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Health News Results - 326

Overall use of insulin pumps among U.S. youngsters with type 1 diabetes has climbed in recent decades, but those who are poor or from minority groups are less likely to have the devices, a new study finds.

Insulin pumps, which do away with the need for numerous painful injections, have been shown to ...

A form of diabetes caused by malnutrition is significantly different from type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be considered a distinct form of the disease, a new study says.

The findings may prove crucial in developing effective treatme...

If you're poor and have a severe type of heart attack, the chance you'll live through it is significantly lower than that of someone with more money, new research shows.

The finding underscores the need to close a divide in health care that hits low-income people hard, said lead researcher Dr. Abdul...

Long-distance travel will likely prove a nearly insurmountable barrier to some women seeking abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned as expected, a new study concludes.

Women who need an abortion are more than twice as likely to delay the procedure or decide to continue their pregnancy if they live 50 or more miles from a clinic, compared with women who live within 5 miles of a clinic,

Young adults who struggle to afford food face an increased risk of diabetes later in life, possibly due to the long-term effects of eating cheaper, less nutritious food.

That's the conclusion of researchers who analyz...

If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

"If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better environment for the treatment to be effective than if you're going to a poor neighborhood with other problems," said stu...

U.S. cancer survivors under age 65 with medical-related financial struggles have an increased risk of early death, a new study finds.

"Our findings show the need to address financ...

In yet another sign that climate change strikes the poorest without mercy, a new study shows that low-income people have a 40% higher exposure to heat than those with higher incomes.

By the end of the century, heat wave exposure for the poorest 25% people worldwide will equal the rest of the global population combined. That's after ...

Hospitalizations for dangerously high blood pressure more than doubled in the United States from 2002 to 2014, new research shows.

This jump in hospitalizations for what's called a "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 1, 2022
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  • U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

    Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the verge of critical staffing shortages, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA). In 12 states, 40% or more of ...

    Homelessness is difficult enough, but when it's compounded by serious mental health issues the result can be an inability to function at even the most basic level.

    Sometimes that leads to round-the-clock involuntary hospitalization, and when that happens a state-appointed psychiatric conservator can take over, making critical health care decisions for a person deemed mentally unstable.

    The chance of someone who is covered by Medicaid surviving cancer may depend in part on where they live, a new analysis finds.

    In states that had lower Medicaid income eligibility limits, cancer survival rates were worse for cancers both in early and late stages compared to states with higher Medicaid income eligibility limits, Amer...

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • When a sick child spends time in the intensive care unit, the impact lasts even after the hospital stay is over.

    Added to it are days, weeks, sometimes months out of school for the young patient and extended work absences for their primary caregivers.

    "Pediatric critical illness impacts a family’s health and well-being not only during the child’s treatment but after they leave ...

    Economic status appears linked to increased risk of being born with a cleft palate or lip, new research suggests, building on past evidence that it can also result in delayed care and poorer outcomes.

    Cleft palate and cleft lip are the terms that describe openings or split...

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...

    Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 -- deaths that are considered "premature."

    The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    Many parents want to make the holiday season magical for their kids, but for some the stress they feel trying to live up to that ideal may actually be doing the opposite.

    A poll from Michigan Medicine found that about 1 in 5 parents said their ...

    While strokes and related deaths have declined in rich nations, they remain stubbornly high worldwide, a new study says.

    Author Liyuan Han attributed the overall decreases to "better medical services in high-income countries, which may offer earlier detection of stroke risk factors and better control" of them.

    “But even in these countries, the total number of people with

  • Robert Preidt
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • "Medicare For All" gets tossed around a lot by advocates of universal health coverage, but a new study finds that today's Medicare is far from free for seniors and people with disabilities.

    Instead, a large number of beneficiaries are sliding into medical debt and delaying needed health care due to financial holes in the system, according to findings published online Dec. 10 in

    Here's a social distancing strategy that really worked in the early days of the pandemic: New research shows that providing hotel rooms to homeless people at high risk for severe COVID-19 significantly lowered their chance of infection.

    In early April 2020, the city of Chicago made 200 rooms at a hotel available to homeless people in shelters who were considered at high risk because they ...

    Is air pollution a bigger health threat to minorities?

    Apparently so, claims a new U.S. study that finds while air pollution levels have fallen in recent decades, people of color still have more exposure to dirty air than white Americans do.

    Air pollution is linked to a range of heal...

    Stress about the COVID-19 pandemic may be eclipsing holiday joy for many older Americans, a new poll reveals.

    About half (47%) of 50- to 80-year-olds polled reported a mixed experience of joy and stress.

    One in five said they feel a lot of stress, while 38% said ...

    Poor neighborhoods of color bore the brunt of a surge in violent crime in U.S. cities early in the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    "This study adds to the mounting body of research showing that equal opportunities -- including the opportunity to live, work, learn, play and worship free from...

    They take care of others, but many U.S. home health care workers say they're not in good shape themselves, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed self-reported data collected from nearly 3,000 home health care workers in 38 states between 2014 and 2018 and found that more than a quarter rated their general health as fair or poor, 1 in 5 reported poor mental health, and 14% reported poor ...

    President Joe Biden promised cheaper prescription drugs for all Americans on Monday as his social agenda legislation winds its way through Congress.

    Biden tried to shift Americans' focus to pocketbook provisions overlooked in his $2 trillion legislation, which deals with everything from climate to family life and taxes. The legislation has passed the House and is pending before the Senate...

    Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

    Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

    Quitting smoking is especially important during pregnancy, and now a new study suggests that when it comes to kicking the habit, cash may be just the incentive some women need.

    The study results suggest progressive financial rewards for smoking abstinence "could be implemented in the routine health care of pregnant smokers," the French researchers said. Dr. Ivan Berlin of Hôpital Pitié-...

