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Health News Results - 124

Kids who don't get enough sleep may be at risk for ADHD, anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, researchers report.

"If we make sure our children get enough sleep, it can help protect them from mental health problems," said researcher Bror Ranum, a doctoral candidate at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.

The study followed nearl...

A new trial confirms that the drug selumetinib shrinks tumors in children suffering from neurofibromatosis type 1.

The condition is characterized by changes in skin coloring and the growth of tumors along nerves in the skin, brain and other parts of the body. The tumors cause disfigurement, limitations on strength and range of motion, and pain.

The tumors are hard to treat,...

Chronic pain can keep kids from being social and active, leading to anxiety and depression, a child psychiatrist says.

Unfortunately, this can turn into a vicious cycle -- worsening depression and anxiety can also worsen pain perception.

Between 5% and 20% of children live with chronic pain. It usually takes the form of bone and muscle pain, headaches or abdominal pa...

If you child has allergies or asthma, you need to take that into consideration when selecting a summer camp.

"Parents and kids alike who are dealing with asthma or severe allergies need to know there's a good fit and that the child's medical needs are being met," said Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

"Take the time to...

An expandable artificial heart valve could save children with congenital heart disease from repeated open heart surgeries as they grow up, researchers report.

Current artificial heart valves are fixed in size, meaning children need to get larger ones as they grow. Children who receive their first artificial valve before age 2 will require up to five open-heart operations before they ...

Grandparents can be a bad influence on kids' weight, researchers say.

That's the upshot of an analysis of 23 studies conducted in the United States and eight other countries by a team from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

The study found that kids who were cared for by grandparents had nearly 30% higher odds for being overweight or obese.

With stories about the new coronavirus outbreak flooding the media, it's easy to get scared. And if you're scared, your kids might be, too -- but they don't have to be.

Honesty and directness are key when talking to your child about this new virus, said Diane Bales, associate professor of human development and family science at the University of Georgia, in Athens.

To reliev...

Diabetes among U.S. youths continued to rise from 2002 to 2015, especially for Asian children and teens, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed type 1 and type 2 diabetes among 5- to 19-year-olds. They found rates were generally higher in blacks and Hispanics than in whites. Surprisingly, the rate in Asian/Pacific Islanders rose faster than in all other racial ethnic groups.

Researchers who have pinpointed an antibody linked to life-threatening autoimmune disorders in children say their discovery could lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of these patients.

The investigators identified the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody in their study of 535 children with central nervous system demyelinating disorders and encephalitis.

MOG ...

Migraine drugs that might work for adults won't prevent the debilitating headaches in kids and teens, a new study shows.

A number of drugs are used to prevent migraines, but treatment of youngsters has largely been based on the results of adult studies, the international team of researchers pointed out.

What really works in kids? To find out, the researchers reviewed 23 stu...

Fiberglass and plaster casts are widely used to treat broken bones in kids, but they have drawbacks compared with other methods such as braces and splints, experts say.

Doctors and patients should review the available options, considering not only treatment of the fracture, but also patient comfort and compliance as well as the burden on the family, according to a review article in th...

This flu season is hitting children particularly hard, but new research shows that a flu shot is still well worth it for these youngest patients.

Getting vaccinated halved the risk of hospitalization for flu-related complications among young kids, scientists found.

The researchers analyzed vaccination data from more than 3,700 children, ages 6 months to 8 years, who were adm...

Young school-aged children with behavior problems may have different bacteria in their guts than their well-behaved peers, new research suggests.

The study also noted that parents may play a key role in development of the particular bacteria in their child's gut (collectively known as the microbiome). That role even extends beyond the type of foods parents give their children, resear...

Since the 1970s, serious heart disease among childhood cancer survivors had declined remarkably, a new study finds.

The decline suggests that efforts to make cancer treatments, including radiation, less toxic are paying off, researchers say.

For the study, researchers led by Dr. Daniel Mulrooney, from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., collected data ...

Severe deprivation in childhood can lead to a smaller-than-normal brain, lower IQ and attention deficits in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed MRI brain scans of 67 young adults, ages 23 to 28, who were institutionalized as children in Romania during the Communist regime. They had spent between 3 and 41 months in institutions, where they were often malnourishe...

Regardless of their family's insurance status, many children get medical care they don't need, a new study suggests.

One in 11 publicly insured and 1 in 9 privately insured children in the United States were given what the researchers called unnecessary, "low-value" care in 2014, the researchers report.

"While we found that publicly insured children were a little more likel...

Kids in poor countries are up to 200 times more likely to die after surgery than kids in rich nations, a new study finds.

