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Health News Results - 532

The lives of college students have been turned upside down due to the coronavirus pandemic, so an expert offers some advice to help them cope with the situation.

Along with having to switch from in-person classes to online sessions, students have lost many other parts of their daily routine, so it's important to maintain a "foundation of coping skills" such as good sleep habits, healt...

Parenting a teenager can be an emotional minefield in the best of times, but the social distancing of the coronavirus pandemic could really strain young people's mental health.

Teens and young adults who are confined to home during the coronavirus pandemic face numerous disappointments, including not being able to hang out with friends, missing out on new life experiences and trying t...

Women who develop mental health problems after delivering their first child are much less likely to have more, a Danish study finds.

But this is not the case among women whose first child died.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 414,000 women in Denmark who had a first live birth between 1997 and 2015. About 1% developed problems such as depression, an...

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

Having a furry, fluffy or feathered friend can have a profound effect on seniors' mental health, possibly even helping prevent some suicides, new research suggests.

In a group of 35 older people who were pet owners, more than one-third said they were "actively suicidal" or "significantly traumatized," but their pets gave them a reason to live.

One of these men had dogs and...

The new coronavirus is not just a physical health threat. The stress, anxiety, fear and isolation that go along with it also take a toll on your mental well-being.

"One of the basic tenets of how to manage your mental health in a crisis like this is to ensure that you're taking care of your own basic needs -- taking breaks, having rest and sleep, getting adequate nutrition, exercisin...

The social distancing and isolation of the coronavirus pandemic may put people struggling with addiction at risk for relapse, an expert says.

Feeling stressed, isolated and scared may drive them back to substance abuse, said Dr. Lawrence Brown Jr., CEO of the nonprofit START Treatment & Recovery Centers, New York's largest independent drug treatment agency.

"Whatever str...

Technology can help you maintain social connections if you're staying home during the coronavirus pandemic, an expert says.

"When using technology to stay connected, prioritize keeping deeper, meaningful connections with people," said Stephen Benning, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Benning suggests using Skype or other video mes...

Kids who don't get enough sleep may be at risk for ADHD, anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, researchers report.

"If we make sure our children get enough sleep, it can help protect them from mental health problems," said researcher Bror Ranum, a doctoral candidate at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.

The study followed nearl...

Until the discovery of Viagra, men with erectile dysfunction were largely left with the impression that their sexual problems were all in their head.

That might still be somewhat true, even in this age of little blue pills, a new paper argues.

A good number of men receiving a placebo in clinical trials for erectile dysfunction drugs experienced an improvement in their functi...

As the days heat up, people tend to report more emotional distress, a new study finds, adding to concerns that global warming could take a growing mental health toll.

The study of more than 3 million Americans found that the longer people had to sweat out 80-degree days, the bigger the mental health drain. They were more likely to report problems with depression, stress and emotional ...

Rates of anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts are all on the rise among U.S. teens, a new study finds.

"We aren't sure why this is occurring, but it is clear from this evidence and other epidemiological studies that anxiety, depression and other internalizing problems are becoming more prevalent among adolescents relative to other types of mental health problems," study author Dr...

Social distancing has become the new normal, with one-third of Americans now under stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus pandemic, but experts say that level of isolation can be hard on your health.

"We don't know for sure what the long-term health outcomes of widespread forced social isolation will be, but given what we know about the effects of social isolation and stress on ph...

Consumers are happier when they spend money on experiences, instead of more stuff, a pair of new studies finds.

"It would be unfair to compare a shirt to a trip, but when we account for price, we still see this result where experiences are associated with more happiness," said lead author Amit Kumar, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Texas at Austin.

...

U.S. immigration policies may put Hispanic teens' mental and physical health at risk, researchers say.

Of 547 U.S.-born Hispanic kids surveyed in Atlanta, one-quarter had a parent, aunt, uncle or other family member who was detained or deported in 2017 or 2018. Participants were questioned twice, six months apart.

Compared to other middle school- and high school-aged youth, ...

Pandemic. Politics. An upending of life at a level that few Americans have ever experienced. And all of it amplified by social media.

The ever-shifting news has some people constantly checking their phones for updates – and others saying they're ready to walk away from their feeds entirely.

"It's really the perfect recipe for anxiety and panic," said licensed clinical psyc...

As nonstop news about the global pandemic of coronavirus spreads worry, there's a chance to grab a respite. By United Nations proclamation, Friday is International Day of Happiness, with events around the world aimed at spreading good cheer.

It may be a tough sell given the constant uncertainty in the United States and globally about coronavirus. Yet, studies show a mind-body connection...

Being recognized for your efforts at work could reduce your risk of burnout, new research suggests.

Emotional exhaustion, decreased productivity and depersonalization (loss of identity) are characteristics of burnout, a widespread problem that takes a significant toll on workers and employers, the researchers said.

