Duren Apothecary Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Cancer: Misc.".

Health News Results - 500

As COVID-19 continues to impact nearly all aspects of American health care, researchers warn that the United States has seen a troubling drop in cancer diagnoses since the pandemic began.

The drop is not being attributed to a downturn in cancer incidence, but rather a COVID-driven reluctance to get screened.

"Our research found that during the COVID-19 pandemic, between Marc...

Scientists for the first time have identified an aggressive bone cancer in a dinosaur that lived nearly 77 million years ago.

The cancerous lower leg bone (fibula) is from a horned dinosaur called a Centrosaurus apertus. At first, researchers thought the bone had been broken and was healing when the animal died, but state-of-the-art technology showed it had a cancer known as...

Cities around the world are increasingly turning to streetlights emitting so-called "blue light," and it's also common in smartphones, laptops and tablets. Now, a study hints that excess exposure to blue-spectrum light might raise a person's odds for colon cancer.

As a team of Spanish researchers noted, prior studies have suggested that blue light emitted by most white LEDs (light-emi...

There's a low level of awareness among American women about a form of lymphoma that can occur around breast implants, a new study finds.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is an immune system cancer. It's estimated to occur in between 1 in 3,000 and 1 in 12,000 women with textured breast implants. Smooth-surfaced implants are associated with a lower ra...

An updated guideline from the American Cancer Society calls for more simplified cervical cancer screening, administered less often.

The new guideline calls for an initial cervix screening at age 25, followed by the human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years, continuing through age 65, the guideline says.

"These streamlined recommendations can improve compliance and re...

Despite rampant fears that cancer patients are at higher risk of having severe cases of COVID-19, a new study suggests gynecologic cancers do not boost the chances of hospitalization or death.

"Our study should be reassuring for women with gynecologic cancers who are worried that having cancer increases their risk of becoming seriously ill if they go to the hospital because of COVID-1...

COVID-19 is no joke for tens of thousands of ill Americans, but a new report shows just how dangerous it can be for those already fighting cancer.

The study was based on an analysis of the health records of 212,000 people living with cancer. It found that a COVID-19 diagnosis raised a patient's odds of death 16-fold, compared to cancer patients without the coronavirus.

Cance...

Want to avoid cancer? Consider brushing and flossing more often.

Why? Folks with bad gums might be at higher risk of developing certain types of cancer, new research suggests.

A history of gum disease appears to increase the risk of stomach cancer by 52% and throat cancer by 43%, according to data from two major long-term health studies.

People who'd lost t...

Immunotherapy for cancer patients with COVID-19 appears safe, a preliminary study suggests.

The treatments activate a person's immune system against cancer.

Researchers have been wary, because many COVID-19 complications result from an overactive immune response that leads to increased production of proteins called cytokines that can cause issues such as respiratory failur...

Want to boost colon cancer screening rates? Mail testing kits to patients' homes, a new study says.

Colon cancer is easily diagnosed by routine screening, such as colonoscopies and at-home stool testing.

But despite recommendations that adults get screened from ages 50 to 75, more than 33% of Americans are not up to date with screening.

Ways to increase screen...

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced Friday that she is undergoing chemotherapy to help fight a recurrence of pancreatic cancer, CNN reported.

The cancer has arisen once more, this time in her liver, according to a report from the court. Cutting-edge immunotherapy had been tried to shrink the tumor, but it wasn't effective. Standard chemotherapy does appear ...

FRIDAY, July 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Fans of "Jeopardy" host Alex Trebek got a health update for the first time in months on Thursday when he told followers that his treatments for pancreatic cancer are "paying off."

"I'm doing well," the 79-year-old host said in a video recorded at his home. "I've been continuing my treatment and it is paying off, though it does fatigue me a gr...

Irene Johnson noticed a big, blue bus bearing the words "Breathe Easy" outside the Benton, Tenn., library during the 2019 Labor Day weekend.

Inside, a librarian told Johnson that the bus was a mobile CT unit that travels around screening smokers for lung cancer.

Former longtime smokers, both Johnson and her husband, Karl, fit the criteria for getting screened, so they decide...

Many cancer patients have faced delays to their health care during the coronavirus pandemic, but with what consequences?

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston analyzed 15 years of data to determine how long surgery for certain types of cancer can be delayed without harming patients' chances of survival. The study began in early spring, as the pandemic led many ...

Parents are increasingly interested in whether medical marijuana can help their children with problems like cancer-related pain and nausea -- but there's concern about interactions with their medications and a general lack of research.

That's one of the main takeaways from a new report in Pediatrics detailing one hospital's approach to medical marijuana.

Doctors at Ch...

U.S. government-funded clinical trials for new cancer treatments have more Black participants than those run by drug companies, but Blacks are still underrepresented in cancer studies, researchers say.

