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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: High Blood Pressure".

23 Aug

Your Heart Takes a Hit When You Don’t Sleep and Weekend Slumber Sessions Won’t Protect You, New Study Finds

A new study finds men who don’t get enough sleep during the week experience an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Trying to catch up on your ZZZs over the weekend doesn’t appear to help.

03 Aug

5 Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

If you have high blood pressure, making these key lifestyle changes now can help reduce your risk of serious heart disease.

Health News Results - 422

Teenage boys who have high blood pressure may find themselves on the road to serious heart problems in adulthood.

Swedish researchers found that boys who had high blood pressure at 18 were at risk for heart failure, heart attacks, strokes and death as adults. And the risk began when blood pressure crossed 120/80 mm Hg, a normal reading.

"Hopefully, the results of this ...

While the neurological impact of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been studied, new research suggests TBIs are also hard on the heart.

The research team took a closer look at connections between the two organs, finding that nervous system dysfunction, neuro-inflammation, changes in the brain-gut connection and post-injury health issues may increase risk of both cardiovascular and ...

Winter months can be a challenge for those trying to keep their high blood pressure in check, new research suggests.

In an analysis of more than 60,000 American adults being treated for high blood pressure at six health care centers in the Southeast and Midwest United States, scientists found that systolic blood pressure -- the top number -- rose slightly in winter months, by up to 1.7 mm...

COVID-19 patients face a markedly greater risk for developing persistently high blood pressure, even if they never had blood pressure concerns before, new research indicates.

The rise in risk seen among otherwise heart-healthy patients also appeared to be notably greater among COVID patients than in influenza patients.

The findings, said senior study author

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 21, 2023
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  • Poor sleep takes a toll, and catching up on the weekends just won't fix it, researchers report.

    A small new study showed that heart rate and blood pressure, important measures of cardiovascular health, worsen as the week goes on when someone sleeps only about five hours a night.

    Catching up on sleep over the weekends didn't return those health measures back to normal.

    "Only 65...

    Whether knocking back a little alcohol or a lot, daily drinking is tied to higher blood pressure, a new research review warns.

    Compared with not drinking, just one alcoholic drink a drink a day is associated with higher blood pressure over time, even in people who previously had normal blood pressure levels, according to researchers who analyzed the results of seven prior studies.

    Many women are not being counseled about heart disease after giving birth, a new study finds.

    Only 60% of at-risk women said they were advised about heart health at their postpartum checkup, researchers say.

    About 90% of U.S. women have a doctor visit during what is referred to as the "fourth trimester."

    "We need to find ways to take advantage of this prime opportunity when w...

    It doesn't matter if you exercise every day or squeeze it all into the weekend. If you do the recommended 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, you'll get heart benefits, a new study finds.

    Both regimens protect you from atrial fibrillation (a-fib), heart attack, heart failure and stroke, compared with inactivity, researchers reported in the July 18 issue of the <...

    Patients could find lifesaving benefits in using a home blood pressure cuff.

    New research finds that home blood pressure monitoring saves lives and cuts costs. It also reduces health care disparities in racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents.

    Furthermore, regular self-testing better controls high blood pressure, especially in underserved patients, reducing the risk o...

    A new blood test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can predict imminent preeclampsia, helping pregnant women who are at risk of this severe and sometimes deadly form of high blood pressure.

    The test can identify with 96% accuracy which women with sometimes-vague symptoms will develop preeclampsia within the following two weeks, The New York Times reported this wee...

    One in 10 people with high blood pressure suffer from a treatment-resistant type of hypertension, yet these patients aren't always getting the right medication, a new study finds.

    "Apparent resistant hypertension [aRH] is more common than many would anticipate," said researcher Dr. Joseph Ebinger

    Women who use estrogen to ease menopause symptoms may see their blood pressure rise -- but the way they take the hormone may determine that, a large new study suggests.

    The study, of over 100,000 menopausal women on estrogen therapy, found that pills seemed to have a greater effect on blood pressure than estrogen delivered via skin patch, gel or vaginal preparation.

    Experts stressed...

    Women who've had certain pregnancy complications have significantly higher odds for a stroke than women with uncomplicated pregnancies, new research shows.

    Moreover, these strokes may occur at a relatively early age, according to investigators at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

    Also, compared to women with a single uncomplicated pregnancy, w...

    Could an electronic chest "tattoo"-- wireless, lightweight and razor-thin -- upend heart monitoring and lower the odds of heart disease for folks who are at high-risk?

    Just possibly.

    The clear patch in question is not quite 4 by 5 inches in size, weighs less than an ounce, and is powered by a battery no bigger than a penny and just like a temporary tattoo sticker, it's designed to ...

    If you're longing for a nap, try to keep it short.

