Duren Apothecary Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Social Networks".

07 Aug

Posting on Social Media While High

People who use social media or text while on drugs often regret it, study finds

Health News Results - 71

Technology can help you maintain social connections if you're staying home during the coronavirus pandemic, an expert says.

"When using technology to stay connected, prioritize keeping deeper, meaningful connections with people," said Stephen Benning, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Benning suggests using Skype or other video mes...

Could clues to future health emergencies be found in Facebook posts?

Maybe so, according to a new study that discovered there are changes in users' posts before they seek emergency care.

For the study, researchers analyzed the Facebook posts and medical records of more than 2,900 patients at a U.S. urban hospital, including 419 who'd had a recent emergency department visit f...

Having a large social network of other people with the same sexual identity benefits the health of LGBT people, a new study finds.

Previous studies have found that discrimination and related stress can be harmful to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, so researchers decided to look at social factors that may reduce that harm.

The investigators...

Nearly 1 in 5 American adults has mistaken beliefs about vaccines, and misinformation is more common among those who rely on social media than on traditional media, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed nearly 2,500 adults nationwide in the spring and fall of 2019, when the United States was dealing with its largest measles outbreak in decades, and found that up to 20% of respon...

Older women with colon or rectal cancer are more likely to die early if they lack support from family, friends or others, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers looked at more than 1,400 postmenopausal women with colon or rectal cancer who were enrolled in the long-term U.S. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study.

Compared to those with strong social support, those wit...

Could that nasty online review you wrote about your neighborhood restaurant help the local health inspector do a better job?

Yes, according to researchers who found that such reviews may help monitor a restaurant's cleanliness between health inspections.

Because local health departments have to deal with so many restaurants -- for example, there are 20,000 restaurants in Ne...

Combine the vast power and reach of social media, the unlimited resources of websites and apps, and the unquenchable thirst for health information and motivation. The result is a powerful tool for researchers, health care providers and patients. But like many aspects of the internet, it can be a mixed blessing.

"Social media are an incredible product to provide support and promote go...

Vaping has been deemed hazardous for your health by public officials across America, but you wouldn't know it by scrolling through Instagram.

Instead, researchers discovered that Instagram posts that promote use of the devices outnumber anti-vaping content by a shocking ratio of 10,000 to 1.

Nearly one-third of U.S. teens use e-cigarettes. In 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Adm...

Electronic cigarettes are marketed as an aid to quitting smoking, but most young people who vape say that's not why they indulge.

Instead, six out of 10 said they vape to relax and they'd miss the stress relief of vaping if they quit, a new survey sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) shows.

"We're hearing this narrative that people are vaping to qui...

The more often young teens turn to social media, the more prone they are to eating disorders, new research suggests.

While the study does not prove social media use causes eating disorders, it raises a red flag, said study author Simon Wilksch. He's a senior research fellow in psychology at Flinders University, in South Australia.

The study looked at close to 1,000 middle sc...

Parents can relax a little about how much time their kids spend in front of screens, new research suggests.

A large review of the scientific evidence on the topic concluded that media time overall is not associated with the academic performance of children or teens.

But the more time kids spend watching TV or playing video games, the more likely their grades will suffer, the...

Do you ever think that being more at ease at social and business functions could make you happier or possibly help you get ahead at work?

Your personality greatly influences your life because it influences so many aspects of your day-to-day world, from personal to business relationships, from your mental to your physical well-being.

The Five Traits That Define Personali...

Bingeing on social media isn't good for any teen, but new research has pinpointed three ways in which hours spent on Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Facebook may harm the mental health of young girls in particular.

"Almost all of the influence of social media on mental health could be explained by the three mechanisms examined -- namely experiencing cyberbullying, sleeping for less t...

In a new study, more than a third of young people surveyed said they'd posted on social media while under the influence of drugs, while more than half had called someone or sent a text.

But in the cold light of day, one in five said they regretted a social media post made while high, the study found. About a third of those who called or texted regretted that choice the next day.

The evidence continues to mount that staying socially engaged as you age helps keep dementia at bay.

In a new study, British researchers found that being socially active in your 50s and 60s may reduce the risk of developing dementia.

The findings showed that people in their 60s who interacted with friends nearly every day had a 12% lower risk of developing dementia than ...

Join a book club, take a cruise or just visit friends -- new research supports the notion that social activities help stave off mental decline as you age.

The study found that seniors with high levels of an Alzheimer's-linked protein in their brains were able to slow any mental decline if they got out and socialized regularly.

So, "social engagement may be an important marke...

Too much social media might be too much for the mental well-being of teenagers, new research suggests.

The more that teens used social media and watched television, the greater their risk of depression, the study found.

