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Health News Results - 235

Last summer was a record-breaker for heat emergencies, so the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday launched a new online heat forecaster to help folks better prepare as summer nears.

The

Weather disasters driven by climate change are stressing out U.S. teenagers, a new study warns.

Teens with the most firsthand experience of events like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, droughts and wildfires were more likely to show signs of mental distress than peers who hadn't been confronted with the effects of climate change, researchers report.

“We know that climate change has ...

A white winter landscape might look magical, but the cold and snow and ice can make even the simplest of tasks potentially dangerous.

“It's slip and fall season,” said Dr. Letitia Bradford, an orthopedic surgeon who practices in rural communities in New Mexico and California. “We see a lot of ankle and wrist fractures dur...

Controlled forest burns can prevent the sort of high-intensity wildfires that have plagued the Western U.S. and Canada as a result of climate change, a new study argues.

A low-intensity fire in the mixed conifer forests of California provides an estimated 60% reduction in the risk of a catastrophic wildfire, and that effect lasts at least six years, researchers report in the journal <...

As sweltering summer days become more common, the number of Americans who die of heat-related heart problems or strokes could soar over the next few decades, a new study projects.

The study -- published Oct. 30 in the journal Circulation -- estimates that by mid-century the United States will see thos...

Climate change is bringing diseases once considered tropical afflictions to the United States, and new research warns that a parasite spread by sand flies may be the latest to join this growing list.

The Leishmania parasite causes several forms of the disease leishmaniasis, including cutaneous leishmaniasis, which causes skin sores. Cutaneous leishmaniasis infects up to 1 million...

Yellow fever may be resurfacing in the United States, thanks to climate change.

The mosquito-borne viral illness decimated southern U.S. cities from 1820 to 1905, and now a new report says it could return to those areas.

One of the potential reasons for a yellow fever resurgence? Global warming, because mosquitoes love warm, wet weather.

Exactly where yellow fever...

While the hot, dry summer may have offered a break to people with some environmental allergies, that reprieve could be over.

Ragweed and mold are in the air this fall.

“This summer was good news for people who are sensitive to mold and pollen as there were little of those allergens in the air, but now that we're seeing more rain coming in after this drought, we're experiencing a b...

The signs of climate change are everywhere, from raging wildfires to flash flooding to soaring temperatures.

Now, a new study warns that things could get worse, with scientists reporting that even small increases in global temperatures will make some parts of the Earth too hot for humans to endure.

“As long as we continue to put greenhouse gases emissions into the atmosphere, we'...

People who experience flooding aren't just at risk during these severe weather events -- they also have a significantly higher risk of dying in the weeks that follow.

A new study by Australian scientists looked at a crucial window between three and six weeks after a flood.

The added ris...

Sweltering temperatures appear to fuel drug-related hospital visits, a problem that could be worsening with climate change, a new study suggests.

“We saw that during periods of higher temperatures, there was a corresponding increase in hospital visits related to alcohol and substance use, which also brings attention to some less obvious potential consequences of climate change,” said ...

Phoenix, already the hottest major city in the nation, experienced its most scorching summer on record this year, new data shows. And that will likely prompt the highest number of heat-associated deaths ever reported in the city in one year.

At this point, Maricopa County public health officials have confirmed 289 heat-associated deaths, the Associated Press reported. As of Sept....

As this summer has shown, the massive smoke plumes generated by wildfires can dirty the air of regions many miles away. Now a new study is raising the question of whether that pollution is contributing to suicides in rural America.

Researchers found a correlation between air pollution from "drifting" wildfire smoke and a rise in U.S. counties' suicide rates. The connection was not seen ev...

Hot weather can pose serious health risks for older adults.

Existing medical conditions, problems moving around and medications raise the risk of heatstroke, according to an expert at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Being prepared can help prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke.

“As we age, we become less efficient at noticing and adjusting to the heat,” geriatr...

Global warming has been linked to higher rates of asthma, heart disease and other health concerns. Now, new research suggests that rising temperatures across the planet may place pregnant women at greater risk for severe pregnancy-related illnesses, especially in their third trimester.

And this is likely to get worse in the near future, said study author

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 8, 2023
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  • Winter months can be a challenge for those trying to keep their high blood pressure in check, new research suggests.

    In an analysis of more than 60,000 American adults being treated for high blood pressure at six health care centers in the Southeast and Midwest United States, scientists found that systolic blood pressure -- the top number -- rose slightly in winter months, by up to 1.7 mm...

    Heat domes and extreme heat waves have been battering the United States for years now, and a new study shows that increasing temperatures are doing real harm to humans.

