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Health News Results - 143

Screening for breast and ovarian cancer genes might be added to the list of medical tests that can be safely and effectively done from home, new research suggests.

The study looked at screening for BRCA1, BRCA2 and other gene mutations linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have as much as a 7 in 10 chance of getting breast canc...

Women with cancerous cells in their milk ducts -- also known as DCIS -- are at a high risk for developing fatal breast cancer, British researchers report.

DCIS is short for ductal carcinoma in situ, an early form of breast cancer. With stepped-up breast screening, it has become an increasingly common diagnosis.

Though it's not immediately life-threatening, DCIS more than dou...

The human body is teeming with bacteria, and a new study finds the same is true of many cancers -- raising questions about what role microbes might play in the diseases.

Researchers have already known that tumors in certain areas of the body -- like the gut -- harbor bacteria of their own. But the new research reveals that a range of cancers, including those of the breast, lungs, bone...

Black and white women share genes that increase the risk for breast cancer, a new study finds.

These genes include BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2, each of which is associated with a more than sevenfold risk of breast cancer. Women of both races also share four other genes linked with a moderately increased risk, according to researchers.

"This means that the multi-gene panels that...

The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay.

A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles.

"We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being de...

There's good news for women: Getting a mammogram regularly can cut their odds of advanced and sometimes fatal breast cancers, a new study says.

European researchers tracked data from nearly 550,000 women in Sweden who were eligible for mammography screening.

The team compared rates of advanced and breast cancers that were fatal within 10 years after diagnosis for women who g...

Medicaid expansion under Obamacare has increased access to mammograms for impoverished older women, a new study suggests.

In those states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), women who didn't have access to this breast cancer screening tool have it now, the study authors said.

"The ACA created a natural experiment in which some states expanded Medica...

Guidelines for the prioritization and treatment of breast cancer patients during the coronavirus pandemic have been released by a group of U.S. medical organizations.

"As hospital resources and staff become limited, it is vital to define which breast cancer patients require urgent care and which can have delayed or alternative treatment without changing survival or risking exposure to...

Whether she gets it from fruits, beans, grains or vegetables, dietary fiber appears to at least slightly lower a woman's risk for breast cancer, a comprehensive new review finds.

The review covered data from 20 different trials involving millions of women. It found that high levels of total fiber consumption "was associated with an 8% lower risk of breast cancer," compared to low ...

Cholesterol-lowering statins are commonly used to help prevent heart disease. Now a new study hints that they could shield women's hearts from the harms of certain breast cancer drugs.

The study focused on women in Canada who'd been treated with either chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines or the medication Herceptin. Though the treatments can be lifesaving, they can also damage th...

New treatments for melanoma have dramatically reduced deaths from this often fatal skin cancer.

Leaders of a new study report that the death rate from aggressive melanoma that spread to other organs plummeted 18% between 2013 and 2016, after jumping 7.5% between 1986 and 2013. The figures apply to white Americans, the group that accounts for nearly all cases of melanoma in th...

People with a history of certain cancers have more than double the risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, a new study says.

A-fib is a common disorder that can lead to palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. Untreated, it can cause blood clots, stroke and heart failure, and people with a-fib have five times the risk of stroke than other people.

"When we looked ...

A significant number of older women with breast cancer may have genetic mutations that put them at risk of additional cancers, particularly ovarian cancer, a new study finds.

The researchers said that as many as one in 40 postmenopausal women with breast cancer before age 65 has a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Currently, the guidelines emphasize genetic testing in ...

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

Breast size should be considered when positioning a breast cancer patient during radiation therapy, researchers say.

Even at low doses, radiation targeted at breast tumors can also affect nearby organs such as the heart and lungs, so patients are positioned lying face down to protect the heart and lungs as much as possible, the researchers explained.

However, breast size may...

Regular exercise can benefit black cancer survivors' physical and mental health, but most don't get the recommended amount of activity, a new study says.

Cancer survivors should get at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).

For most cancers, black patients have a higher risk of dying from their diseas...

The immunotherapy drug Keytruda might offer a new treatment option to women with an aggressive form of breast cancer, a clinical trial suggests.

The study found that for women with "triple-negative" breast cancer, adding Keytruda to standard chemotherapy improved their odds of responding.

And in the months afterward, women treated with the drug were less likely to see their ...

Female firefighters are exposed to chemicals that may be linked with breast and other types of cancer, researchers say.

Compared to women working in offices, female firefighters in San Francisco are exposed to higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These chemicals are used in firefighting foam and uniforms, grease- and water-resistant coatings and in fabrics, fur...