For the study, they asked 328 employees to complete a questi...

Teens who live around lots of obese or overweight kids come to see their body types as ideal, a new study suggests.

As a result, these teens tend to be obese or overweight themselves, researchers say.

"Higher obesity rates may normalize unhealthy weight in teens and make obesity prevention harder," said lead researcher Ashlesha Datar. She's a senior economist at the Center...

Smoking just one joint of marijuana is enough to trigger psychotic, depressive and anxiety symptoms in otherwise healthy people, British researchers report.

The review of data involved 331 people with no prior history of psychotic or other major psychiatric disorders. It found that there's enough THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) -- the main psychoactive ingredient in pot -- in one joint to ...

Even in the midst of rising rates of suicide and substance abuse, nearly 117 million Americans live in what is known as "health professional shortage areas."

Put another way, only 27% of mental health needs in those areas are being met, according to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). More than 6,300 additional providers would be needed to erase the gap.

...

Brain inflammation may be more of a factor in dementia than previously believed, a new British study suggests.

"We predicted the link between inflammation in the brain and the buildup of damaging proteins, but even we were surprised by how tightly these two problems mapped on to each other," said co-author Thomas Cope of the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Ca...

Can a self-help strategy built on daily expressions of gratitude keep depression and anxiety at bay? Don't count on it, researchers say.

That's the takeaway from a review of 27 studies involving nearly 3,700 participants. Each study focused on the impact of so-called "gratitude interventions" -- such as "Three Good Things," in which people reflect on three things that went well that d...

Can a self-help strategy built on daily expressions of gratitude keep depression and anxiety at bay? Don't count on it, researchers say.

That's the takeaway from a review of 27 studies involving nearly 3,700 participants. Each study focused on the impact of so-called "gratitude interventions" -- such as "Three Good Things," in which people reflect on three things that went well that d...

Staying calm during the coronavirus pandemic isn't easy, but a few simple steps will help you stay informed yet relaxed.

Keep up-to-date with reliable sources.

"Given the onslaught of media coverage and information, it's important to make sure you are getting updates from reputable sources," said Nathaniel Van Kirk, coordinator of inpatient group therapy at McLean Ho...

If you self-quarantine or practice social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus, you might feel lonely, anxious or depressed.

But there are ways to cope, Northwestern University experts say.

"First, acknowledge that this is a stressful time and likely to bring up lots of emotions like fear and anxiety," said Judith Moskowitz, a professor of medical social sciences ...

Are you scared and confused over the threat of coronavirus? You're not alone: Every day, every hour, new media reports can have you worrying about worst-case scenarios.

Experts say panic is a natural -- if unhelpful -- response to major crises like COVID-19. But there are ways to stay both informed and calm.

It's not always easy, acknowledged psychologist Roxane Sil...

Suicidal thoughts have haunted nearly one of every 10 pre-teens in the United States, a new study reveals.

About 8.4% of children aged 9 or 10 said they'd temporarily or regularly harbored thoughts of suicide, researchers report.

Importantly, only around 1% of children that age reported a suicide attempt or planning their suicide.

But suicidal thoughts at t...

Could clues to future health emergencies be found in Facebook posts?

Maybe so, according to a new study that discovered there are changes in users' posts before they seek emergency care.

For the study, researchers analyzed the Facebook posts and medical records of more than 2,900 patients at a U.S. urban hospital, including 419 who'd had a recent emergency department visit f...

Access to nature is growing harder for urban folks to find, with relatively wild places few and far between.

Now, researchers with the University of Washington (UW), in Seattle, have found that not all forms of nature equally benefit human well-being. Wildness is especially important for both physical and mental health, the new study finds.

"It was clear from our results tha...

Having a large social network of other people with the same sexual identity benefits the health of LGBT people, a new study finds.

Previous studies have found that discrimination and related stress can be harmful to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, so researchers decided to look at social factors that may reduce that harm.

The investigators...

For people who want to stop drinking, the world's oldest alcohol support group is still the best way, a new review concludes.

In an analysis of 27 studies, researchers found that Alcoholics Anonymous was typically more effective than behavioral therapies when it came to helping people remain abstinent. AA also appeared as good as those therapies in reducing excessive drinking, and the...

Lesbian, gay and bisexual teens are far more likely than their straight peers to suffer physical and/or sexual violence, new research warns.

The warning stems from surveys of nearly 29,000 teens, aged 14 to 18, conducted in 2015 and 2017 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Overall, LGBQ teens (lesbian, gay, bisexual and teens who are questioning their se...

Your morning cup of coffee may help your focus and problem-solving skills, but it won't kick-start your creativity, a new study says.