    A significant increase in heat-related illnesses like heat stroke and heat exhaustion has occurred during the past two decades among patients treated at U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) health facilities, VA researc...

    As waters warm across the United States and hurricanes and flooding season begins, the odds of being infected by flesh-eating bacteria are also rising, U.S. health officials warn.

    According to a Sept. 1 health alert from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a dozen types of the bacteria called <...

    Hurricane Idalia is expected to make landfall in the United States Wednesday.

    Idalia was forecast to be a powerful Category 3 storm by the time it reaches Florida's Big Bend, an area prone to storm surge that stretches from Tampa to just south of Tallahassee. It's also expected to hit eastern parts of Georgia and the Carolinas before heading out to sea late Thursday or early Friday.

    Death rates skyrocket during extreme weather events among the most vulnerable Americans, especially those from minority groups.

    A study looking at hurricanes over more than three decades showed that their impacts varied and were driven by differences in social, economic and demographic factors such as race.

    “Really, we wanted to understand what the comparative impact was over tim...

    While the record-breaking heat the United States is experiencing this summer can stress people to their limits, it can be particularly hard to navigate for those with mental health issues.

    "All mental illnesses increase with heat because it results in more fatigue, irritability and anxiety, and it can exacerbate depressive episodes," said

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2023
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  • Tornado damage to a Pfizer drug-making plant in North Carolina is unlikely to trigger drug shortages across the country, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

    "We do not expect there to be any immediate significant impacts on supply, given the products are currently at hospitals and in the distribution system," FDA Commissioner

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 24, 2023
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  • It's hot out there. If you're working out outdoors this summer, take precautions.

    “If you plan to exercise in the heat, know your fitness level, take frequent breaks, wear proper clothing, wear sunscreen, avoid hottest times of the day and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate,” said Melanie...

    The color of the oceans has changed over the past two decades, which has scientists concerned about the impact of climate change.

    “I've been running simulations that have been telling me for years that these changes in ocean color are going to happen,” said study co-author Stephanie Dutkiewicz, senior research scientist in M...

    As extreme heat continues to blanket numerous parts of the United States, Americans with dementia may be particularly challenged.

    “Triple-digit temperatures and heat indexes are especially dangerous for someone with a dementia-related illness such as Alzheimer's disease, because the effects of dementia can impair their ability to notice if they are developing heat stroke or dehydra...

    Record-breaking heat waves are pummeling the United States and the world, causing many to wonder how much of this a body can take and still survive.

    The limit is somewhere between 104 and 122 degrees Fahrenheit if you're sitting perfectly still, according to a small study conducted in the United Kingdom.

    Researchers say they are starting to hone in on the high temperatures that...

    Older American adults who live in warmer regions are more likely to have serious vision impairment than those who live in cooler places, new research finds.

    Living with average temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit or above -- think South Florida, for example -- created much higher odds of blindness or trouble seeing even with glasses, according to a new study of 1.7 million people.
    ...

    For the second time this month, massive plumes of smoke from hundreds of out-of-control Canadian wildfires are polluting much of America's air.

    Among the major U.S. cities now experiencing poor air quality are St. Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati and Chicago, while entire states have also issued air quality alerts, according to the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 29, 2023
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  • Wild and feral cats appear to release more toxoplasmosis parasites in places densely populated with people, new research suggests.

    These cats also "shed" more when the temperature is warmer, a significant finding given climate change, according to the report published online June 21 in PLOS ONE.

    Policymakers could help protect humans from this illness by better managing th...

    Kidney stones are something most folks want to avoid at all costs, but few may know that the chances of developing this excruciating condition rise during the hot months of summer.

    Luckily, it is possible to take steps to prevent stones from forming, primarily by increasing water intake and making small changes to your diet.

    An expert from the Department of Urology at UT Southwester...

    Heat illness can be deadly, so it's essential to recognize the warning signs and know what to do as the summer season gets into gear.

    “Heat illness tends to happen when the body is unable to regulate its temperature due to overexertion or extended periods of time in high temperatures,” said Dr. Maria Carmenz...

    Just like their humans, dogs get cranky when temperatures and air pollution levels surge.

    Heat and air pollution have previously been linked to human aggression. Now, researchers say it also appears that there are more dog bites on hot, polluted days.

    More research is needed to confirm these findings, according to study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 16, 2023
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  • Extreme heat can be dangerous, but you can stay cool and safe this summer if you take the right precautions.

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) offers some tips for doing so.

    “No matter your age, it is critical to be able to recognize the signs of heat-related illness,” said

    Ticks are extremely resilient even when temperatures vary wildly, according to scientists who are working to better understand the spread of Lyme disease.