    Researchers found that siestas of 30 minutes or more in Murcia, a region of Spain, where it's common to nap, were linked to a higher risk of obesity, a group of conditions called metabolic syndrome and high blood pressure.

    "Not all siestas are the same. The length of time, position of sleep and other specific factors can affect t...

    Dealing with discrimination at work -- from bosses or coworkers -- may be enough to send your blood pressure through the roof, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among more than 1,200 U.S. workers, those who felt they often faced on-the-job discrimination were 54% more likely to develop high blood pressure, versus workers with little exposure to such bias.

    Over eight year...

    Maintaining tight control of your blood pressure could help your brain, potentially reducing your risk of stroke, a new study says.

    When blood pressure was intensively managed in adults over age 50, patients had fewer lesions in the brain's white matter, according to researchers.

    Having this consistently controlled blood pressure significantly reduced the risk of stroke, they found...

    Be forewarned: High blood pressure in your 30s may lead to poorer brain health in your 70s.

    A new study suggests that treating the condition in young and middle-aged adults may help prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease later on, especially in men.

    For the study, researchers examine...

    A potentially dangerous complication of pregnancy might be prevented by carefully screening women late in pregnancy and planning a timed delivery for those at high risk, a new study reports.

    More than half of all preeclampsia cases that occur late in pregnancy could be warded off through induced labor or cesarean section provided to high-risk women, according to an analysis published onli...

    It can be downright discouraging to work hard to lose 10 pounds, only to regain a few later.

    But don't be downhearted -- a new evidence review says the important heart health benefits of weight loss are sustained even if some of the weight comes back.

    People who drop some pounds still have lower blood pressure and better cholesterol and blood sugar numbers even if they regain a litt...

    Even modest weight gain above the average puts kids at risk for high blood pressure, new research shows.

    "Hypertension during youth tracks into adulthood and is associated with cardiac and vascular organ damage," said lead study author Corinna Koebnick of Kaiser P...

    In yet another example of the mind-body connection, people with depression symptoms may face an increased risk of having a stroke, as well as a worse recovery afterwards.

    A new international study, published online March 8 in the journal Neurology, found about 18% of those who had...

    Young adults in the United States carry an increasing burden of heart health risk factors, making it more likely they'll suffer a heart attack and stroke as they age, a new study warns.

    More adults ages 20 to 44 are obese and diabetic than a decade ago, and they are more likely to have poorly controlled blood pressure, according to the study published March 5 in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 6, 2023
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  • Black women who are exposed to certain forms of racism may be more likely to develop heart disease, researchers say.

    Specifically, Black women who said they faced discrimination in employment, housing and in their interactions with the police were 26% more likely to develop heart disease than their counterparts who had not experienced such structural racism.

    Structural racism refers...

    A new study links high blood pressure during pregnancy with cognitive issues later in life, adding to known risks such as stroke and heart disease.

    Women with preeclampsia -- high blood pressure during pregnancy that may be accompanied by kidney or other organ damage -- may have even more cognitive decline later compared to those with gestational high blood pressure, which does not affect...

    An artificial sweetener commonly used in processed foods could be increasing people's risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study argues.

    Erythritol is a natural sugar alcohol found in many vegetables and fruit. Even the human body produces small amounts of erythritol.

    But higher levels of the sweetener added to processed foods might increase people's risk of blood clots, researche...

    Causes of different kinds of dementia vary, but about 40% are affected by risk factors a person can influence through lifestyle choices.

    Two University of Michigan neurologists offer 10 tips for modifying those risks.

    1. Keep blood pressure in check.
    2. Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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    4. February 25, 2023
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    Having the lingering symptoms known as long COVID after a COVID-19 infection more than doubles the risk of developing new heart symptoms, according to new research.

    "COVID-19 is more than a simple respiratory disease -- it is a syndrome that can affect the heart,"said lead study author Joanna Lee, a medical student at David Tv...

    The United States saw a significant decline in the overall rate of heart attack-related deaths over the past 20 years, and the gap in the rate of heart attack deaths between white people and Black people narrowed by nearly half.

    "It's good news,"said study lead author Dr. Muchi Ditah Chobufo, a cardiology fellow at ...

    Sticking to a consistent sleeping routine may help keep your arteries clear as you age, new research suggests.

    Conversely, older adults who slept for a varying number of hours each night and tended to fall asleep at different times were more likely to develop hardening of the arteries, which can lead to heart attack or stroke, the researchers reported.

    "Sleep is super important to o...

    Americans eat too much salt and more than a dozen favorite and convenience foods are largely to blame.

    Nearly 90% of Americans exceed dietary guidelines for sodium intake, a risk factor for high blood pressure and heart disease.

    You might think about cholesterol when you consider your cardiovascular health.

    It's also important to consider your A1C levels.

    Sugar is just as bad for your heart as cholesterol -- if not worse, said Dr. Daniel Lodge, a thoracic surgeon at Penn State Health Specialty S...