As rural hospitals and specialty care units close, a new study shows that some breast cancer patients are forced to travel long distances for their treatments.

University of Minnesota researchers found that those living in rural parts of the United States travel three times as far as urban women for radiation therapy.

The study, led by Ph.D. student Colleen Longacre, analy...

Red dresses and pink ribbons have helped millions of Americans become aware of the separate tolls heart disease and breast cancer take on women. But not everyone is aware of how the illnesses can intersect.

Heart disease - the No. 1 killer of women - can sometimes be a complication of breast cancer treatment. Older women who survive breast cancer are more likely to die of heart disea...

High levels of the sex hormone testosterone may trigger different health problems in men and women, a new study reveals.

In women, testosterone may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, while in men it lowers that risk. But high levels of testosterone increase the risk for breast and endometrial cancer in women and prostate cancer in men, the researchers reported.

"Our fi...

Most women won't be surprised by this finding: Less than one-third of women worldwide are satisfied with the size of their breasts.

But a new study suggests that what many women may not realize is their dissatisfaction could have implications for their health.

Surveys of more than 18,500 women in 40 countries, average age 34, found that 48% wanted larger breasts, 23%...

Minority women with breast cancer are less likely to have insurance, which could lower their odds of survival, researchers say.

"Having adequate health insurance for all could reduce the persistent racial outcome disparities in breast cancer," said study lead author Dr. Naomi Ko, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

She added that early d...

A 29% drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to the latest American Cancer Society (ACS) annual report.

Cancer deaths in the United States fell 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest-ever single-year decrease.

That record drop was spurred by a rapid decl...

Machines can be trained to outperform humans when it comes to catching breast tumors on mammograms, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Google and several universities are working on an artificial intelligence (AI) model aimed at improving the accuracy of mammography screening. In the Jan. 1 issue of Nature, they describe the initial results: Computers, it seems, can beat radi...

Having dense breast tissue raises a woman's odds for breast cancer, so many states require providers to notify women if a mammogram finds they have dense breast tissue.

But a new study suggests that the notifications may be having little impact in alerting women to their added breast cancer risk.

The goal of dense breast notifications is to spur a conversation between a wom...

Exercise may reduce the odds you'll develop any of seven types of cancer -- and a new study suggests the more you exercise, the lower your risk.

That's the conclusion of researchers who pooled data from nine published studies that included more than 750,000 men and women.

"We found that the recommended amount of physical activity was in fact associated with significantly r...

Losing weight might be a powerful weapon against breast cancer, a new study suggests.

"Our results suggest that even a modest amount of sustained weight loss is associated with lower breast cancer risk for women over 50," said study author Lauren Teras, a senior principal scientist with the Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group at the American Cancer Society (ACS).

"The...

Many U.S. women with breast cancer ultimately die of other causes, a new study finds, highlighting the need for survivors and their doctors to pay attention to overall health.

In recent decades, advances in breast cancer treatment have meant that more women are becoming long-term survivors, which also means that other health issues will become important in their lives.

In th...

The ongoing debate about postmenopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk may have turned even more muddy: A large, new study suggests that two different types of hormone therapy have opposite effects on women's long-term risk of the disease.

The researchers found that combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) -- with estrogen and progestin -- increases the risk of breast cancer...

A long-term study comparing two types of radiation treatment for early breast cancer found that accelerated partial breast radiation (APBI) appeared to do as well as standard whole breast radiation for keeping cancer at bay.

The study looked at 10-year recurrence rates. The findings mean the partial breast procedure may offer women another choice for treating early-stage breast cance...

Nearly six years after stopping a five-year regimen of the breast cancer drug anastrozole, women at high risk for breast cancer were 50% less likely to have been struck by the disease, new research shows.

The trial included more than 3,800 postmenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer. They were deemed to be at high risk for a variety of reasons, including having two or mor...

Two experimental drugs show real promise against an aggressive, treatment-resistant form of breast cancer that's spread to other parts of the body, researchers say.

The tumors in question are called metastatic HER2-positive breast cancers -- named because the tumor cells' surface is populated with a protein called HER2, which is tied to cancer growth. HER2-positive breast cancers acco...

Could permanent hair dyes and chemical straighteners raise a woman's risk of breast cancer? A new study suggests they could.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 47,000 U.S. women, followed for an average of more than eight years as part of the federally funded Sisters Study. All of the women had a sister who'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, but they didn't have breast cancer the...

Health experts already know that women with extremely dense breasts don't get the same benefit from mammography as women without very dense breast tissue. But what hasn't been clear is if MRI screening might spot cancers that mammography didn't.

