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07 Jun

How Many Microplastic Particles Do We Really Consume?

Men, women and children may be consuming tens of thousands of microplastic particles each year.

Health News Results - 28

The mystery of "stinging water" has been solved, scientists say.

Stinging water is the seawater near and around upside-down jellyfish (Cassiopea) -- and swimmers can get stinging, itchy skin while submerged in it, even if they have no direct contact with the creatures themselves.

But it wasn't clear in the past if the jellyfish were to blame for this discomfort, since...

If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

The res...

Drowning death rates at public beaches, lakes and rivers are three to four times lower in states with tighter rules for swimming in such locations, a new U.S. study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to focus on the 20 states with the highest rates and the 10 states with the lowest rates of drowning deaths among people over age 5. Open wat...

Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water systems in violation fell from 1.3% in 2008 ...

With category 3 Hurricane Dorian ravaging the Bahamas as it lumbers toward the east coast of Florida,the National Safety Council offered anyone in its path steps to stay safe.

First, the council urges residents to monitor Dorian's progress and heed government warnings.

It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need during any severe weather. Families should have...

It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.

Climate change is making this terrifying scenario more common in the northern part of the United States, one infectious disease expert says.

These infections are caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. There are about 80,000 such infections each year in the United Sta...

Fluoride exposure from drinking water during pregnancy could be making children less intelligent, a new Canadian study argues.

Expectant moms with higher levels of fluoride in their urine tended to have kids with lower average IQs, based on a study of 601 mother-child pairs from six cities in Canada.

On average, a 1 milligram-per-liter increase in maternal urinary fluoride w...

Your dog bounds heedlessly into a local lake or pond, playfully splashing in the water.

But within minutes, your canine companion is staggering, drooling or suffering seizures. Left untreated, the dog will likely die.

This fate has befallen a handful of pooches exposed to toxic algae blooms this year, experts say.

"Blue-green algae is a bacteria that during certain...

A flesh-eating bacteria has migrated into the Delaware Bay between Delaware and New Jersey, drawn north by the warmer waters of climate change, doctors say.

Five cases of infection with Vibrio vulnificus occurred in 2017 and 2018 along the Delaware Bay, compared to one infection with the devastating bacteria in the eight years prior, researchers said.

The infections r...

Nicole and Jonathan Hughes, a teacher and a physician with three young children, were acutely aware of the dangers of swimming pools and lakes. From fenced-off pools to life jackets to constant supervision, they did everything right.

Tragedy struck anyway.

Last June, as the family was about to head to an Alabama beach for an evening crab hunt, 3-year-old Levi somehow slipp...

Levels of antibiotics in some of the world's rivers are hundreds of times higher than what's considered safe, British researchers report.

For the new study, investigators checked rivers in 72 countries on six continents for 14 widely used antibiotics and found them at 65% of monitored sites.

"The results are quite eye-opening and worrying, demonstrating the widespread co...

Swimming pools are one of the great joys of summer, but U.S. health officials warn that the chemicals that keep the water pristine can land you in the ER.

Between 2008 and 2017, there were more than 4,500 pool chemical-related injuries reported each year, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

"Summer is a great time to enjoy the pool wi...

Drowning can be swift and silent, making it a leading cause of accidental death among children.

To help parents protect their kids in and around the water, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its water safety recommendations.

Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental injury-related death among 5- to 19-year-olds. Nearly 1,000 children in the United S...

No plastic is good for seabirds, but new Australian research finds that balloon bits pose the most deadly threat to marine life.

"Balloons, or balloon fragments, were the marine debris most likely to cause mortality, and they killed almost one in five of the seabirds that ingested them," said study author Lauren Roman, a Ph.D. student at the University of Tasmania's Institute for Mari...

Flooding from hurricanes and other natural disasters increases the risk of skin infections among victims and relief workers, a skin expert warns.

"In 2017, we experienced almost as many flooding events as we did throughout the previous 10 years," said Dr. Justin Bandino. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at San Antonio Military Medical Center, in Texas.

"The health...

Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said Kristie Ebi, one of the report's authors.

Tainted food, trash-filled parklands and even hungry kids: Public health could be increasingly at risk as the U.S. government shutdown drags into its 21st day, experts say.

Crucial inspections intended to protect Americans have either been curtailed or are not being performed because the responsible federal workers have been furloughed, said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director o...

As category 4 Hurricane Michael slammed into northern Florida on Wednesday, the National Safety Council offered residents steps to stay safe.

First, the council urges those in the storm's path to monitor its progress and heed government warnings.

It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need during any severe weather. Families should have emergency plans and a...

True to its storm-of-the-century hype, Hurricane Florence pounded the Carolinas with historic rainfall and catastrophic flooding -- and continuing danger looms in its wake.

Infection and injury are the big threats as cleanup begins, and experts say it's important to be smart as you tackle the dirty work.

"The 'it's-not-going-to-happen-to-me' attitude is what gets people kill...

As Florence unleashes her full fury on the Carolinas, residents who stayed put need to know that flooding will be even more dangerous than the high winds of this hurricane.

Making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., around 7 a.m. Friday, the category 1 hurricane was pounding the historic town of New Bern, which sits just to the north of the city of Wilmington. Already, more than...

With Hurricane Florence barreling toward the Carolinas, the National Safety Council offers steps to stay safe.

As mass evacuations begin in coastal North Carolina, and states of emergency are declared in Virginia and North and South Carolina, the council urges those along the East Coast to monitor the storm's path and heed government warnings.

Florence, which strengthened t...

Along with sun and fun, there's unexpected danger lurking during the summer.

More accidental deaths occur in the United States during July and August than during any other two-month period of the year, according to the National Safety Council.

"Unfortunately, when we look at accidental deaths, summer is not the carefree period we'd like it to be," said Ken Kolosh, manager of...

Is it safe to go in the water this summer? Not if microscopic germs like E. coli or cryptosporidium are swimming in the pool with you, U.S. health officials warn.

"These germs make people sick when they swallow water contaminated with poop," the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated frankly in a news release on Thursday.

The statement accompanied a new repo...

The scorching heat of summer poses dangers to people, but dogs also need protection from soaring temperatures, one veterinarian warns.

Benjamin Brainard, director of clinical research at the University of Georgia's College of Veterinary Medicine, offered the following tips to help pet owners keep their dogs cool when it heats up outside:

  • Never leave dogs in the ...

More than a half million people are treated for swimming-related accidents in the United States in a given year.

With pools, lakes and beaches open, it's tempting to fling yourself into the water. But don't dive in unless you know it's safe to do so, or you could end up with a severe injury, such as a broken neck or spine, medical experts say.

"Always check the depth of the ...

Before you take a dip in the pool this summer, be sure there's not too much chlorine in the water.

Over the past 10 years, more than 500 people in California have been exposed and sickened by too much chlorine while swimming, according to the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR).

More than half of those affected were at public pools, and about 66 percent of t...

Pools, hot tubs and water playgrounds may be synonymous with summertime fun, but they also can be breeding grounds for dangerous germs that could make you violently ill.

In some cases, they can even lead to death, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

And of all the outbreaks from waterborne germs between 2000 and 2014, one-third occurred in pools or hot tubs at hotels, t...

Flint, Mich., isn't the only American city where the water hasn't been safe to drink, new research suggests.

Almost 8 percent of community water systems are plagued by health-based violations of water quality standards in any given year, the study found. That meant up to a quarter of all Americans were affected.

"Generally, the U.S. has high-quality water," said study author...

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