The SWOG Cancer Research Network team analyzed data from 358 clinical trials -- 85 drug industry trials and 273 SWOG trials. They included nearly 94,000 patients who were being treated ...

After spending much of 2016 healing following the deaths of both his partner of 25 years and his mother, Oswald Peterson -- a professional carnival dancer in New York City -- was convinced 2017 would be his year to start again.

But life had other plans. Peterson, now 53, woke up on New Year's Day 2017 feeling awful.

"I could barely get across the floor. I went to urgent ca...

Medicaid expansion under Obamacare may have decreased the number of poorer Americans diagnosed with advanced cancer, a new study suggests.

The study focused on Ohio, which was among the first states to expand its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014.

The researchers found that in the three years after expansion, low-income residents saw a 15% dro...

Getting the recommended amount of exercise could cut your risk of early death, a new study indicates.

U.S. government guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity a week. They also suggest adults do moderate or greater intensity muscle-strengthening exercise at least two days a week.

That effort...

Health insurance plans with high deductibles may be taking a financial toll on Black patients, according to a new study of cancer survivors.

The researchers said the findings point to yet another reason for racial health disparities in the United States: High deductibles may make it harder for Black patients, in particular, to afford medications or see a doctor.

"Just becaus...

Could a cancer drug spare hospital patients from the ravages of severe COVID-19?

Yale doctors think it can after giving the medication, known as tocilizumab, to severely ill patients back in March.

How does tocilizumab work? It has a long history of dampening the life-threatening immune system reactions cancer patients often experience while undergoing treatment. Since the s...

Statin drugs, used for decades to treat high cholesterol, may also reduce deaths for women with ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

"These drugs are appealing as they are widely used, inexpensive, and well-tolerated in most patients. The associated reduction in ovarian cancer mortality is promising," said lead researcher Dr. Kala Visvanathan, a professor of epidemiology and oncolog...

An experimental blood test may improve screening for the most common form of liver cancer, researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute say.

The test checks people for previous exposure to certain viruses that may interact with the immune system and increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to their new study.

"Together with existing screening test...

Heart disease is on the rise among cancer patients and survivors, but they're less likely than people without cancer to be prescribed medicines to protect their heart, a new study finds.

Heart disease has become a leading cause of long-term preventable death in cancer survivors, according to the study published June 16 as a research letter in the journal JACC: CardioOncology.<...

A little romance may go a long way toward helping breast cancer survivors thrive.

New research showed that a strong romantic relationship wasn't the cure-all, but it was linked to lower psychological stress and lower inflammation, which is a key to staying healthy.

"It's important for survivors, when they're going through this uncertain time, to feel comfortable with their ...

A cutting-edge "lab-on-a-chip" has shown promise in detecting early breast cancers and tumors that have developed in other parts of the body.

Roughly the size of a glass microscope slide, the EV-CLUE uses nanotechnology to pump a tiny amount of blood into eight miniscule channels equipped to detect different markers of cancer, explained co-researcher Liang Xu, a professor of molecular...

Black Americans with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, wait longer for surgery than white patients, a new study finds.

"We already knew that black patients with melanoma have a worse prognosis and that longer time to treatment is associated with worse survival, but we didn't fully understand the relationship between race and time to treatment after controlling for various o...

The latest cancer prevention guidelines may change your typical backyard barbecue: Gone are the hot dogs and booze. In are veggie kebobs and maybe a swim or some badminton.

The American Cancer Society's new cancer prevention recommendations suggest, among other things, adding more physical activity to your days. About 20 minutes a day is the minimum, but 40 minutes or more daily is ...

Screening for breast and ovarian cancer genes might be added to the list of medical tests that can be safely and effectively done from home, new research suggests.

The study looked at screening for BRCA1, BRCA2 and other gene mutations linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have as much as a 7 in 10 chance of getting breast canc...

MONDAY, June 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The drug Tagrisso could offer hope to patients battling a form of lung cancer that typically hits people with little or no history of smoking, a new trial finds.

Taken after surgery to remove the lung tumor, Tagrisso (osimertinib) greatly extended the average survival of people battling a non-metastatic form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCL...

Headed to the beach or park for a little fresh air? Don't forget your sun protection, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans, but many don't protect themselves from harmful UV rays.

Sixty percent of respondents to an AAD survey said they had had such a bad sunburn their ...

Women with cancerous cells in their milk ducts -- also known as DCIS -- are at a high risk for developing fatal breast cancer, British researchers report.

DCIS is short for ductal carcinoma in situ, an early form of breast cancer. With stepped-up breast screening, it has become an increasingly common diagnosis.

Though it's not immediately life-threatening, DCIS more than dou...

For men with advanced prostate cancer, a new hormone therapy pill works better than standard injections -- and carries a much lower risk of heart attack or stroke, a clinical trial has found.

The drug, called relugolix, is not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If it gets the green light, however, it would be "game-changing," said Dr. Neal Shore, lead researcher on...

