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Facebook and Instagram have started taking down posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to get them after the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade.

These posts told women how to get

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • A new study warns that the social media giant TikTok is filled with confusing and wrong information about the heart-healthy, plant-based approach to eating dubbed the Mediterranean diet.

    For the study, researchers analyzed 200 videos posted to the platform last August. They were the first to pop up on a search for content tagged #mediterraneandiet. By definition, that tag, or label, sugge...

    WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- As a bill that would expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services makes its way through the U.S. Senate, a new study of people with advanced cancer suggests the practice could improve the lives of patients.

    The use of telehealth s...

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • About one-third of cancer nutrition information on the social media site Pinterest is misleading and posted by businesses trying to sell products, according to a new study.

    "Our results revealed a significant amount of misinformation about cancer and nutrition," said study co-author Tracy Crane, an assoc...

    In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

    But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

    Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.

    In experiments with workers in several countries, researchers found two broad phenomenon: Coworkers te...

    Preschoolers can learn reading skills in a virtual classroom, University of Washington researchers say.

    "Children are ready to learn to read at the age of 5. But the pandemic robbed children of the opportunity for in-person reading instruction," said Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS), in Seattle. "What we've shown here is that an online re...

    A handful of "locked-in" amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients can now work a laptop computer using their brain waves, thanks to an implant lodged in a major vein inside their skull.

    The implant — a stent lined with 16 miniscule electrodes — is nestled in a vein located near the motor cortex of comp...

    FRIDAY, March 11, 2022 -- Sick people seeking lifesaving care in the United States could fall victim to a hidden part of Russia's war on Ukraine -- vicious cyberattacks aimed at sowing disruption, confusion and chaos as ground forces advance.

    Cybersecurity experts warn that attacks launched against Ukrainian institutions have the potential to spill over into America's health care systems,...

    Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    Telemedicine was widely used by Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the pandemic, and many were happy with the results, a new study finds.

    "The findings suggest that telehealth services were well liked during the pandemic. Because many individuals with MS have physical disability that may make travel more difficult, tempo...

    Misinformation about COVID-19 abounds, and cancer patients who are currently receiving treatment are more likely to believe COVID lies than cancer survivors who've completed treatment and people who've never had cancer, a new study says.

    The findings are from a survey of nearly 900 U.S. adults about evenly divided into the three groups.

    "These findings help us better understand the ...

    You have almost certainly seen the pleas while scrolling through social media: Called crowdfunding, folks try to raise money to pay for their sick loved one's mounting medical bills.

    But new research shows these grassroots campaigns rarely raise enough money to make a difference.

    According to GoFundMe, which corner...

    MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay Now) -- Alaina Stanisci has grappled with an eating disorder since she was 10, and the disruptions of the pandemic only made things worse for the high school senior.

    "I actually experienced a relapse at the beginning of the pandemic because of this lack of structure," Stanisci, 18, of Mountain Lakes, N.J., said during a HealthDay Now interview. "D...

    Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

    Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

    "Prolonged TV viewing, which involves immobilization, may increase the risk of venous thromboembolism,...

    Online grocery shopping has skyrocketed during the pandemic, but many websites are making it hard to find nutrition information on products, a new study shows.

    In the United States, packaged foods are required to have a nutrition facts label, ingredients list and w...

    Images of people eating and drinking are a staple of social media, but new research finds such posts from celebrities often puts the spotlight squarely on junk food.

    Profit isn't always the reason why, investigators found: Celebrities often highlight unhealthy food favorites without getting paid for it.

    "Ninety-five percent of photos that contain foods and beverages on celebrities' ...

    The pandemic has made Zoom meetings a daily reality for millions. For many, having to watch their own face in a meeting is the worst part.

    But that's not true for everyone, new research shows.

    "Most people believe that seeing yourself during virtual meetings contributes to making the overall experience worse, but that's not what showed up in my data," said study author Kristine Kuh...

    Chatting with your doctor via video about your health issues works just as well as an in-person office visit, at least when it comes to managing chronic illnesses, a new review suggests.

    Replacing office visits with video checkups delivered results that were just as effective for patients being treated for conditions like diabetes, respiratory illnesses, chronic pain, heart problems and n...

    Parents, think you have a good handle on how much time your teens are spending on social media?

    Don't bet on it. New research suggests your best guesstimate is likely way off.

    Parents significantly underestimated their teens' social media use -- especially girls' -- during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the study showed.

    "Although most parents and their teens spent...

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    Children and teens who use livestreaming gaming platforms may be bombarded with influencer-endorsed ads for energy drinks, junk food and alcohol, new research shows.

    "This type of marketing can normalize high-fat, high-sugar and high-sodium foods at a time in young viewers' live...

    People with depression symptoms might find some help from online programs or smartphone apps -- but the human component remains key, a new research review suggests.

    Not everyone with depression can readily get to face-to-face therapy -- whether due to time, distance, money or stigma. But smartphones are n...

    The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

    And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

    In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half -- 51% -- believed girls are less...

    The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand.

    "The relationship between social media and mental health has been the subject of a lot of debate," said Dr. Roy Perlis, lead author of the new study. He's director of the Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston....

    A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

    Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

    American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

    "It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor of counseling and human development services ...

    Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

    The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

    As teens dramatically stepped up their screen time during COVID-19 lockdowns, their well-being took a hit, a new study reveals.

