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Public health officials have been warning that a COVID-19 vaccine will not be available to the public for 12 to 18 months, dampening hopes that there will be a quick end to the global pandemic nightmare.

But Chinese researchers cracked the virus' genetic code within weeks of its emergence late last year, and two vaccine candidates are already in early human trials -- one in China and ...

A drug originally developed to treat Ebola is getting a second chance in the spotlight, as research teams in the United States, Asia and Europe race to test it against the new coronavirus.

The drug, called remdesivir, has already been given to a limited number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19, on a "compassionate use" basis. That included the first U.S. patient diagnosed with th...

The first community-acquired case of COVID-19 in the United States posed many questions for doctors, but the answers they found led to key changes in federal guidelines for coronavirus testing, according to a case study.

The patient was an otherwise healthy woman in her 40s who was admitted to University of California (UC) Davis Health with a respiratory infection. Doctors suspected c...

Even after people with mild cases of COVID-19 feel better, new research shows that half still have the virus for up to eight days after symptoms are gone.

That's the conclusion of a small international study of 16 COVID-19 patients in China. The researchers took several throat swabs from all of them.

"The most significant finding from our study is that half of the patient...

Yet another potential vaccine against the new coronavirus is in early development -- one that researchers say could be rapidly made and distributed if it proves effective.

The vaccine has only been tested in lab mice, but it's able to spur the animals' immune systems to produce antibodies against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers at the University of Pittsbur...

A small study out of China bolsters the notion that transfusing the antibody-enriched blood of people who've survived COVID-19 could help patients still fighting for their lives against the disease.

The study of five critically ill patients from near the initial epicenter of the novel coronavirus pandemic found that all five patients survived COVID-19 following the transfusion.

...

It has spread across the globe in just a few short months, sickening hundreds of thousands, but the new coronavirus has the dubious distinction of not really being a living organism, biologists say.

"Viruses aren't considered alive -- in class, I call them pseudo-alive," said Eric Mendenhall, an associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

...

With bogus information about the new coronavirus spreading fast online, how can you separate fact from fiction?

A communications expert at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg said identifying reliable and useful sources of information is key. Here's her advice:

"Be skeptical of social media posts about the COVID-19 virus, even those that have the superficial look of news items, and...

Your teeth provide a detailed account of your life, much as a tree's rings record its history, a groundbreaking study shows.

"A tooth is not a static and dead portion of the skeleton. It continuously adjusts and responds to physiological processes," said lead study author Paola Cerrito, a doctoral candidate studying anthropology and dentistry at New York University (NYU) in New York ...

Two new studies each suggest that dozens of drugs already approved for use in the United States may prove effective against the new coronavirus.

"Repurposing these FDA-approved drugs could be a fast way to get treatment to patients who otherwise have no option," explained the co-author of one of the studies, Dr. Hesham Sadek. He's professor in the departments of internal medicine, mol...

As more people recover from COVID-19, that means more people should have antibodies against the virus. And it's possible that blood donations from those survivors could help protect or treat other people, according to some infectious disease experts.

The general notion is far from new. In the first half of the 20th century, doctors used "convalescent serum" in an effort to treat peopl...

Despite internet rumors to the contrary, the new coronavirus arose from natural causes and was not concocted in a lab, according to scientists who conducted a detailed genomic examination of the virus.

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 illness, shows zero evidence of being artificially engineered, reported a team who published their findings March 17 in Nature Medicine...

You're a little feverish, but you feel good enough to get your shopping done and a quick workout at the gym.

If you do, you could become part of the exponential spread of the coronavirus, a new study concludes.

About 86% of COVID-19 cases in China were milder and went undetected during the two-week ramp-up of the epidemic in January, prior to the country imposing travel...

Cannabidiol -- commonly known as CBD -- might not be all it is touted to be, new research suggests.

Instead, existing evidence on the potential benefits of the compound found in marijuana and hemp has often been backed by industry, scientists said.

The researchers found that of 99 human CBD studies done since 2014, about 62% had some conflict of interest -- including in...

A green tea extract has shown early hints of promise against a serious, progressive form of lung disease, researchers say.

The disease is called pulmonary fibrosis, where scar tissue builds up in the lungs over time, limiting the amount of oxygen the body receives. Eventually, life-threatening lung failure can develop.

There are many types of pulmonary fibrosis, but the most...

The exact method that's now cured two men of HIV infection is not one that's going to be widely available to the nearly 38 million people worldwide living with the virus, experts say.

Still, the news has rekindled hopes of finally winning the war against the virus that causes AIDS.

The Berlin and London patients benefited from a combination of medical and genetic chance, the...

Most clinical trial participants are not told the results of their study -- even though most people want to know, and researchers want to tell them.

The reason: Communication is a big barrier, a new study says. Simply put, researchers and subjects may not speak the same language.

