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Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.

In experiments with workers in several countries, researchers found two broad phenomenon: Coworkers te...

Artificial intelligence (AI) may be able to identify alcoholics at risk of relapsing after treatment, researchers say.

Patients often return to heavy drinking during and after treatment, and may require multiple tries before they can achieve long-term abstinence from

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2022
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  • A new artificial intelligence approach can predict if and when heart patients might die of sudden cardiac arrest far more accurately than a doctor can, and could improve survival rates, according to its developers.

    "Sudden cardiac death caused by

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 11, 2022
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  • Full Page
  • FRIDAY, March 11, 2022 -- Sick people seeking lifesaving care in the United States could fall victim to a hidden part of Russia's war on Ukraine -- vicious cyberattacks aimed at sowing disruption, confusion and chaos as ground forces advance.

    Cybersecurity experts warn that attacks launched against Ukrainian institutions have the potential to spill over into America's health care systems,...

    It's crucial to keep preschoolers away from screens and other sources of light in the hour before bedtime if you want them to get a good night's sleep, researchers say.

    That's because even a little bit of light exposure can trigger a sharp drop in the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin, according...

    A robot performed challenging keyhole surgery on pigs without any human help in what could be a major step toward fully automated surgery on people.

    "Our findings show that we can automate one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in surgery: the reconnection of two ends of an intestine," said senior study author Axel Krieger. He is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at J...

    The pandemic has made Zoom meetings a daily reality for millions. For many, having to watch their own face in a meeting is the worst part.

    But that's not true for everyone, new research shows.

    "Most people believe that seeing yourself during virtual meetings contributes to making the overall experience worse, but that's not what showed up in my data," said study author Kristine Kuh...

    Chatting with your doctor via video about your health issues works just as well as an in-person office visit, at least when it comes to managing chronic illnesses, a new review suggests.

    Replacing office visits with video checkups delivered results that were just as effective for patients being treated for conditions like diabetes, respiratory illnesses, chronic pain, heart problems and n...

    Children and teens who use livestreaming gaming platforms may be bombarded with influencer-endorsed ads for energy drinks, junk food and alcohol, new research shows.

    "This type of marketing can normalize high-fat, high-sugar and high-sodium foods at a time in young viewers' live...

    The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

    And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

    In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half -- 51% -- believed girls are less...

    Call it the great pandemic sit-down.

    As COVID-19 turned daily commutes into shuffles between rooms at home, and Netflix replaced time spent at the gym or playing sports, Americans have been sitting a lot more. Now a new study suggests it may be putting their mental health at risk.

    "We knew COVID was going to affect our behavior and what we could do in lots of weird, funky ways that ...

    Modern Americans get much less physical activity than their forebearers did 200 years ago, and increasing reliance on technology is a major reason why.

    That's the finding from researchers who used data on falling body temperature and changing metabolic rates in the United States to measure de...

    Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

    "Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

    In a health emergency, social media giants like Facebook can be both quagmires of misinformation and sources of social support and reliable guidance, a small, new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed 32 Facebook users weekly for eight weeks. All were asked about their online experiences during March and April 2020, when COVID-triggered lockdowns unfolded.

    The Facebook users -- ...

    Whether you're a kid or a college student, you'll learn more with interactive activities, discussions, movement and even AI-enhanced technologies than you will just sitting still and listening, a new study suggests.

    Learning methods that work best are hands-on, as well as what the researchers called "minds-on" and "hearts-on," using emotional and social support, the findings showed.

    Artificial intelligence (AI) might be able to spot the next virus to jump from animals to humans, Scottish researchers report.

    Identifying diseases before they become a threat to humans is challenging, because only a few of the nearly 2 million animal viruses can infect humans. By developing machine learning models, researchers can analyze genetic patterns of viruses that might infect peo...

    An artificial intelligence tool could help radiologists spot breast cancer on ultrasound images and reduce the need for extra testing, new research suggests.

    "Our study demonstrates how artificial intelligence can help radiologists reading breast ultrasound exams to reveal only those that show real signs of breast cancer, and to avoid verification by biopsy in cases that turn out to be be...

    Radiologists still outperform artificial intelligence (AI) when it comes to breast cancer screening, a new paper shows.

    Many countries have mammography screening programs to detect and treat breast cancer early. However, examining mammograms for early signs of cancer means a lot of repetitive work for radiologists, which can result in some cancers being missed, the authors explained.

