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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Coronary-Artery Disease".

09 Jul

Fried Food and Heart Health

Eating fried food even once per week can up your risk of heart disease.

Health News Results - 116

Knowing how much older adults exercise can predict their odds of developing heart disease or dying early, a new study suggests.

Asking patients during atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) screening about their levels of exercise can help start treatment sooner, researchers say.

"With people now living longer, there is a growing need to determine how we can best detect latent...

Women who drink a lot of sodas, sweetened juices and other sugary drinks are at greater risk of developing heart disease, a new study finds.

Those who drink one or more a day have nearly a 20% higher risk than women who never do. And it's not just soda that's problematic: Fruit drinks with added sugars are also a culprit, researchers say.

Though the study does not pro...

Twice as many women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy may be at an increased risk for heart and kidney disease than once thought, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers collected data on more than 9,800 pregnancies among more than 7,500 women in Olmsted County, Minn., who gave birth between 1976 and 1982.

During that time, 659 women had 719 high blood...

Fewer heart attack and stroke patients are seeking medical care since the coronavirus pandemic began and doctors are wondering why.

It's possible that during the pandemic, patients are ignoring symptoms that would otherwise worry them, doctors from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles suggest.

While investigators are trying to figure out what's happening, Dr. Patrick Lyden, a profe...

Electronic cigarettes are touted by some as safer than smoking tobacco. But a new study finds they damage blood vessels just like traditional cigarettes do.

Among hundreds of healthy young adults, researchers found that vaping and smoking cigarettes cause the same harm to arteries that leads to heart attacks, strokes and heart disease.

"The evidence is growing that e-cigar...

Stay-at-home orders mean that many people are making their own morning coffee for the first time. Now, a timely new study suggests the healthiest way is with a drip coffee maker.

Researchers found that coffee drinkers typically enjoyed longer lives than nondrinkers, but only if the java was filtered -- suggesting espresso lovers might be out of luck.

The study, of over 500,0...

Women under age 65 with coronary artery disease are more likely to die if they live in rural areas of the United States, and premature deaths among them have surged, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed nationwide data on premature deaths from coronary artery disease between 1999 and 2017. While premature deaths decreased overall, they remained consistently higher in rural areas --...

Doctors rely on a variety of risk assessments to evaluate how likely a person is to develop heart disease. While the scores provide an invaluable tool for health care professionals and the general public alike, they are not infallible.

For example, they sometimes fail to accurately predict risk in a condition where there's a lack of blood flow to tissues but no obstruction in the hea...

People with high blood pressure and heart disease may be vulnerable to complications from COVID-19, heart experts say.

Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

Based on current knowledge, seniors "with coronary heart disease or high blood pressure may be more susceptible to the coronavirus and more likely to devel...

Folks with clogged arteries do as well with medication and lifestyle changes as they do after undergoing invasive procedures to reopen their blood vessels, a major new clinical trial reports.

Bypass surgery, balloon angioplasty and stenting are no better than drugs, eating right and exercising at reducing the risk of heart attack and death in people with stable ischemic heart disease,...

The new coronavirus may be a respiratory bug, but it's becoming clear that some severely ill patients sustain heart damage. And it may substantially raise their risk of death, doctors in China are reporting.

They found that among 416 patients hospitalized for severe COVID-19 infections, almost 20% developed damage to the heart muscle. More than half of those patients died.

...

Women with coronary artery disease have less narrowing in their blood vessels but more chest pain than men with the condition, a new study finds.

In coronary artery disease, plaque build-up in arteries results in reduced blood flow (ischemia) to the heart.

The study included more than 1,100 women and more than 4,000 men whose results on cardiac stress tests indicated they ha...

Weight-loss surgery is associated with a significantly lower risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and death, a new study reveals.

The study included more than 7,400 severely obese people, average age 36, in Denmark who had not suffered a heart attack or stroke. Half of the participants had weight-loss ("bariatric") surgery and half did not (the "control" group).

Over ...

There's been a sharp increase in high blood pressure-related deaths in the United States, particularly in rural areas, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 10 million U.S. deaths between 2007 and 2017 and found that death rates linked to high blood pressure (hypertension) rose 72% in rural areas and 20% in urban areas.

The increase was highest in ...

E-cigarette use is rising, putting more Americans at risk of blood vessel damage and heart disease, according to three new studies.

In the first study, researchers found that nearly 1 in 20 adults use e-cigarettes.

"Our study may have important public health implications and ramifications for educational strategies aimed at targeting various population segments to inform t...

If you're at high risk for heart disease, lowering your blood pressure below the standard target level may help extend your life, a new study suggests.

