the road to serious heart problems in adulthood.

    Swedish researchers found that boys who had high blood pressure at 18 were at risk for heart failure, heart attacks, strokes and death as adults. And the risk began when blood pressure crossed 120/80 mm Hg, a normal reading.

    "Hopefully, the results of this ...

    Any head injury — even a mild one — raises a person's risk of later having an ischemic stroke.

    Having multiple injuries increases that risk, even more so than the severity of a single traumatic brain injury (TBI), researchers report.

    "Our study found that those who experience two or more head injuries, including even mild head injuries, are at higher risk of subsequent ischemic...

    If you've had a heart attack, your doctor likely told you to take a low-dose aspirin daily to stave off a second heart attack or stroke, but most people don't follow through with this advice over the long-term.

    Those folks who don't take daily low-dose aspirin consistently are more likely to have another heart attack, stroke or die compared with their counterparts who consistently take as...

    When people suffering a stroke need a transfer to another hospital, time is of the essence. But a new study finds that most Americans in that situation face delays.

    The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked at the issue of "door-in, door-out"...

    For years, older adults took a baby aspirin a day to help ward off a first-time heart attack or stroke. Now yet another study is showing the risks are not worth it for most.

    Specifically, researchers found the risk of brain bleeding while using low-dose aspirin outweighed any potential benefit against stroke for relatively healthy older adults -- that is, those with no history of heart di...

    Despite worse symptoms and living about the same distance from comprehensive stroke centers, women with a severe type of stroke are less likely to be sent to these facilities than men, a new study reveals.

    Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston found women with what's called a large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke were about 9% less likely than men...

    It doesn't matter if you exercise every day or squeeze it all into the weekend. If you do the recommended 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, you'll get heart benefits, a new study finds.

    Both regimens protect you from atrial fibrillation (a-fib), heart attack, heart failure and stroke, compared with inactivity, researchers reported in the July 18 issue of the <...

    Could a grocery cart save lives by preventing possible strokes? It just might.

    The notion stems from a new British study in which grocery cart handles were embedded with electrocardiogram (EKG) sensors.

    The goal: to screen shoppers for undiagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), the most common heart rhythm disorder.

    “Atrial fibrillation is a leading cause of stroke,...

    Having inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, could mean having a higher long-term risk of stroke, according to a new study.

    People with IBD are 13% more likely to have a stroke up to 25 years after their diagnosis than those without the condition, the researchers found. Their report was published June 14 in the journal Neurology.

    “These results show that people with inflamm...

    Women who've had certain pregnancy complications have significantly higher odds for a stroke than women with uncomplicated pregnancies, new research shows.

    Moreover, these strokes may occur at a relatively early age, according to investigators at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

    Also, compared to women with a single uncomplicated pregnancy, w...

    Worldwide deaths from the most common type of stroke have risen significantly in the past three decades and will increase even more sharply in the years ahead, researchers say.

    Ischemic stroke deaths grew from 2 million in 1990 to more than 3 million in 2019. They are expected to reach nearly 5 million by 2030, according to a report published online May 17 in the journal Neurology.

    Having higher blood sugar can lead to quicker loss of brain power after a stroke, a new study suggests.

    High blood pressure and cholesterol were not associated with a similar mental loss, even in those at higher genetic risk for dementia.

    “Having a stroke increases a person's risk of dementia up to 50-fold, but we lack a comprehensive treatment approach that could reduce this risk...

    Physical activity after a stroke may be crucial to a more successful recovery, according to a study by Swedish researchers.

    They found that patients who increased and sustained their exercise in the six months after their stroke were functioning better than those who didn't.

    "People who have experienced a stroke can gain functional benefits by increasing physical activity, regardle...

    Long periods of immobility can put people at risk of dangerous blood clots — yet hibernating bears lie around for months without any problem. Now scientists think they've figured out why.

    The researchers hope the insight can eventually lead to new drugs for preventing life-threatening blood clots — the kind that begin in the legs but can travel to the brain and cause a stroke, or to t...

    Sleep problems — from snoring to sleeping too much or too little — may be associated with elevated stroke risk, researchers say.

    Snorting during sleep, having poor quality of sleep and sleep apnea may also be linked with greater risk of stroke, according to study findings published online April 5 in the journal Neurology.

    “Not only do our results suggest that individu...

    After six weeks of in-patient treatment at Walter Reed National MIlitary Medical Center, Sen. John Fetterman is back home in western Pennsylvania and in remission from depression.

    Fetterman will return to the Senate when Congress reconvenes April 17 after a recess. The Pennsylvania senator had been hospitalized since Feb. 15....

    When a loved one suffers a stroke, it can be a relief that they survived and are getting good care.

    But recovery can take time for the patient.

    Making sure they get the care they need can be a challenge for the spouse, grown child or other loved one who is providing that care at home.

    Fortunately, resources exist to help you through this difficult time while taking the best c...

    While the idea of getting 10,000 steps a day is bandied about as a good walking goal, that can be intimidating to some people, depending on how fit they are.

    Now, new research in adults between the ages of 70 and 90 finds that a much smaller number of steps can make a difference in heart health.

    It's possible, according to researchers, that just 3,000 steps a day has benefit...

    Sen. John Fetterman will continue to be away from the U.S. Senate for several weeks but he is on the "path to recovery," his spokesman said Monday.

    The senator is being treated for clinical depression at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after checking himself in on Feb. 15.

    “We understand the intense interest in John's status and especially appreciate the flood of wel...

    It's a brutal reality that confronts many recovering stroke patients: After six months or so of rehab, any arm and hand movement not yet restored is unlikely to return.