    Recreational screen time among U.S. teens doubled from before the pandemic to nearly eight hours per day during the pandemic, according to the report. And this estimate doesn't include time spent on screens for remote learning or schoolwork, so the total was like...

    Doctors who discuss COVID-19 in the media frequently face abuse and harassment, including threats of death or violence, a new report reveals.

    More than two-thirds of experts surveyed have experienced trolling or personal attacks after speaking about COVID-19 in media interviews, a worldwide survey of more than 300 scientists found.

    Further, a quarter said such harassment is a freque...

    The coronavirus pandemic forced a significant shift to telemedicine treatment for addiction, but it's not clear whether that approach is better than in-person care, a new study finds.

    Before the pandemic, addiction treatment services in the United States had many restrictions on telemedicine use, so only about 27% of addiction facilities offered telehealth services, while telehealth was u...

    Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

    "Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

    In a health emergency, social media giants like Facebook can be both quagmires of misinformation and sources of social support and reliable guidance, a small, new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed 32 Facebook users weekly for eight weeks. All were asked about their online experiences during March and April 2020, when COVID-triggered lockdowns unfolded.

    The Facebook users -- ...

    Whether you're a kid or a college student, you'll learn more with interactive activities, discussions, movement and even AI-enhanced technologies than you will just sitting still and listening, a new study suggests.

    Learning methods that work best are hands-on, as well as what the researchers called "minds-on" and "hearts-on," using emotional and social support, the findings showed.

    Help in retaining mental function when you age could be only a few keystrokes away.

    While crosswords and exercise are often touted as ways to retain thinking skills, U.K. investigators found that the internet may also help seniors stay sharp in retirement.

    Those who used the internet more after their careers ended had substantially higher scores on cognitive, or thinking, tests, acc...

    After a heart attack, a smartwatch app may help keep patients from being hospitalized again, researchers say.

    The app helps patients keep track of medications and make lifestyle changes. It may also reduce rehospitalization in the month after discharge by half, according to a new report.

    The American Heart Association says one in six heart attack patients returns to the hospital wit...

    After routine surgery, a "virtual" follow-up visit might be just as good as a traditional office appointment, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that surgery patients who had video follow-up appointments were just as satisfied with their care as those who made a trip to the office. And they appreciated the convenience of skipping the commute and the doctor's waiting room.

    The p...

    The White House has reached out to rapper Nicki Minaj over her concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine, which she said had caused swollen testicles in a friend of her cousin in Trinidad.

    A White House official said Minaj was offered a call with a doctor to address her questions about the vaccine, after her message went viral on Twitter, various outlets report.

    Minaj said

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 16, 2021
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  • If you feel exhausted after a day filled with online meetings, well, you are not imagining it.

    A new study found that the pressure of having the camera on for a long time is draining. This so-called "Zoom fatigue" is even worse if you're a woman or a new employee.

    "There's always this assumption that if you have your camera on during meetings, you are going to be more engaged," said...

    Despite all of the criticism of online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests there was a silver lining: more shut-eye for middle and high school students.

    "Without the required transportation time or time required to get ready for school in the morning, online students were able to wake later, and thus get more sleep," said lead author Lisa Meltzer. She is a pediatr...

    You've heard the warnings about kids who are forever glued to their screens, but all that screen time can have devastating health effects for grown-ups.

    If you're under 60, too much time using a computer, watching TV or reading could boost your risk for a stroke, Canadian researchers warn.

    "Be aware that very high sedentary time with little time spent on physical activity can have a...

    Want to see a temperamental tween or teen act happier?

    The formula is simple, a large international study suggests.

    "Screen time should be replaced by 'green time' for optimizing the well-being of our kids," said study author Asad Khan, an associate professor in biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

    That advice stems from survey...

    Rewards such as "likes" and "shares" fuel expressions of moral outrage on social media because they reward people who post such messages, a new study suggests.

    "Social media's incentives are changing the tone of our political conversations online," said first author William Brady, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. "This is the first evidence th...

    Telemedicine may fall short when it comes to people with voice and speech disorders, researchers report.

    There was a significant rise in telemedicine use -- health visits using computer, tablet or smartphone video conferencing -- during the COVID-19 pandemic. And even though the pandemic "appears to be waning, telepractice popularity is here to stay," said Cara Stepp, an associate profess...

    Americans who get their COVID-19 news and information solely from Facebook have much lower vaccination rates than the general population.

    That's the takeaway from a new survey of nearly 20,700 people across the United States. The researchers asked them in June which of six sources they use for COVID-19 news and info. The six included: Facebook, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, the Biden administrati...

    Don't believe everything you read on social media about cancer and cancer treatment.

    A new study finds that one-third of the most popular articles on social media about treatment for common cancers contains misinformation -- and most of it can be downright dangerous.

    "The worst-case scenario is when it leads to a person declining proven cancer treatments in favor of a treatment tha...

    Watch videos on TikTok and you're likely to see plenty of positive portrayals of vaping, a new study shows.

    And that's a problem, according to researchers, who call for tighter regulation of the platform popular with kids and teens.

    "Viewing other young people, friends, acquaintances or influencers vaping in fun and entertaining contexts, is likely to normalize e-cigarette use and m...

    Is it possible to become addicted to gaming on the internet?

    Yes, warns new research that discovered when young people get too hooked it may trigger sleep difficulties, depression, anxiety and, in some cases, even suicidal thoughts.

    Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and 2015 revealed that roughly one in 20 had "internet gaming disor...