    Add high blood pressure to the list of problems associated with concussions among former pro football players.

    Researchers at Harvard University's Football Players Health Study linked a history of concussions to elevated risk for high blood pressure among ex-NFL players.

    The results suggest that treating former athletes who have both high blood pressure and a history of concussions ...

    Major pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia and preterm birth, should be recognized as lifelong risk factors for women's heart disease, new research suggests.

    Women who experience any of the five major pregnancy complications have an increased risk of ischemic heart disease up to 46 years after delivery, says the study published Feb. 1 in the BMJ.

    The five compl...

    Dave Conway had a heart attack in 2018. He was only 30.

    The Clintonville, Ohio, resident had been experiencing fatigue and shortness of breath, finally going to the emergency room with what he thought was pneumonia. Instead, he learned he'd had a "widowmaker"heart attack and a 100% blockage in a major artery.

    "I thought people who had heart attacks or heart disease were older people...

    People who suffer a heart attack or stroke in middle age may develop memory and thinking problems earlier in life, too, a new study finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 25 in the journal Neurology, focused on people who had developed premature cardiovascular disease. That refers...

    For people with a specific type of high blood pressure, British researchers led a new study on a particular CT scan that may enable a cure.

    In about 5% to 10% of high blood pressure cases, the source is a gene mutation in the adrenal glands, according to earlier research. Tiny benign nodules in the glands lead to excessive production of the steroid hormone aldosterone, which causes salt t...

    It's never too late for an expectant mom to adopt healthy habits for her baby and herself.

    The American Heart Association (AHA) offers some heart-healthy tips.

    "Pregnancy is often a pivotal time in a woman's life from both short- and long-term perspectives," said Dr. Michelle Albert...

    Could taking hot baths at night help seniors keep high blood pressure at bay? A new Japanese study suggests it just might work.

    The finding follows a fresh analysis of a decade-old survey that looked at high blood pressure risk among older residents of Beppu.

    Beppu is a city widely known for having the most natural hot springs in all of Japan. And the new analysis revealed that tho...

    Plenty of people enjoy a cup or two, or maybe three or four, of coffee every day.

    But new research shows that people with severe high blood pressure ("hypertension") should steer clear of drinking too much java.

    The study found that for those with blood pressure of 160/100 or higher, drinking two or more cups of coffee daily was associated with a doubled risk of death from heart di...

    Adding a little yoga to an exercise routine can be the fix someone needs to drop high blood pressure, a small study suggests.

    "As observed in several studies, we recommend that patients try to find exercise and stress relief for the management of hypertension [high blood pressure] and cardiovascular disease in whatever form they find most appealing,"said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 8, 2022
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  • One in 10 women will develop high blood pressure for the first time in their lives during the year after they give birth to a child, a new study finds.

    "The study findings have implications for postpartum care, particularly among patients without a history of hypertension,"said study lead author Samantha Parker

    Toss out your salt shaker if you want to lower your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Even if you already follow a low-salt diet, sprinkling salt on your food can raise your risk for heart disease, heart failure and plaque in cardiac arteries, researchers report.

    "Compared with people who always added salt to foods -- usually at the table -- those who sometimes, rare...

    Persistent asthma may take a toll on the heart, not just the lungs, a new study suggests.

    When the respiratory condition is relentless, it appears tied to plaque in the carotid arteries, increasing the risk for heart attack and stroke, researchers say.

    The carotid arteries -- large arteries on the sides of the neck -- carry blood to the brain.

    In a study of more than 5,...

    Mindfulness is a centuries-old practice that's become trendy in recent years -- and a new study now says it can help your heart health.

    Training in mindfulness can help people better manage their high blood pressure by helping them stick to healthy lifestyle changes, a new clinical trial reports.

    An eight-week customized mindfulness program helped people lower their systolic blood p...

    Some patients with high blood pressure can't get it under control with standard medications, but a new study shows an experimental drug is up to the task of treating these tough-to-treat cases.

    Why do some folks struggle more with managing their high blood pressure than others? When the hypertension i...

    A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

    Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

    Although blood pressure levels among Americans rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests things could have been far worse.

    "We expected blood pressure control to be worse due to decreased physical activity, stress, poor sleep and other cardiovascular disease risk factors that worsened during the pandemic," said study leader

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2022
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  • Regular home monitoring can help with blood pressure control, but only half of people who have hypertension or other related conditions actually do it, a new study found.

    Of Americans ages 50 to 80 who take blood pressure me...

    When it comes to why U.S. heart patients wind up in the emergency room, uncontrolled high blood pressure (or "hypertension") fuels about one-third of those medical crises.

    "These visits resulted in hospital admission less than 3% of the time and with very few deaths -- less than 0.1%. This suggests th...

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