Specifically, a systolic blood pressure target of less than 120 mm Hg -- rather than the standard 140 mm Hg -- could give someone an extra six months to three years of life, depending on their age when they begin intensive blood pressu...

How your blood flows through your heart may depend on whether you are a man or a woman, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers used a sophisticated imaging technique called 4D flow MRI to examine blood flow and to assess how it influences cardiac performance.

Scans of the heart's main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, were analyzed from 20 men and 19 women.

...

In a sign that suggests America's obesity epidemic is far from under control, a new government report shows that more than 40% of people in the United States are obese.

And almost 1 in 10 is severely obese, the researchers added.

"Over the time period from 1999 to 2018, the obesity prevalence increased about 12% -- from 30.5% of Americans to 42.4% of America...

It's a dangerous equation: Poor sleep triggers a bad diet, and the two can equal a higher risk for obesity and heart disease in women, a new study contends.

"Women are particularly prone to sleep disturbances across the life span, because they often shoulder the responsibilities of caring for children and family and, later, because of menopausal hormones," said study senior author Bro...

Having high blood pressure in a first pregnancy quadruples a woman's risk of heart attack or death from heart disease, a new study finds.

About 2% to 8% of pregnant women with previously normal blood pressure develop a condition called preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

In this study, Rutgers University ...

Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it's the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say.

Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, according to a study published Feb. 17 in the journal Circulation.

"One woman dies from cardiovascular disease...

More than two-thirds of Americans don't know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, a new survey reveals.

Overall, 68% of respondents weren't aware that heart disease is the top killer of women, but the rate was much higher (80%) among millennials.

A large number of respondents mistakenly believed breast cancer is the main cause of death i...

After a weekend of football-shaped pigs-in-a-blanket, you probably don't want to hear that the latest study on red and processed meat found that these foods boost your risk of heart and blood vessel disease.

The study also found that meat ups your risk of premature death.

"Consume red and processed meats in moderation because even two servings or more a week are associated...

Since the 1970s, serious heart disease among childhood cancer survivors had declined remarkably, a new study finds.

The decline suggests that efforts to make cancer treatments, including radiation, less toxic are paying off, researchers say.

For the study, researchers led by Dr. Daniel Mulrooney, from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., collected data ...

Popular media often portrays heart disease as a man's problem, but new research suggests that women's blood vessels actually age faster than men's do.

The new study found that blood pressure started increasing in women as early as the third decade of life, and it continued to rise higher than blood pressure in men throughout the life span.

The researchers said that this...

Heart disease may increase your odds for kidney failure, a new study finds.

"Individuals with a history of cardiovascular disease should be recognized as a high-risk population for kidney failure," said study leader Dr. Junichi Ishigami, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

"Physicians should be aware of cardiovascular disease as an important ris...

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday gave expanded approval to a prescription form of fish oil called Vascepa, to help prevent heart trouble in people at high risk who are already taking statins.

Vascepa (icosapent ethyl) was already FDA-approved for a small percentage of patients with exceptionally high blood levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat.

The new ...

Secondhand smoke can harm children's arteries, a new study warns.

Researchers used ultrasound to examine the carotid artery in the neck, brachial artery in the upper arm, and abdominal aorta right above the belly button in 298 kids aged 8 to 18 who were not smokers.

Some had been exposed to secondhand smoke and others had not, the study authors said.

The investiga...

Though weight-loss surgery can do wonders for your waistline, a new study suggests it might also reverse subtle damage to your heart.

The research included 38 obese patients who had weight-loss surgery and 19 obese patients who were on the waiting list for weight-loss surgery.

At the start of the study, 58% of patients in the surgery group had subclinical heart disease -...

Many patients who have an artery-opening procedure don't understand or remember information they receive before their surgery, and most have unrealistic expectations about what it will do for them, a new study finds.

Researchers examined the effectiveness of informed consent -- which is meant to provide the risks and benefits of a procedure -- given to a group of patients before they ...

A doctor armed with your Apple Watch might be able to tell if you're suffering from a heart attack, researchers report.

A physician should be able to gather enough heart rhythm data by placing the watch's sensors on different parts of your body, to judge whether a person is in the middle of a heart attack, the study found.

"Any Apple Watch series 4 and 5 can be used," said r...

Prescription-strength fish oil slows the development of artery-clogging plaques, according to early results from an ongoing clinical trial.

Icosapent ethyl, sold under the brand name Vascepa, is a drug derived from fish that contains pure EPA, a key nutrient in fish oil. In the new study, Vascepa appeared to put the brakes on key aspects of plaque formation in vessels after nine month...

Diabetes might be more deadly for women than men, at least when it comes to heart troubles, new research shows.

