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Results for search "Exercise: Walking".

17 Oct

How Many Daily Steps Does It Really Take to Stay Fit and Trim?

Researchers say the higher your daily step count, the lower your risk of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases.

16 Sep

Walking Speed and Step Count Are Both Important to Your Health, Study Finds

How many daily steps you take and how fast you take them can impact your risk of dementia, heart disease and cancer, researchers find.

Health News Results - 89

Walking your dog gets you moving and out in the fresh air, but head injuries and fractures are very real possibilities, especially for older dog owners, researchers say.

The most common injury from walking a leashed dog that sends folks to the ER is fractured fingers, a new study from Johns Hopkins University found.

But traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are the second-most common inj...

For those who want to get active but feel that joining a gym or exercising on a daily basis is a bridge too far, new research may have found the sweet spot: walking.

After stacking the walking habits of 3,100 adults up against a decade's worth of health outcomes, investigators concluded that those who logged roughly 8,000 steps in a single day — even if only just one day a week —...

A new study hones in on what part of your brain controls walking.

Researchers discovered that two main regions of the cortex were activated as people moved in various ways through an environment. But the occipital place area (OPA) didn't activate during crawling, while the second region, the retrosplenial complex (RSC), did.

RSC supports map-based navigation, according to the resear...

Problems walking and talking or thinking at the same time might be a warning sign of impending dementia, a new study suggests.

Being unable to juggle two tasks simultaneously has been recognized as a sign of mental (or "cognitive") decline after age 65, but this research shows that the ability actually starts to fall off in middle-age. The finding could spur calls for earlier screening, r...

If you feel like the pandemic made you a permanent couch potato, a new study shows you're not alone: Well after lockdown measures were relaxed, many Americans were still taking fewer steps each day.

Researchers found that, on the whole, Americans' daily step count plummeted at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 -- an understandable decline that prior studies have charted.

However...

New moms who live on tree-lined streets may be somewhat less vulnerable to postpartum depression, according to a new study — the latest to link "green space" to better mental health.

The study, of medical records from more than 415,000 new mothers, found that those living in ...

While the idea of getting 10,000 steps a day is bandied about as a good walking goal, that can be intimidating to some people, depending on how fit they are.

Now, new research in adults between the ages of 70 and 90 finds that a much smaller number of steps can make a difference in heart health.

It's possible, according to researchers, that just 3,000 steps a day has benefit...

A brisk 11-minute daily walk can help you live longer, a new University of Cambridge study reports.

Researchers found that 75 minutes a week — 11 minutes daily — of moderate-intensity physical activity is enough to lower a person's risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer.

The investigators estimated that 1 in 10 early deaths could be prevented if everyone got that amount of exe...

If you're over 40, regular exercise may not only keep you fit -- it might keep you out of the hospital, too, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 82,000 British adults, those who regularly exercised were less likely to be hospitalized for various health conditions in the coming years. The list included such common ills as pneumonia, stroke, diabetes complication...

Want to stay healthy well into your golden years? Grab a bag of clubs and hit the green, new research suggests.

Golfing beat walking or even Nordic walking (a full-body workout that consists of walking using specialized poles) when it came to improving several key measures of heart health in the small study.

“The results of this study are meant to encourage older adults to spend m...

It's clear that staying active is key to being healthy, and fitness trackers and smartwatches have become popular tools for tracking activity.

But just how many steps does someone need to take to lose weight?

That's not such a simple a question.

While evidence is limited on exactly how many steps a day it takes to lose weight, experts say to get about 150 to 300 minutes of m...

Starting a walking routine is simple because it requires so little: comfortable, supportive walking shoes and your own two feet.

Unlike gym workouts, the initial expense is small and the schedule is flexible.

“Walking's a great way to work out because we can integrate it into our daily lives,” said

A lot of people wear watches that count their every step as they try to move more.

Now, a new study finds that getting more of those steps each day, along with moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise, could cut the risk of dementia and thinking impairments for women.

For women aged 65 or older, each additional 31 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associat...

Move your body every day to guard against type 2 diabetes.

That's the upshot of a new study that analyzed Fitbit data and type 2 diabetes rates from participants in a nationwide research program, reporting that women who logged more steps each day had a lower risk of diabetes.

"We investigated the relationship between physical activity and type 2 diabetes with an innovative approach...

Taking a quick walk or doing squats after you eat may help you retain muscle mass as you age, new research suggests.