"Our research reveals that increased time spent using some forms of digital media in a given year predicts depressive symptoms within that same year," said s...

A lack of positive connections with others may do more than make older women lonely, with new research suggesting it can also weaken their bones.

In a long-term study of more than 11,000 postmenopausal women in the United States, lower bone mineral density was associated with higher "social strain," a measure of negative social interactions and relationships. Weaker bones were also ti...

Social media is helping spur the e-cigarette epidemic among America's teens, a new study suggests.

Nearly 15,000 Instagram posts related to Juul, the most popular e-cigarette brand, were released between March and May 2018, researchers found.

More than half the posts focused on youth culture or lifestyle-related content that would appeal to teens, according to results publis...

You might be more apt to seek out a face-lift, a new nose, hair implants or a boob job if you're a fan of posting selfies on social media, a new study reports.

Adults who regularly use social media are more likely to consider getting plastic surgery to improve their online appearance, particularly if they prefer photo-heavy sites and apps, the researchers found.

Furthermore,...

Being an Instagram influencer isn't always a good thing. New research found that vulnerable young people who see online posts of self-harm -- like cutting -- may copy those destructive behaviors.

Almost one-third of teens and young adults who reported seeing self-harm posts on Instagram said they had performed the same or similar self-harming behavior afterwards.

Seeing th...

Young Americans tend to accept the popular notion that their generation is self-centered and entitled, but they also resent those labels, new research suggests.

In a series of surveys, researchers found that most people -- regardless of age -- believed the narcissistic stereotype often assigned to millennials and Generation Z.

Young adults, themselves, generally bought into ...

Teens spend countless hours glued to their phones and tablets, continually posting to social media, but British researchers report that might not be as terrible as many parents may think.

It appears that teens who are less satisfied with their lives do tend to spend more time on Snapchat, Instagram and the like, but the link between life satisfaction and time spent on social media was...

Traditional media, including TV and magazine ads, tend to portray ideals of physical perfection that can fuel worries about body image and eating disorders. A study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that spending hours on social media is linked to these issues, too.

In particular, people in the top 25% of high-volume social media users were more than twice...

Hormone-based treatment might improve social function in people with autism, a pair of new clinical trials suggests.

Both focused on vasopressin, a hormone that has been implicated in the brain's ability to manage social behavior.

In the first trial, vasopressin given as a nasal spray helped improve social responsiveness in kids with autism, said lead researcher Karen Parker...

A smartphone application that works with Google Glass might help kids with autism build their social skills, a small clinical trial suggests.

Researchers found that over six weeks, kids who used the app at home with their families made greater gains in certain social abilities, compared to those who stuck with their usual therapy alone.

Experts said the findings, published o...

Though they often dread social events, many introverts find they're not as bad as feared and some have learned to fake an outgoing personality to get through the experience.

In the business world, socializing is a key to success, said Erik Helzer, who led a team that examined the psychological implications for both introverts and extroverts. Helzer is an assistant professor of managem...

Young Americans may be more vulnerable to depression, distress and suicidal thoughts or attempts than their parents' generation, and social media might be fueling that troubling trend.

So claims a review of a decade's worth of data on roughly 200,000 teens between the ages of 12 and 17, and 400,000 young adults over 18.

Investigators found that beginning in the mid-2000s, th...

For young adults, drugs and distracted driving are well-recognized health threats. Far less attention is paid to loneliness.

But loneliness is common -- and it is a particular problem for people aged 18 to 24, a new study suggests.

"We have this stereotype of the lonely old person in poor health, and the robust, socially active young person," said James Maddux, a senior scho...

Getting older can be a lonely business, and a new survey shows that health problems only make matters worse.

The online poll of more than 2,000 adults, aged 50 to 80, revealed that one in four said they feel isolated from other people at least some of the time, and one in three say they don't have regular companionship.

Health played a role in just how lonely someone was. Th...

There's lots to be concerned about when it comes to kids and modern forms of communication, such as social isolation and cyberbullying.

But a new study reports a bright side to all that texting and social media -- it keeps children connected to their parents after a divorce.

The researchers also found that when kids and the parent no longer living at home stayed in contact, ...

First came confusion, shock and fear, as people struggled to process the emergency warning they'd received.

"There's a missile threat here right now guys. I love you all and I'm scared as [expletive deleted]."

Later came anger, mistrust and denunciation, when they found the frightening warning had been false.

"And now, should there be another ballistic missile thre...

Social media is now a key part of American youngsters' lives, so parents need to provide guidance and rules to help them enjoy its benefits and protect them from potential dangers, experts say.