    In their new study, black-legged ticks, notorious for carrying pathogens, were very good at surviving both extreme cold and high heat, the scientists found. This was true both for nymph and adult ticks. Only larval ticks were more affec...

    The Atlantic hurricane season in the United States starts June 1, and some dangers might not be immediately obvious: carbon monoxide poisoning, fires and electric shock.

    “Hurricanes and major storms in the U.S. have increased in frequency and severity in recent years. This hurricane season may bring widespread destruction that could impact millions of Americans,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 22, 2023
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  • Men, want to burn fat? Chill out.

    New research shows that exposure to cold in the morning may help you burn more fat than at other times of day.

    Exposure to cold activates brown fat, producing heat to help the body maintain its temperature and burn calories, especially ...

    Children are uniquely vulnerable to the effects of climate change, a new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows.

    Climate change can affect learning, physical health and housing security, which can last throughout the child's life, according to the report.

    “Understanding health risks to children is critical for developing effective and equitable strategie...

    Tornadoes bring with them many dangers, but perhaps not so evident are the risks from colorless and odorless carbon monoxide (CO) from generators used to temporarily restore power.

    With parts of the United States expecting another round of severe weather, the Consumer Product Safety Commission offers tips to avoid CO poisoning or fires in the aftermath of a major storm or tornado.

    C...

    Hurricanes not only disrupt the communities they affect, they also pose an increased risk of death for people with dementia.

    This heightened risk could owe to disruption in their normal routines, changes in their living environment or even changes in access to caregiving or medications, a University of Michigan researcher said.

    "The important message is that older adults with dement...

    The changes in temperature and daylight brought by winter may make a person feel like hibernating.

    It turns out that humans do get longer REM sleep in wintertime and less deep sleep in autumn, even in an urban setting, German researchers reported Feb 17 in Frontiers in Neuroscience....

    Winter's icy beauty can also be dangerous.

    An orthopedic expert offers some tips for avoiding serious injuries on slippery ground or hazards hidden by snow.

    "When people have injuries during the winter, it commonly involves tripping over an object or slipping on ice," said

    Winter weather can add a layer of danger to the wandering behavior common in people with dementia.

    The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) offers some suggestions to help prevent wandering and prepare folks to react quickly if it occurs.

    “During the winter, it's especially important for families living in areas affected by cold weather, snow and ice,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 27, 2023
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  • If it seems as though everyone you know struggles with some sort of allergy, new research suggests you are not mistaken.

    As many as 1 in 3 adults and 1 in 4 kids suffers from a seasonal allergy, a food allergy or eczema, the latest government data shows.

    Caused by a reaction to plant pollen, seasonal allergies were most common type of allergy in both kids and adults. Symptoms includ...

    Send yourself some love this Valentine's Day by setting a reminder to start taking your spring allergy medications.

    It's important to begin allergy meds two weeks before symptoms are expected to appear when possible, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

    "It's not the most romantic idea in the world, but it is an effective way to remember when ...

    When the deadly Camp Fire swept through Northern California in 2018, it may have damaged more than the landscape.

    University of California, San Diego researchers studying survivors' mental functioning in the wake of the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state's history have uncovered evidence of “climate trauma.”

    The November 2018 fire burned 239 square miles, destr...

    Winter is no friend to the body's delicate skin, but an expert offers three key tips: moisturize, moisturize, moisturize.

    “It's pretty intuitive, but it bears repeating,” said dermatologist Dr. David Pearson, an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School, in Minneapolis. “The environment treat...

    Wearing proper gear, watching out for snow and ice hazards, and “walking like a penguin” are just some of the tips that can help prevent winter accidents, one medical expert says.

    “A variety of injuries can occur during the winter,” cautioned Dr. Mahmood Gharib, a physiatrist at the University of Minnesota Medica...

    Adding climate-impact labeling to fast-food menus can have a big effect on whether or not consumers go “green" when eating out, new research suggests.

    The finding is based on an online survey that asked consumers to order virtual meals after randomly looking over menus that either had some...

    Getting around in winter works best if you're taking good care of the feet that take you places.

    Orthopedic specialists at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City say they often see an uptick in avoidable injuries and foot problems during the winter.

    They offered some tips for winterizing your feet.

    First, make sure your winter shoes and boots still fit.

    ...

    Cold, dry winter air and a trio of spreading viruses could cause children's asthma to flare up this winter season.

    But experts at one children's hospital offer some tips to help parents keep their kids' worrisome respiratory symptoms in check.

    While asthma is a lung condition that can make it harder to breathe, some things can make symptoms worse, such as illness, cold air and smok...