As the evidence piles up that a malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment by President Donald Trump may instead harm patients, a new study shows the same might hold true for cancer patients with COVID-19.

Researchers found that cancer patients with COVID-19 who receive both hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin have a higher risk of death than those who aren...

A cancer diagnosis can deliver a double blow -- along with dealing with a serious health crisis, you also need to worry about how your treatment is going to affect your finances.

Nearly three out of four people with advanced colon cancer that spread to other parts of their bodies experienced major financial hardships within a year of starting treatment, a new study found.

...

The human body is teeming with bacteria, and a new study finds the same is true of many cancers -- raising questions about what role microbes might play in the diseases.

Researchers have already known that tumors in certain areas of the body -- like the gut -- harbor bacteria of their own. But the new research reveals that a range of cancers, including those of the breast, lungs, bone...

Having a child with cancer doesn't appear to affect parents' risk of splitting up or their plans to have more kids.

That's the conclusion of a Danish study that compared more than 12,400 parents of children diagnosed with cancer between 1982 and 2014 to nearly 70,000 parents whose kids were cancer-free.

Parents were followed until 10 years after a child's cancer diagnosis --...

Prostate cancer screening guidelines have been evolving for more than a decade, but new research suggests that recommendations against routine prostate cancer testing may have come at a steep price -- more men getting diagnosed with advanced prostate cancers.

The study found that rates of advanced prostate cancers rose by about 5% per year through 2016.

There was some ...

Children with cancer don't have a higher risk of being affected by COVID-19 or of having severe symptoms, a new study finds.

"We are encouraged by these latest findings that kids with cancer are not more endangered by COVID-19 and their symptoms are mild like in healthy children," said study leader Dr. Andrew Kung, chair of the pediatric cancer program MSK Kids at Memorial Sloan Kette...

The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay.

A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles.

"We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being de...

Cancer death rates have declined more in U.S. states that expanded Medicaid after the Affordable Care Act than in those that didn't, a new study finds.

"This is the first study to show the benefit of Medicaid expansion on cancer death rates on a national scale," said lead author Dr. Anna Lee, a radiation oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

...

A combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may slow the progress of metastatic bladder cancer and extend survival, a clinical trial suggests.

Current treatment for advanced bladder cancer is chemotherapy, but adding the immunotherapy drug atezolizumab (Tecentriq) appears to help more patients fight this disease. It strikes 81,000 Americans a year and kills 18,000.

"Th...

COVID-19 has at least temporarily shut down more than half of cancer research, according to an American Cancer Society (ACS) survey.

The survey, conducted in early April, was completed by close to 500 cancer researchers who have received ACS funding. It revealed that:

  • 54% were working from home.
  • 32% were working both at home and in their lab.
  • ...

Health insurance disruptions are never a good thing, but for people with cancer it can lead to poor care and lower odds of survival, a new study finds.

This could prove ominous for the many Americans who have lost health insurance due to coronavirus-related layoffs.

"Our findings were consistent across multiple cancer sites, with several studies finding a 'dose-response' r...

There's good news for women: Getting a mammogram regularly can cut their odds of advanced and sometimes fatal breast cancers, a new study says.

European researchers tracked data from nearly 550,000 women in Sweden who were eligible for mammography screening.

The team compared rates of advanced and breast cancers that were fatal within 10 years after diagnosis for women who g...

There's been a sharp decline in the number of U.S. children taking part in cancer clinical trials over the past few decades, but researchers say that might be good news.

Why? Having more effective treatments available now may be one reason for that decrease, they explained.

The researchers, from the University of Colorado Cancer Center, analyzed national data and found that ...

If warning labels on cigarette packs discourage smoking, could warning labels on alcohol products discourage drinking? Researchers in Canada decided to find out.

In the study, which began in 2017, the researchers applied about 300,000 colorful, highly visible warning labels to 98% of alcohol containers in the largest liquor store in the Yukon, which has Canada's highest rate of a...

Artificial intelligence may reduce the need for glioma brain cancer patients to have biopsies to determine the best treatment for their tumors, researchers report.

Currently, it's common to remove glioma samples from patients and analyze them to select appropriate therapy.

But scientists have been testing imaging techniques that might be used instead of biopsies to assess gl...

There's an association between blood infections caused by certain types of bacteria and an increased risk of colon cancer, a new study finds.

"At this stage we are not sure if the bacteria are directly causing cases of colorectal cancer, or if the blood infection with these bacteria is itself caused by the cancer. It's an example of the question 'is this the chicken or the egg?'" said...

If colon cancer runs in your family, screening at age 40 might help catch the disease at an early stage, or even prevent it, specialists say.

But a new investigation suggests that that advice is rarely heeded among those who go on to develop colon cancer before age 50.

"We need better public awareness of the importance of family history, and systems put in place to help make...

Show All Health News Results