As the need for pediatric surgery grows in poor and moderate-income countries, it leaves 2 billion children without access to safe surgery and anesthesia, said researcher Dr. Mark Newton. He's a pediatric anesthesiologist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital a...

Microbes that live in a child's upper airway could be linked to severe asthma attacks, new research suggests.

For parents, it's an all-too familiar scene: A child's seemingly harmless cough quickly escalates to wheezing, gasping and an urgent need for emergency treatment. Asthma is the leading chronic disease in kids and third-most common cause of hospitalization among those under 15,...

If new research is any indication, tougher vaccine exemption laws work.

After California eliminated nonmedical exemptions from vaccinations in 2016, the number of children receiving recommended immunizations rose -- especially in counties where "vaccine hesitancy" runs high, a new analysis found.

The policy -- passed in response to outbreaks of measles and other "old" childh...

As an early flu season spreads its misery across the United States, new research shows that few child care centers require children or their adult caregivers to get a flu shot.

Flu can be especially dangerous for children, who have a greater risk than adults for serious complications, hospitalization and even death, the researchers noted.

"When ki...

Toddlers have an increased risk of allergies if they are exposed to multiple indoor pollutants in their first years of life, a new study finds.

It included 108 mother-child pairs. Researchers assessed exposures to various household pollutants such as pet dander and tobacco smoke while the women were pregnant, then when children were aged 6 months, 1 year and 2 years.

A skin ...

Despite a growing need for mental health care for children and teens -- including a rise in youth suicide -- many areas of the United States lack any child psychiatrists, new research reports.

The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist.

"There are about 17 million children in the United States with a mental health...

Giving antihistamines to a child suffering a potentially fatal allergic reaction may do more harm than good if it causes a delay in emergency treatment, a new study warns.

Researchers reviewed the medical records of young patients, aged 8 months to 20 years, who were admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit for treatment of anaphylaxis between July 2015 and January 2019.

...

There are many unanswered questions about the long-term safety and impacts of artificial sweeteners in children, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says.

The AAP statement also recommends that the amount of artificial sweeteners should be listed on product labels to help parents and researchers better understand how much children are consuming, and the possib...

A new antibody test appears to have honed in on the most likely cause of a mysterious polio-like disease that regularly sweeps through the United States.

The new test detected antibodies for two types of enteroviruses in the spinal fluid of dozens of patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a disease that causes potentially permanent and sometimes life-threatening paralys...

Smoking around kids may harm their vision as their eyes are still developing, a new study suggests.

Secondhand smoke has long been linked to increased risks for cancer and stroke in adults, and asthma, lung infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in children, according to the American Cancer Society. Now, added to these is the risk of changes in the eye that may cause visio...

When children with genetically high cholesterol are prescribed statins, it can drastically cut their risk of heart disease and death before the age of 40, a new study finds.

At issue is a condition called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an inherited genetic disorder that causes levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol to soar. It begins at birth, and people with FH have a high risk of deve...

New research on concussions reports mixed news for kids playing high school sports.

The good news? Concussions are down during football practices. And the number of recurrent concussions is down in all sports.

The bad news? Concussions are on the rise during high school football games, and football continues to have the highest concussion rates in high school sports.

...

Early treatment with an immune-boosting therapy might improve the outlook of young children with an advanced form of cancer, a new small study suggests.

The trial involved 43 children with high-risk neuroblastoma, a cancer that starts in immature nerve cells. Researchers found that a new treatment approach -- involving an experimental antibody given right off the bat -- started to qui...

Children whose moms had high levels of lead in their blood during pregnancy are more likely than others to carry excess weight by age 8, new research reveals.

The conclusion stems from a look at blood tests of more than 1,440 mothers within three days after delivery. Their lead levels were then compared to their offspring's weight fluctuations during childhood.

The study cou...

There is still no clear cause for a mysterious paralytic condition that has been striking U.S. children over the past five years, government health officials report.

Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspect that a virus of some kind is the culprit. But the specific germ causing the outbreaks remains unknown, according to the report published online Oc...

New research suggests that anxiety and depression can make it hard for some kids to manage their asthma.

Young patients with all three conditions ended up in the emergency room nearly twice as often as kids who only struggle with asthma, the study found.

"Asthma self-management is complex, requiring recognition of symptoms, adherence to medication and avoidance of triggers,...

When a child gets sick, doctors are increasingly relying on what's known as "off-label" use of medications, a new study says.

Off-label use of a drug means that it hasn't been specifically studied and approved for the condition, age group or weight of the person getting the prescription.