Teaching researchers to make their findings understandable to the lay person could make trial p...

Few heartbreaks are as devastating as when a beloved family dog falls ill with cancer.

But a new research paper could spur development of more and better treatments for a canine companion who has a brain tumor -- because it's possible that those same therapies will help human kids, too. Dogs' brain cancers are genetically akin to those found in children, a new study in the journal ...

Coronaviruses that are common in poultry and livestock worldwide don't jump to humans, but those found in wildlife are another matter, an expert says.

"In wildlife, bats are known to carry over 100 different strains of coronavirus, and wild civets are the source of the coronavirus that causes SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), first reported in China in 2002-2003," said Heather...

U.S. researchers report they have spotted early, subtle signs in the lungs that point to coronavirus infection.

This could help doctors diagnose patients in the early stages of the disease, when it may not be obvious on lung scans, according to the Mount Sinai Health System doctors.

They say they're the first U.S. experts to analyze chest CT scans of 94 patients in China wit...

The crisis aboard the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan shows how germs can spread rapidly through air conditioning systems that can't filter out particles as small as the new coronavirus, one air quality expert says.

The quarantine ended last Wednesday, but not before the number of coronavirus cases reached 690 and three deaths were reported, according to the Asso...

Scientists say that 90% of dengue cases could be slashed by artificially infecting mosquitoes.

Dengue viruses are spread to people by infected mosquitoes. But infecting the insects with Wolbachia bacteria blocks the dengue virus from replicating in mosquitoes and being transmitted between people, the international researchers said in a new study.

Wolbachia is found natur...

A novel combination of two drugs appeared to spur faster regeneration of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, a preliminary study in mice and human tissue found.

Beta cells are crucial to making insulin, a hormone that's deficient in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

The new drug combo pairs an already approved class of type 2 diabetes medications called GLP-...

There is little more magical than the glow of fireflies on a still summer night, but new research suggests that light pollution threatens firefly populations worldwide.

The other major dangers putting some of the more than 2,000 different species of fireflies at risk of extinction include habitat loss and pesticides, according to firefly experts.

There's been a huge increase...

In a first, scientists have used gene-editing technology to create "designer" immune system cells that can fight tumors and survive for months in cancer patients' bodies.

It's a proof of principle, the researchers say -- and an early step toward bringing the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR into cancer treatment.

CRISPR allows researchers to precisely "snip" bits of DNA wit...

A mad dash is afoot to craft a vaccine for the new coronavirus that's ravaging China and starting to spread across the globe, with possibly dozens of labs working on permanent protection against the pathogen.

Researchers say an effective vaccine could be created in a matter of weeks, using advanced techniques.

"We know enough. We can do this. We can actually make a vaccine i...

A single dose of the psychedelic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may bring long-lasting relief to cancer patients who suffer anxiety and depression, a new, small study suggests.

Researchers found that of 15 patients who'd received a one-time treatment with psilocybin, most were still showing "clinically significant" improvements in anxiety and depression four years later.

Th...

Enrollment in clinical trials that can potentially extend the life of cancer patients is too low, a new study finds.

Researchers at Penn State also found that white males with private health insurance and cancers that have spread, and who are treated at academic medical centers, are most likely to enroll in clinical trials.

Lead researcher Dr. Nicholas Zaorsky, of Penn Sta...

Nesyamun, an Egyptian priest who chanted hymns at the grand temple of Karnak in Thebes 3,000 years ago, has been allowed to speak once more.

Well, maybe not speak in full sentences: A British team has re-created the mummified Nesyamun's throat using 3-D technology, allowing it to utter a vowel they believe mimics how the priest sounded.

Here it is:

More than 100 genes appear to be involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), according to the largest genetic study of the condition to date.

The study, involving over 50 centers around the globe, identified 102 genes associated with ASD -- including a few dozen that had not been recognized before.

Some of the genes are also associated with intellectual disabilities and dev...

The cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. created temperatures so hot that one poor soul's brain was transformed into glass, researchers report.

Archaeologists working at the site of Herculaneum -- the other city wiped out in the eruption, alongside Pompeii -- discovered small bits of black glass inside the skull of one of the victims.

Tests of the glassy materia...

Shallower-than-normal brain waves may play a role in serious sleep problems in children with autism, a new study suggests.

Previous research has shown that between 40% and 80% of children with autism have sleep issues, such as trouble falling asleep or waking frequently during the night and rising early. These problems can be significant challenges for the children and their f...

Mosquitoes that can't be infected by or spread dengue virus have been created by scientists.

The researchers genetically engineered the mosquitoes to be resistant to all four types of dengue, a mosquito-borne virus that's a significant global health threat.

This is the first time that mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to be resistant to all types of dengue, which c...

The research is still in its early stages, but scientists say they've developed a low-intensity ultrasound technique that kills cancer cells without damaging healthy cells.