So-called “activity snacks” — short bouts of exercise — may help maintain muscle mass and quality by allowing your body to use more amino acids from food, explained study author Daniel Moo...

Taking that often-cited 10,000 steps a day — or even slightly fewer — may indeed be enough to improve your health, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among 6,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who got at least 8,000 to 9,000 steps daily had reduced risks of developing an array of conditions over seven years. The list included obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, slee...

Wearing a fitness tracker may help you get more steps in -- even if you never give it a glance.

A new study found that folks who wore a pedometer averaged 318 more steps a day than those who didn't, even without specific

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 30, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • There's an easy way to reduce your risk for dementia, heart disease and cancer: Start walking.

    Getting in those recommended 10,000 steps a day makes a real difference, new research affirms, but even fewer will pay big dividends. No matter how many you log, however, step up your pace for...

    Kids who walk, skateboard or ride their bikes to school when they are young are more likely to keep it up as they get older, reaping the health benefits, recent research suggests.

    “The walk to school is a wonderful moment in the day that provides children a glimpse of living an active lifestyle,” said study...

    The COVID-19 pandemic stopped people in their tracks, reducing their physical activity. And daily "step counts" still haven't reached previous numbers, according to a new study.

    Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco examined worldwide trends in physical activity by measuring step counts in the two years following

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 1, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Writer Jenny Block and her chiweenie, Aurora, are on a health kick.

    "We walk at least 1 mile and up to 4 miles in the early morning, before it gets too hot," said the Houston-based author.

    "She needs it, and I need it, so it works out great," said Block, who has shed...

    It's never too late to benefit from regular walks.

    A new study suggests that a 10-minute daily stroll can prolong life in folks well into their 80s and beyond.

    “Adults are less likely to meet activity recommendations as they get older,” said study author Dr. Moo-Nyun Jin of Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital in Seoul, South Korea. “Our study suggests that walking at least o...

    That phrase "no pain, no gain" might truly apply to people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study finds.

    Researchers found that people with PAD who walked at pace that caused discomfort or even pain improved their walking ability.

    "Exercise that induces leg pain is beneficial, though difficult," said senior author Dr. Mary McDermott, a professor at Northwestern University...

    While chronic stress is a key risk factor for heart disease and stroke, most cat and dog owners say pets help them chill out and stay active.

    A new American Heart Association (AHA) survey of 1,000 pet owners found 95% relying on their animal companions for stress relief. About 7 in 10 said they'd rather spend time with their pet than watch television, and nearly half (47%) said their pets...

    America's roads are getting ever more dangerous for pedestrians, a new study finds.

    During the first six months of 2021, there was a 17% increase in pedestrian deaths in the United States - and that just continues the sharp increase seen over the previous 10 years, the researchers noted.

    Want to preserve all those precious memories, including your first kiss and how you felt the first time you got behind the wheel of a car?

    If you do, start moving: New research shows that when sedentary older adults started to exercise, they showed improvements in episodic memory, or the ability to vividly recall meaningful moments and events.

    These benefits were most pronounced amo...

    Four in 10 Americans say they've had at least one heart-related issue during the COVID-19 pandemic, and about one in four who have tested positive say COVID has affected their heart health, according to a new online poll.

    Shortness of breath (18%), dizziness (15%), higher blood pressure (15%) and chest pain (13%) were the top problems reported in the survey of 1,000 American adults.

    <...

    Tempted to take your workout into the great outdoors?

    Be aware that there are both benefits and risks to exercising outdoors during the winter.

    "There's actually some advantages to working out in cold weather -- with no heat and humidity to deal with you may be a...

    Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

    If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

    "Our projections are based on an additional 10 minutes of moderate to vi...

    When older people cut back on physical activity, their risk of type 2 diabetes rises. But walking regularly can help, a new study suggests.

    The more steps you take -- and the more intensely you walk -- the lower your odds for type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

    To assess the link between walking and diabetes risk...

    A few hours of exercise a week may help slow Parkinson's disease, even if it's just moderate activity such as walking or gardening, a new study suggests.

    The key is to be consistent, the researchers found.

    "Although medications can provide people with Parkinson's some symptom relief, they haven't been shown to slow the progression of the disease," said study author Dr. Kazuto Tsukit...

    Contrary to long-held wisdom, teen athletes recover from concussions sooner if they do light aerobic exercise rather than resting in a dark room, new research suggests.