    With HIV a continuing threat to women's health, the World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the first long-acting device to protect women from sexually transmitted HIV.

    The device is a vaginal ring made of silicone elastomer, a flexible rubber-like material that makes it easy to insert and comfortable to use. The ring releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine into the vagina slowly...

    Besides its terrible impact on mental health, postpartum depression can also bring long-term financial struggles to affected women, new research shows.

    "These findings highlight the importance of screening and expanding access to mental health support services for low-income pregnant and postpartum women," said study author Slawa Rokicki, an instructor at Rutgers School of Public Health i...

    Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

    The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

    "These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

    Neurologists must make sure Alzheimer's patients and their families understand that the controversial drug aducanumab does not restore mental function, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) said in new position statement that includes ethical guidelines.

    "Aducanumab is not a cure for Alzheimer's disease, yet since it has been approved by the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration], patients...

    Race-based gaps in health care and health outcomes persist in every region of the United States, a new state-by-state report card shows.

    Racial and ethnic disparities woven throughout America and its system of health care mean that people of color are more likely to die younger from preventable illnesses than white people, according to a racial equity scorecard developed by The Commonweal...

    Pfizer Inc. announced Tuesday that it has reached an agreement for its promising COVID-19 antiviral pill to be made and sold cheaply in 95 developing nations.

    The countries included in the licensing deal are mostly in Africa and Asia, and they account for more than half of the world's population, the company said in a

  • Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
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  • November 16, 2021
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  • A new and expensive Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm is responsible for about half of the $21.60 increase in monthly premiums for Medicare's Part B outpatient program in 2022, Medicare officials report.

    The new premium will be $170.10 a month, and the $21.60 boost is the biggest increase ever in dollar amount, but not in percentage terms. As recently as August, a smaller increase of $10 fr...

    Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

    "During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagues to get referrals than it was for me, and the patients they were referred were more likely to need surgery," said seni...

    A growing number of American adults say they have a physical or mental disability, a new study finds.

    Of more than 400,000 adults who responded to a 2019 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, 27% reported a disability. That's a 1% increase since 2016, and represents about 67 million Americans, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University who analyzed the data.

    A measure designed to lower prescription drug costs for seniors has been added to President Joe Biden's social safety net and climate change bill that Democratic leaders hope to bring to a House vote this week.

    For the first time, the measure would enable the federal government to negotiate prices for medications covered by Medicare, The New York Times reported.

    Under the proposal, ...

    Women are as competitive and as willing to take risks as men when it comes to advancing in the workplace, according to a new study on the gender pay gap in the United States.

    "If we're finally going to close the gender pay gap, then we have to understand the sources of it -- and also solutions and remedies for it," said study co-author Mary Rigdon, associate director of the Center for the...

    A new rule to sharply cut methane emissions and other oil and gas industry air pollutants that harm health and contribute to climate change is in the works.

    The new Clean Air Act rule proposed Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would cut 41 million tons of methane emissions between 2023 and 2035.

    That's the equivalent of 920 million metric tons of carbon dioxi...

    The joys of motherhood may be overshadowed in the United States since as many as 50% of new or expectant moms can't pay their bills, including health care bills, new research suggests.

    "Financial hardship is highly prevalent among pregnant and postpartum women," said study co-author Dr. Michelle Moniz. She is an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michiga...

    Living near a fast-food restaurant may provide a quick fix if you're famished and pressed for time, but it may boost your odds for type 2 diabetes, a large study of U.S veterans suggests.

    Neighborhoods with more supermarkets, however, may protect you against developing diabetes, especially in suburban and rural areas, the researchers said.

    "The food availability choices in your envi...

    Can offering small cash cards, say for $25, be the difference between someone choosing to get their COVID-19 vaccine or waiting?

    Yes, according to a study in North Carolina that offered $25 cash cards to people who got vaccines last spring at sites in four participating counties.

    About 9% of those surveyed after getting their vaccines said that they would not have come to get vaccin...

    Gun violence sky-rocketed by more than 30% across the United States during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Almost 39,000 injuries and deaths nationwide involved a gun in the year starting in February 2019 -- and that number shot up to more than 51,000 between March 2020 and March 2021, according to natio...

    Just a few hours a week of moderate exercise may reduce your risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

    If Americans got the recommended five hours a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, more than 46,000 cancer cases could be prevented in the United States each year, according to the report.

    The study authors said that 3% of all cancer cases in U.S. adults aged 30 and older from...

    U.S. cancer patients in poor and rural areas are more likely to die by suicide than those in affluent, urban areas, a new study finds.

    "People who have received a cancer diagnosis are faced with a number of challenges, such as accessing reliable and affordable care, that can add to existing anxiety or depression associated with their illness," said lead author Ryan Suk. "But those who liv...

    As COVID-19 has surged throughout the United States for the past year and a half, some may have picked up an old bad habit or started a new one.

    How do researchers know this? They discovered that cigarette sales jumped during the first 15 months of the pandemic, exceeding their own estimates by 14%.

    It's not entirely clear whether that's because current smokers are smoking more, for...

    People who live in disadvantaged parts of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die young from heart disease as folks in the wealthiest locales, a new study reports.

    In other words, your zip code can tell you as much or more about your heart health risk as your genetic code, said senior researcher Dr. Khurram Nasir, chief of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at Houston Meth...

    Pop singer Britney Spears was at the height of her fame in 2008 when, through a series of arcane legal maneuverings, her father gained conservatorship over her and took control of her personal and financial affairs.

    Spears' plight and the #FreeBritney movement has shone a bright spotlight on America's guardianship system, which experts say is shrouded in secrecy, ripe for abuse and in des...