    But new cutting-edge research aims to use electrical stimulation to jumpstart stroke-interrupted communication betw...

    Many things can make your heart skip a beat — the words to a song, a case of the nerves or a near car accident — but these temporary palpitations aren't usually cause for concern.

    But much more serious, and sometimes deadly, things can throw off the heart's rhythm, including dehydration, a history of heart disease or a heart defect. Medications, intense exertion or anxiety can also t...

    Using a "neuroprotectant" drug alongside the standard surgical removal of a clot may slash the risk of death and disability following a stroke, a new study finds.

    The new medication, called ApTOLL, shields brain tissue from continuing damage by cooling down inflammation, the researchers said.

    A stroke occurs when blood supply to part of the brain is blocked by a clot or when a ...

    About 20% of people who survive what's called an ischemic stroke have irregular heart rhythms, which can lead to another stroke, researchers say.

    But in cases where the stroke was caused by hardening of the arteries, patients aren't adequately monitored for atrial fibrillation (a-fib, the most common heart rhythm abnormality) after discharge, said lead study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • February 9, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Having a stroke is a life-altering experience, and complications can crop up afterwards, but a new study finds the color of your skin may determine whether you are treated for them.

    In the year following a stroke, Black and Hispanic patients were not treated for common complications as often as white patients were, researchers found.

    "Black patients were less likely to receive...

    Taking good care of your teeth -- brushing, flossing, regular dental checkups -- is, of course, important for good health. Now researchers say it's also vital for brain health.

    While it was already clear that poor dental health could increase stroke and heart disease risk, a new study funds that adults who are genetically prone to have cavities, dentures and missing teeth are also more li...

    U.S. stroke deaths have dramatically declined in the past several decades. But, researchers caution, their new study also found the potential for a resurgence.

    “After nearly four decades of declining stroke-related mortality, the risk appears to be increasing in the United States. Our research underscores the need for novel strategies to combat this alarming trend,” said lead study au...

    Singing may help stroke patients regain communication skills, according to new research.

    About 40% of stroke survivors have aphasia, a difficulty to deliver or comprehend spoken or written language. That impairment is ongoing for about half of those patients a year after their stroke, potentially affecting quality of life or leading to social isolation.

    Researchers in Finland studie...

    Stress is rarely a good thing for your health, but new research warns that it significantly raises the risk of a stroke.

    The study found that increased stress at home or work and recent stressful life events — like getting divorced or a major family conflict — were associated both with increased risk of stroke due to a clot, known as an ischemic stroke, and a stroke due to bleeding in...

    Imagine living day-to-day with one hand that feels like it's a baseball mitt, or another that feels like a small clutching claw.

    That's the experience of many stroke survivors who suffer from chronic pain, according to a new study in the journal Brain Sciences.

    Stroke survivors living with chronic pain ...

    Statins may do more than help your heart: New research shows the cholesterol-lowering drugs may also lower your risk for a bleeding stroke.

    An intracerebral hemorrhage, which involves bleeding in the brain, comprises about 15% to 30% of strokes, according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. It is also the most deadly. With this type of stroke, arteries or veins rupture, ...

    Two people have now died from brain hemorrhages that may be linked to an experimental Alzheimer's drug, calling into question the medication's safety.

    A 65-year-old woman with early-stage Alzheimer's recently died from a massive brain bleed that some researchers link to lecanemab, an antibody drug designed to bind to and remove amyloid-beta from the brain, according to a report published ...

    It might seem like guns would be the biggest safety concern for hunters, but there's another real danger.

    The possibility of having a heart attack or stroke while hunting is higher with the combination of physical exertion, excitement and cold air constricting blood vessels, experts say.

    Hunters should know

    When someone has a stroke, many professionals come together to help the patient recover.

    The rehabilitation plan varies depending on which parts of the body were affected by the stroke and the type...

    Many language skills are "left brain," but a new study shows that when a newborn suffers a stroke in that region, the brain is able to shift those language duties to the right.

    The researchers said the findings highlight the striking malleabil...

    Too few children with sickle cell anemia are getting the recommended screening tests for stroke, a common complication of this disease, a new government report finds.

    What's more, many aren't receiving

  • By Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 21, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • New research suggests that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may trigger more than just psychiatric complications: Adults suffering from ADHD may also be more likely to develop some type of cardiovascular disease.

    "Clinicians need to c...

    The risk of suffering a stroke at an early age may depend partly on a person's blood type, a large study suggests.

    When it comes to the risk of ischemic stroke — the kind caused by a blood clot — studies have hinted that blood type plays a ...

    COVID-19 vaccines do not increase your risk for stroke, new research shows, but severe COVID infection does, and experts hope the finding will ease the concerns of those who are hesitant to get the shot.

    “We now know that patients who've had a vaccine are not at higher risk of stroke, thanks to a large body of data with millions of patients who have been included,” said Dr. Alexis Sim...

    A smartphone video could detect a blocked blood vessel in your neck that could cause a stroke, a new study suggests.

    The American Heart Association says videos may provide a non-invasive way to screen people who are at risk of stroke.

    Nearly 87% of strokes are the ischemic type, which happens when fatty depos...

    Swapping salt out for the salt substitute potassium chloride lowers blood pressure, and thereby the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular disease, a new analysis finds.

    "It's in processed and prepared foods where most people in developed countries get their salt," explained senior researc...

    A potentially dangerous change in heart rhythm is common after surgeries that don't involve the heart, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.

    Dr. Konstantinos Siontis and colleagues studied patients who had atrial fibrillation (a-fib) after a noncardiac surgical procedure. These patients represent about 13% ...

    Show All Health News Results