    Instead of so-called "cocoon therapy," new research-supported therapy has young concussion patients getting out of bed and doing protected exercise earlier.

    "What the research found was that adolescents were having a...

    Call it the great pandemic sit-down.

    As COVID-19 turned daily commutes into shuffles between rooms at home, and Netflix replaced time spent at the gym or playing sports, Americans have been sitting a lot more. Now a new study suggests it may be putting their mental health at risk.

    "We knew COVID was going to affect our behavior and what we could do in lots of weird, funky ways that ...

    Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

    The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

    The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children a...

    Many American arthritis sufferers aren't getting any exercise despite its benefits for reducing pain and improving their quality of life, new research shows.

    Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults with arthritis engaged in physical activity in the past month, most often walking, according to a new data analysis ...

    It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

    "They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

    Movement can be very difficult for people with Parkinson's disease, as shaking and stiffness play havoc with balance, coordination and gait.

    There are many different tricks Parkinson's patients can use to improve their walking and avoid injury from a bad tumble -- but a new study reveals that people often have to figure them out on their own, with no help from either a doctor or physical ...

    Miami publicist Robin Diamond is "step-obsessed."

    She aims for 10,000-plus steps every day using her Apple watch and even bought a treadmill during the COVID-19 quarantine to make sure she reaches her daily goal. The 43-year-old has lost 15 pounds since April 2019 and feels better than ever before.

    "Walking saved my sanity and restored my body," she said.

    Now, a new study sugg...

    Take a work break: A small, new study suggests that getting out of your chair every half hour may help improve your blood sugar levels and your overall health.

    Every hour spent sitting or lying down increases the risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, the study authors said. But moving around during those sedentary hours is an easy way to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce t...

    After a stroke, survivors can greatly increase their odds for many more years of life through activities as easy as a half-hour's stroll each day, new research shows.

    The nearly five-year-long Canadian study found that stroke survivors who walked or gardened at least three to four hours a week (about 30 minutes a day), cycled at least two to three hours per week, or got an equivalent amou...

    Women who try to hold their pee during the day might want to rethink that strategy.

    It's time to "get up and go," according to the Urology Care Foundation, which is encouraging women to be proactive about their urological health.

    That, of course, means get up and go to the bathroom if you need to. But the foundation also suggests a number of activities a woman can get up and go...

    Exercise guards against a host of chronic diseases that can plague people as they age, but can it also protect against severe cases of COVID-19?

    New research suggests that's so: Being physically active reduced COVID-19 patients' risk of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death, and even being just somewhat active provided some protection.

    "This is a wake-up cal...

    Going for a brisk walk after a long day at work may be better for your heart than getting all of your exercise on the job.

    New research suggests that while current health guidelines indicate that leisure-time activity and physical activity at work are created equally when it comes to heart health benefits, this may not be the case after all.

    Leisure-time exercise -- whether it be ta...

    Fast-paced walking is painful for the millions of people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). But new research shows that a slower, pain-free pace won't cut it if improvement in mobility is the goal.

    The study included more than 300 of the roughly 8.5 million Americans with PAD. It's a condition in which plaque build-up in arteries slows the flow of blood to the legs.

    "People ...

    Live well, live longer.

    New research offers more evidence that the mantra rings true: People who got regular exercise and ate a healthy diet in middle age had a reduced risk of serious health problems as seniors.

    "Health care professionals could use these findings to further promote and emphasize to their patients the benefits of a healthy diet and a regular exercise schedule t...

    Regular aerobic exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which may help slow mental decline in older adults, a new, small study suggests.

    Researchers from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at 70 men and women diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This means there are slight changes to the brain that affect memory, decision-making or reasoning skills. In m...

    If you saunter and shuffle instead of scurry when you walk, you are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19, British researchers warn.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 412,000 middle-aged Britons and found that among those whose weight was normal, slow walkers were more than twice as likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 3.75 times more likely...

    Anyone who gets frequent migraine symptoms knows the experience: the throbbing, the pain, the visual disturbances.

    Exercise has long been a potential way to reduce migraine triggers, but a new study suggests it could be an especially effective with triggers such stress, depression and trouble sleeping.

    "It's a complex relationship, but we know that exercise, generally speaking, help...

    An inhaled medication might make every day physical activity a bit easier for patients with serious scarring of the lungs, a new clinical trial finds.

    The study, published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved patients with high blood pressure in the lungs caused by interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    ILD is a broad term for progressive scarring of th...

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