Now a new study from Dutch researchers found that when MRI was used in between mammography appointments, the women in the study were half as...

Women who get mammograms every two years instead of annually might face a greater risk of being diagnosed with larger, later-stage breast tumors, a new, preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that among 232 breast cancer patients at their hospital, those who'd undergone mammography screening every two years tended to have more advanced tumors: Of tho...

Using herbal products to treat breast cancer that's spread to the skin could slow wound healing and interfere with chemotherapy or hormone treatment, an expert warns.

Many patients try herbal products and creams to treat these skin lesions, according to Dr. Maria Joao Cardoso, head breast surgeon at Champalimaud Cancer Center in Lisbon, Portugal.

"There are many of these the...

Women with advanced breast cancer might find mindfulness can ease their pain, anxiety and depression, a new study suggests.

Mindfulness is the ability to keep your mind focused on the present moment.

"Mindfulness helps us relate to our thoughts, emotions and physical symptoms in a different way," said study author Lauren Zimmaro, a postdoctoral fellow at Fox Chase Cancer Cen...

Here's some worrisome news for folks who manage to survive a heart attack: New research suggests they might be far more vulnerable to developing cancer down the road.

People who suffered a heart health scare -- a heart attack, heart failure or a dangerously erratic heart rhythm -- had a more than sevenfold increased risk for subsequently developing cancer, compared to those with healt...

TUESDAY, Nov. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery may do more than shrink one's waistline: New research suggests it lowers the chances of breast cancer among women with genes that make them vulnerable to the disease.

In a large-scale study that involved more than 1.6 million obese women, those who were at genetically high risk for breast cancer and had weight-loss surger...

There's early promise in the quest for a blood test that might spot breast cancer up to five years before clinical signs of the disease appear, researchers say.

The test identifies specific immune system "autoantibodies," British researchers explained. The immune system produces the antibodies when it comes into contact with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), which are produced by brea...

Delaying surgery for a noninvasive breast cancer can have dire consequences, a new study shows.

Longer delays in surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancer lead to a higher risk of invasive ductal carcinoma and a slightly lower survival rate, researchers found.

"For each month of delay, there was well under a 1% difference in survival. But for each month o...

Women diagnosed with breast cancer between two routine screenings have an increased risk for other types of cancer, a new study finds.

Breast cancer detected between two routine screenings is called interval cancer, and it tends to be more advanced, more aggressive and to have a worse prognosis than cancers found during screenings.

For the study, researchers analyzed data fr...

Due to population growth and aging, the number of cancer cases worldwide is expected to jump 60% by 2040 -- but unhealthy lifestyle habits are likely to make the surge even larger.

That's the conclusion from the new edition of the Cancer Atlas, unveiled Wednesday at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. It notes that unhealthy habits such as smoking, p...

Beyonce Knowles' father first suspected something was wrong when he noticed a dot of blood that kept appearing on his shirts and bedsheets.

"Imagine a piece of white paper and you took a red pen and just put a dot," Mathew Knowles told the New York Times. "That's what it looked like in my T-shirt."

Knowles scheduled a mammogram in July after he squeezed a nipple and a...

Deaths from breast cancer are still declining in the United States, even as more women are being diagnosed with the disease, a new report shows.

Researchers from the American Cancer Society found that the national decline in breast cancer deaths, which began about 30 years ago, is still evident. Between 1989 and 2017, the overall death rate dropped 40%.

The pace of that ...

Entertainment executive Mathew Knowles has fought off breast cancer via a mastectomy and is planning another because testing uncovered a genetic mutation with potentially life-altering ramifications for himself and his family.

Knowles said the cancer appeared in July, leading to the discovery of a mutation in one of the so-called "breast cancer genes," specifically BRCA2.

...

If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Cancer is typically diagnosed by a specialist, but 20% to 50% of cancers are only caught during an ER visit, researchers said.

"Emergency room detection of cancer provides a window to understanding ...

Mammography has saved hundreds of thousands of lives by detecting breast cancer early in women.

Could such regular X-ray screening also help men?

A new study argues there's potential benefit in regular mammograms for men who are at high risk of breast cancer.

Mammography accurately detected dozens of cases of breast cancer in nearly 1,900 men screened during a 12-year pe...

Estrogen therapy may help younger women live longer after having their uterus and ovaries surgically removed, new research reports.

The study found that when women under 60 received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after surgery, their risk of dying during the 18-year follow-up period decreased by almost one-third compared to women taking a placebo.

"In a young woman, it'...

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