"In Western cultures, caffeine is stereotypically associated with creative occupations and lifestyles, from writers and their coffee to programmers and their energy drinks, and there's more than a kernel of truth to these stereotypes," said study first ...

Asthma and allergy drug montelukast -- sold as a generic and under the brand name Singulair -- will get a "boxed warning" over potential ties to neuropsychiatric effects, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Wednesday.

The drug has long carried a warning that it has been linked with an increased risk of "agitation, depression, sleeping problems, and suicidal thoughts and...

When it comes to committing first crimes, the thrill of it all is what matters most, new research suggests.

The finding could point to ways to prevent people from becoming habitual offenders, researchers say.

"It's important to understand under what circumstances young people make that initial decision to commit a crime, so we can think about intervention," said study leader...

Could stricter safety rules for rifles and shotguns help prevent suicide?

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore analyzed nearly 4,000 firearm suicides and found that long guns, not handguns, are more often the method of choice for youths and people in rural areas.

Their analysis of Maryland data for 2003 to 2018 revealed that about 45% of children and teens ...

You need to work on your relationship with your significant other all year round, not just on Valentine's Day, a relationship expert advises.

There are five key things you can do to keep your relationship healthy, according to Frank Provenzano, an instructor in psychology and a clinical psychologist at Furman University, in Greenville, S.C.

Share one new thing with your p...

When someone close to you dies, grief can literally break your heart, but two common medicines may help prevent a heart attack.

"While almost everyone loses someone they love during their lifetime and grief is a natural reaction, this stressful time can be associated with an increased risk of heart attack," said Dr. Geoffrey Tofler, a professor of preventive cardiology at the Univers...

Optimism might be powerful medicine when recovering from a stroke, a new study suggests.

Stroke survivors who had positive outlooks showed lower levels of inflammation, reduced stroke severity and fewer physical impairments after three months compared to more pessimistic stroke survivors, the researchers found.

"Our results suggest that optimistic people have a better diseas...

A deadly virus that's surging through a foreign country makes its way into the United States, carried into this country by an unwitting traveler.

In response, Americans panic, convinced the pathogen will soon sweep through the nation -- even though only a handful of people in the United States have fallen ill.

That may sound like the current state of affairs with the new cor...

From hormonal changes to new schedules and altered expectations, children face a variety of challenges when they enter middle school. But students and their parents aren't the only ones stressing out.

Researchers from the University of Missouri found that 94% of middle school teachers experience high stress levels. Reducing this burden could improve student success, researchers sa...

As Valentine's Day approaches, parents are reminded to shower their children with love and attention throughout the year.

"Building strong bonds and a positive relationship with your child has a nurturing effect on their physical, emotional, and social development," said Dr. Jennifer Shu, medical editor of the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) parenting website, HealthyChildren.or...

Women who receive general anesthesia during a cesarean section delivery are at higher risk of severe postpartum depression that requires hospitalization, as well as self-inflicted harm and suicidal thoughts, a new study finds.

Researchers from Columbia University analyzed more than 428,000 discharge records of women who delivered by C-section in New York state hospitals between 2006 a...

Smartphones, and being on Facebook, Snapchat, TikTok and the like may be taking a big toll on teens' mental health, a new survey of collected data on the subject shows.

Canadian researchers pored over dozens of studies and said the negative effects of social media on teens' well-being is on the rise.

"Physicians, teachers and families need to work together with youth to decr...

Zoos that have large, well-known types of animals attract more visitors, which means more money for conservation, a new study finds.

Zoos and aquariums are among the leading sources of conservation funding and refuges for species with dwindling numbers in the wild.

"Our findings show that charismatic animals in the care of accredited zoos, and the visitors that come to see t...

Following weight-loss surgery, teens may see some aspects of their health improve, but overall mental health isn't likely to budge, a new study suggests.

In the five years after gastric bypass surgery, teens experienced small gains in self-esteem and some improvement in binge-eating, but no sizable boost in overall mood, researchers found.

"The transition from adolescence ...

Nurses are at elevated risk for suicide, but the issue gets little attention, researchers report.

Their study of 2005-2016 U.S. government data found the suicide rate among female nurses was significantly higher (10 per 100,000) than that of the general female population (7 per 100,000). The rate among male nurses (33 per 100,000) was also higher than in the general male population (2...

Most women won't be surprised by this finding: Less than one-third of women worldwide are satisfied with the size of their breasts.

But a new study suggests that what many women may not realize is their dissatisfaction could have implications for their health.

Surveys of more than 18,500 women in 40 countries, average age 34, found that 48% wanted larger breasts, 23%...

Traits relating to traditional masculinity -- such as self-reliance and stoicism -- are associated with more severe and difficult-to-treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military veterans, researchers say.

"Overall, we found that strict adherence to masculine norms was associated with more severe PTSD symptoms in veterans, but more detailed analysis suggests that the associa...

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