Heart disease occurs an average of 15 years earlier in people with diabetes, and is their main cause of illness and death. In women, the connection between diabetes and heart disease is particularly strong.

Worldwide, more women die due to diabetes than men, 2.1 mi...

It seems like a no brainer: The flu shot protects heart patients from illness and death, so getting one should be the first thing they do every year before the season starts.

But new research shows that a third of these vulnerable patients don't get vaccinated.

"Patients need to be educated about the benefits of the flu vaccination," said study lead author Dr. Gowtham Grand...

When children with genetically high cholesterol are prescribed statins, it can drastically cut their risk of heart disease and death before the age of 40, a new study finds.

At issue is a condition called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an inherited genetic disorder that causes levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol to soar. It begins at birth, and people with FH have a high risk of deve...

Chemotherapy can be hard on the heart, but an individualized exercise program may mitigate some of that damage, new research suggests.

Heart problems are a common side effect in patients with cancer because cancer treatments can impair heart function and structure or accelerate development of heart disease, especially when patients have risk factors such as high blood pressure, accor...

Scientists are taking the wrappings off an age-old malady.

Clogged arteries are a heart problem that's dogged humanity for millennia, finds a new imaging study of mummies.

Mummified arterial tissue shows evidence of cholesterol plaque buildup in people who lived anywhere from 2000 BC to 1000 AD, said lead researcher Dr. Mohammad Madjid.

These weren't just bigwigs ...

If you are older and you have heart disease, you might think you should take it easy. But new research suggests the opposite is true.

Exercise is especially beneficial for patients who have a physical impairment, the study authors found.

"Aging is associated with several factors such as increased inflammation or oxidative stress that predispose people to cardiovascular disea...

A new study proves that the old adage "use it or lose it" is definitely true when it comes to fitness.

After just two weeks of sedentary behavior, formerly fit people had:

  • A decline in heart and lung health
  • Increased waist circumference
  • Greater body fat and liver fat
  • Higher levels of insulin resistance

"The study showed th...

Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease -- a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

The British researchers found that in heart disease patients who are obese, body fat surrounding the arteries tends to secrete high amounts of a protein called WNT5A. The protein, in turn, appears to have "tox...

Could popping just one pill a day keep your heart and blood vessels humming along for years to come?

Possibly. Researchers just tested a combo pill containing low doses of two blood pressure medications, a statin and a medication that keeps you from retaining excess fluid. They estimated that taking the polypill over a year reduced the risk of heart disease and blood vessel disease b...

Heart attack patients often take longer to seek help if they have gradual symptoms, which may put them at increased risk of death, researchers say.

Gradual symptoms begin with mild discomfort that slowly worsens, while abrupt symptoms are sudden and severe pain, according to authors of a study published Sept. 12 in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.

"Both...

Small, lasting changes in cholesterol and blood pressure levels can dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes over a lifetime, new research suggests.

The large study found that a combination of a drop in LDL cholesterol (the bad type) of 14 mg/dL and a 5 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) cut the lifetime risk of heart di...

As Hurricane Dorian rolls up the southeastern coast of the United States, most in its path worry about having enough water, food and batteries to ride the storm out.

But the American Heart Association (AHA) warns that the high stress and trauma of such an event can also trigger heart trouble, especially among heart disease and stroke patients.

The hurricane is forecast to h...

An unhealthy lifestyle is a bigger contributor to heart disease than genetics for many younger adults, according to a new study.

The findings show that good health habits should be a key part of prevention efforts, even in people with a family history of early heart disease, researchers said.

The study included 1,075 people under age 50. Of those,...

Opening all of a person's clogged arteries after a heart attack can protect their health better than reopening only the one that caused it, a major international clinical trial has concluded.

Opening all blockages and not just the "culprit" behind the attack reduces a patient's risk of dying or having another heart attack by 26%, researchers reported Se...

Rising obesity rates, coupled with an associated jump in diabetes and high blood pressure cases, appears to be undoing decades of gains made against heart disease, a new study finds.

After 2010, the rate of deaths from heart disease continued to drop, but more slowly. Deaths from stroke leveled off, and deaths from high blood pressure ("hypertension") increased, researchers report.

The treatments that childhood cancer patients receive often save their lives, but they also make survivors prone to heart troubles, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined heart disease rates in nearly 7,300 childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed at an average age of 7) and a "control group" of more than 36,000 people without cancer in the province of Ontario, Canada.

Imagine a single pill loaded with a battery of heart medications that you take once a day to cut your chances of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

A new clinical trial has turned that idea into reality.

The "polypill" reduced the risk of life-threatening heart health problems by more than one-third during a five-year period in a group of more than 3,400 people aged 50 ...

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