Social media can help kids connect and find others who share their interests and concerns, SAY specialists at the Children's Hospital Los Angeles Health Network, which comprises more than 160 ...

Time spent on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook probably isn't driving teenagers to depression, a new study contends.

In fact, Canadian researchers found the relationship worked in the opposite direction -- teenage girls who were already depressed tended to spend more time on social media, to try to feel better.

These findings run counter to a series of recent studies that sai...

Two-thirds of stroke survivors who live at home have good mental health, and social support plays an important role, researchers say.

The new study included 300 stroke survivors, aged 50 and older, in Canada. Survivors living in long-term care facilities, who tend to have the most serious disabilities, were not included.

Stroke survivors were said to be in good mental health...

Millennials struggling with depression aren't being helped by their use of Facebook, Instagram or Snapchat, a new study reports.

College students who meet the criteria for major depressive disorder tend to use social media more often and are more heavily addicted to social media, researchers found.

They're also more likely to use social media in ways that exacerbate or highl...

The hangover is bad enough. But for binge-drinking young people, embarrassing social media posts can be another headache.

College students often show signs of social media "addiction" and can suffer significant consequences, according to the authors of a new study.

"During these times when young students are feeling disinhibited by alcohol, they may be even more likely than...

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram -- the list of popular social media outlets is long and always expanding. But could staying connected through them lead to depression?

That's the question posed by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Nearly 1,800 Americans, aged 19 to 32, answered questionnaires about their activity on 11 popular social media sites....

Late-night tweeting leads to poorer next-day performance by professional basketball players, according to a new study that highlights how social media can affect sleep.

For the study, researchers examined statistics for games played between 2009 and 2016 by 112 National Basketball Association players who were verified Twitter users.

After sending tweets during typical sleepi...

For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain.

Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness.

So concludes a small analysis that tracked the impact such sites had on the mental health of 143 users between the a...

People may rely on social media such as Facebook to showcase the highlights of their lives, like vacations. But new research suggests the language they use in posts might also help predict depression.

Using sophisticated software, researchers were able to scan social media posts and detect depression months before it was apparent on clinical screening tests.

"Social media h...

Next time you struggle to put a name to a face, go easy on yourself.

You probably recognize thousands of people.

Participants in a British study recognized 1,000 to 10,000 faces, with the average number being an astonishing 5,000. The faces included people they knew from their personal lives, as well as famous people.

"Our study focused on the number of faces peo...

When it comes to money, nice people really are more likely to finish last, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 3 million people and found that those who were nice were at increased risk for bankruptcy and other financial problems.

Why?

They just don't value money as much as other people do, according to the study published Oct. 11 in the ...

Many American teens are sleep-deprived, and parents blame their attachment to electronics, new survey results show.

Researchers at the University of Michigan conducted a national poll of more than 1,000 parents with at least one child between 13 and 18 years old.

"This poll suggests that sleep problems are common among teens and parents believe late-night use of electronic...

Politics weren't their only target.

New research suggests that Russian trolls and social media bots also tried to sow false information on Twitter about the supposed "dangers" of vaccines.

Researchers analyzed thousands of tweets sent between July 2014 and September 2017. They identified misleading tweets about vaccines from several accounts belonging to the same Russian tro...

One of every three American teens has not read a book just for the fun of it in a year, a new study finds.

That's because they're busy texting, checking social media and playing video games four to six hours a day.

The insight into their media habits comes from an analysis of data from more than 1 million teens who were surveyed between 1976 and 2016. In recent years, less t...

Nearly 40 percent of teen drivers in the United States say they text while driving, a new survey finds.

Researchers analyzed survey data from teen drivers aged 14 and older in 35 states and found that more than a third said they'd texted while driving at least once in the month before the survey. In 34 of the 35 states, text messaging by drivers under the age of 21 is illegal.

...

Keeping that smartphone handy while out with friends may backfire: The pull of digital technology is distracting and drains enjoyment out of face-to-face interactions, new research suggests.

A pair of studies focused on cellphone use showed those who keep their phones easily accessible while eating out feel more preoccupied and bored -- and enjoy the dining experience less.

<...

Sexting can lead to dissing.

That appears to be one takeaway from a small survey of North American adults in committed relationships who share explicit visuals and/or texts via mobile phones with each other.

While the survey suggests that some couples who engage in sexting do see improvements in their real-world sex life, the virtual practice was linked to a rise in ambival...

Most people seeking romantic partners online try for someone "out of their league."

That's the conclusion of researchers who analyzed data from online dating networks in Boston, Chicago, New York and Seattle. They found most of the people contacted prospects who were considered 25 percent more desirable than the seeker.

The study, published Aug. 8 in the journal Science A...

Show All Health News Results