For example, kids with asthma may be prescribed antihistamines (approved for allergies,...

Critically ill kids are far more likely to survive if they're treated at hospital emergency rooms that are well-equipped to care for children, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 20,400 critically ill youngsters seen in ERs at 426 hospitals in Florida, Iowa, Massachusetts, Nebraska and New York state.

The risk of death was three times lower for those tr...

There's good and bad news in a new report on tuberculosis rates among American children and teens: Overall, the number of cases have fallen by nearly half, but they still remain much higher among minorities than whites.

Tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial lung disease, is potentially fatal, but it is preventable and curable in children and teens.

"These wide-ranging and pervasive...

Forty percent of U.S. parents say they would likely find a new doctor if their child's primary care provider sees families who refuse childhood vaccines, a nationwide poll finds.

And three in 10 say their child's primary care provider should not treat youngsters whose parents refuse all vaccines.

Those are key findings of the latest C.S. Mott Chil...

As they get older, U.S. children born with HIV are less likely to take the medicine they need to fight the AIDS-causing virus, a new study finds.

About 12,000 children, teens and young adults in the United States have had HIV since birth. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is key to managing the infection and reducing the risk of transmission.

In this study, researchers followed 3...

Many U.S. doctors are much less likely to recommend cough and cold medicines for young children ever since experts advised against it in 2008, new research shows.

That's the good news. The bad news?

Physicians are still more likely to recommend antihistamines for children under age 12 with colds, despite the fact that they provide little known benefit, the researchers from R...

Researchers are closing in on the toll of childhood cancer, finding it stole 11.5 million years of healthy life lost worldwide in 2017.

Premature death took 97% of that toll, and impaired quality of life about 3%, the study found.

"Estimating the years of healthy life children have lost due to cancer allows policy makers to compare the lifelong implications of childh...

You're on an overseas flight with your young child, who starts complaining of fever and chills. You ask the flight attendant for help, maybe some pain relievers. Will the plane's first aid kit have what your child needs?

Not likely, new research finds. While children account for 16% of medical emergencies on airplanes, few first aid kits have child-specific remedies for such emerg...

Good family relationships may help buffer asthma's effects in children facing difficult neighborhood conditions, a new study says.

It's known that neighborhood environmental factors such as pollution and allergens can affect the wheezing and breathing children with asthma. But less has been known about the impact of social conditions such as family relationships.

In this stu...

The "season" for a polio-like illness that mainly strikes children is about to begin, so public health officials sent out an early warning to doctors on Tuesday.

The largest recorded outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) occurred last year, with the illness debilitating 233 people in 41 states across the nation, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

...

Almost 2 million children could lose out on vital public health care and food assistance due to a proposed Trump administration rule change related to U.S. immigration, a new study argues.

As many as 1.9 million children with specific medical problems are projected to drop out of federal health and nutrition benefit programs if the administration follows through on a plan to broaden t...

Infants and young children with vitamin D deficiency may have a heightened risk for elevated blood pressure later in childhood and in their teens, a new study finds.

Researchers followed 775 children in Boston from birth to age 18. Most were from low-income families in urban neighborhoods.

Compared to children born with normal vitamin D levels, those born with low levels --...

He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of support we can provide kids who may feel is...

Many kids with tics can suppress them, and learning how they do it could lead to ways to help prevent major tic disorders such as Tourette syndrome, researchers say.

At least 20% of elementary school-age children develop tics, such as excessive blinking, throat clearing or sniffing, but they don't become a long-term problem.

It was believed that most tics go away on thei...

Children with birth defects may be at increased risk for childhood cancer, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 10 million children born in Texas, Arkansas, Michigan and North Carolina between 1992 and 2013.

Compared to children without a birth defect, those with genetic defects were almost 12 times more likely to develop cancer by age 18. Those whose ...

Overweight preschoolers have twice the odds of developing high blood pressure by age 6, putting them at risk of heart attack and stroke later in life.

And those odds begin building as early as age 4, a new study reports.

"The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health problem," said study author Dr. Inaki Galan, ...

Children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at an early age have slowed growth in brain areas linked to mild cognitive deficits, new research suggests.

The study compared MRIs of the brain in kids with type 1 diabetes to age-matched children without the condition. Researchers also saw that areas of slower brain growth were associated with higher average blood sugar levels.

"We ...

Concussions aren't only a concern for high school and college athletes -- they're also a leading injury risk for kids as young as age 5 who play sports.

That's the upshot of a new study of injury risk among 1,500 elementary school athletes in one Florida county. For the study, University of South Florida researchers focused on 5- to 11-year-olds who play recreational football, soccer...