Focused ultrasound is already used to destroy tumors, with most approaches using either high-intensity beams to heat and destroy cells or injected contrast dyes. But both approaches can harm healthy cells and contr...

A new compound might help stem the damage of a heart attack, research in animals suggests.

Giving recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-AB (rhPDGF-AB) to pigs lessened the effect of heart scarring, helped form new blood vessels and reduced the rates of heart arrhythmias, heart failure and sudden cardiac death, researchers found.

"This is an entirely new approach,...

"Space medicine" took another small step forward after an astronaut who developed a blood clot in a neck vein was diagnosed and treated while onboard the International Space Station (ISS), physicians at NASA and elsewhere report.

The research team didn't reveal the astronaut's name, age or gender, but said the ISS crew member developed an asymptomatic thrombosis -- blood clot -- in th...

A new drug might be able to save a person's knees from the ravages of osteoarthritis, researchers report.

People taking the drug, code named MIV-711, had less bone and cartilage loss than others given a placebo.

"We know that bone slowly changes shape as knee osteoarthritis progresses," said lead researcher Philip Conaghan, a professor at the Leeds Institute of Rheumatic an...

For decades, scientists have known that Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by the buildup of clumps of amyloid protein between brain cells. Could these plaques be causing the disease?

That's been a prevailing theory driving Alzheimer's research for years. But a new study suggests the strategy could be wrong.

Researchers reporting Dec. 30 in the journal Neurology have...

Male researchers are far more likely than female colleagues to claim that their findings are especially important, a new study says.

The language used to describe discoveries can affect how much attention researchers get and also affect their career advancement. These findings may help explain why women in medicine and science tend to get paid less and have fewer career opportunities,...

The ongoing debate about postmenopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk may have turned even more muddy: A large, new study suggests that two different types of hormone therapy have opposite effects on women's long-term risk of the disease.

The researchers found that combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) -- with estrogen and progestin -- increases the risk of breast cancer...

Some patients in remission from the blood cancer called follicular lymphoma can be considered cured, a new small study suggests.

Using DNA sequencing, researchers were able to test the patients' blood to see if mutations that caused the cancer were still present two years after treatment. If these mutations aren't found, the patient can be given a clean bill of health, the study auth...

Eye doctors may someday use "smart" contact lenses to track patients' eye health, early research suggests.

A team of scientists in South Korea has packed incredibly small electronic circuitry, batteries and antennae into a soft contact lens. The goal: to monitor eyes for signs of vision trouble or help deliver medicinal eye treatments.

In what's called a "proof of concept" s...

Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly.

New research suggests it's not the stuff of science fiction anymore.

The scientists analyzed plasma -- the cell-free, fluid part of blood -- from more than 4,200 people between the ages of 18 and 95, and found a link between 373 proteins and aging.

"We've known for a long time that measuring ce...

Millions of Americans with heart failure take one of the family of beta blocker medications to help ease the condition. But in many cases, could the meds be doing more harm than good?

A new study found that taking beta blockers was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for patients with a certain form of heart failure.

It's commonly called the "stiff heart" su...

Scientists have developed a method that might eventually allow women to take birth control pills just once a month.

In lab experiments, the researchers found that their tiny drug-delivery device -- contained within a gelatin-coated capsule -- worked as hoped: In pigs, it remained in the stomach, slowly releasing the birth control hormone levonorgestrel for up to one month.

M...

Emergency department patients treated for gunshot wounds to the chest or abdomen are more likely to wind up in the hospital again than those who have such wounds in other areas of the body, a new study finds.

The study included 110 patients with a history of gunshot wounds. Most were men, with an average age of 50. The patients were seen in the emergency department at Thomas Jefferson...

People with peanut allergy must be constantly vigilant to avoid a life-threatening allergic reaction. But researchers report that a new drug injection might offer at least temporary protection against the most severe reactions.

Just one shot of an experimental antibody treatment allowed people with severe peanut allergy to eat about one peanut's worth of peanut protein two weeks late...

Don't count on potted plants to keep your home's air clean.

Dispelling a common belief, researchers at Drexel University in Philadelphia found that natural ventilation does a far better job than houseplants in maintaining air quality in homes and offices.

"This has been a common misconception for some time. Plants are great, but they don't actually clean indoor air quickly e...

Researchers have developed a skin patch that might one day give women the ability to self-administer long-acting birth control.

The patch, which contains "micro-needles" absorbed into the skin, is seen as a possible alternative to current long-acting contraceptives. Those methods -- intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants -- are highly effective at preventing pregnancy....

The deep stages of sleep may give the brain a chance to wash itself free of potentially toxic substances, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that during deep sleep, the "slow-wave" activity of nerve cells appears to make room for cerebral spinal fluid to rhythmically move in and out of the brain -- a process believed to rinse out metabolic waste products.

Those waste pr...