    <...

    Take a work break: A small, new study suggests that getting out of your chair every half hour may help improve your blood sugar levels and your overall health.

    Every hour spent sitting or lying down increases the risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, the study authors said. But moving around during those sedentary hours is an easy way to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce t...

    Want to see a temperamental tween or teen act happier?

    The formula is simple, a large international study suggests.

    "Screen time should be replaced by 'green time' for optimizing the well-being of our kids," said study author Asad Khan, an associate professor in biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

    That advice stems from survey...

    Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

    The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

    Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their daily...

    Many Americans have used telehealth and would turn to it for mental health care, a new online poll shows.

    Conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) from March 26 to April 5, the poll found that 38% had used telehealth to consult with a health professional, up from 31% last fall.

    In all, 82% have used it since the start of the pandemic, the poll found. Most consultati...

    Is too much screen time turning kids off of books?

    New research suggests that's so: Toddlers who regularly spent time on electronic devices -- including tablets, smartphones and TVs -- were less likely to read print books with their parents at age 3. That, in turn, translated to even more screen use by age 5.

    The findings do not prove definitively that early exposure to electronic d...

    A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

    The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

    Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their ...

    Preschoolers who spend a lot of time watching movies and shows on TVs and other screens are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems by age 5, a Finnish study warns.

    But despite their reputation, video games did not appear to promote any emotional problems in youngsters, researchers concluded.

    "We found that high levels of screen time at the age of 1.5 years is relat...

    One in four U.S. households use smart speakers to check the weather, play music and query search engines. But a new technology may soon have folks asking, "Hey Google, how's my heart?"

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, have developed a skill for Amazon Alexa and Google Home that allows the devices to check heart rhythms.

    Like a bat using echolocation to hunt fo...

    You've had a stroke and arrive at a hospital, but the stroke specialist is off-duty. Never fear: Telemedicine may help save your life.

    Especially during the COVID-19 crisis, so-called 'telestroke' services -- where health workers use video to consult with a stroke specialist who could be miles away -- is helping to lead to better patient outcomes, new research shows.

    "Our findings p...

    Telemedicine rapidly expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic as people turned to their phones and computers rather than leave their homes for health care.

    But some groups of people were left behind in the telemedicine boom, a new study reports.

    Middle-aged and older folks are much less likely to complete their scheduled telemedicine visits, as well as Medicaid recipients and those who...

    Adults living with kidney failure are receptive to using mobile devices to help with their care, according to a new study.

    Mobile health can provide many benefits for patients, especially for those whose care is complicated and who have dietary restrictions, researchers said. Whether people on dialysis are ready to incorporate mobile technology in their care would be a limiting factor.

    As the COVID-19 pandemic spread throughout the United States, many people changed the way they live: As shopping, education and work shifted online, so did routine health care appointments.

    However, while telemedicine seemed to make it easy to check in with a primary care doctor, a new study suggests that wasn't the case for everyone.

    Researchers found that certain patients with con...

    Telemedicine has rapidly grown as a way to get medical care in the era of COVID-19, but a new study reveals that a doctor's evaluation by phone or video may miss crucial clues to impending health problems.

    Telemedicine visits accounted for about 35% of primary care visits between April and June -- a huge increase for what prior to 2020 had been a rather obscure mode of delivering ...

    Children who spend too much time on computers or watching TV may have poorer reading and math skills, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed school test data of more than 1,200 Australian children when they were 8 and 9 years of age and again two years later. Parents were asked about their child's use of electronic media.

    Kids who watched two or more hours of TV a day at ag...

    Since the coronavirus pandemic began, nearly 50% of Americans have used technology to communicate with their doctors, a new study finds.

    But less than one-quarter have talked with their doctors about using health information technology, the researchers found.

    "The results of our statewide survey indicate patients are using health information technology," said researche...

    Both cyberbullies and their victims can suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new British study finds.

    Cyberbullying is bullying online rather than in person. It's so pervasive that pediatricians should routinely ask their patients about it as part of psychological assessment, the researchers said.

    "Parents, teachers and health professionals need...

    Back before coronavirus took over the headlines, every week seemed to bring another report about artificial intelligence besting human doctors at everything from diagnosing skin cancer to spotting pneumonia on chest X-rays.

    But these artificial intelligence (AI) tools -- computer programs that get better at performing a task by being "trained" on the right kind of data -- are years aw...

    Preschoolers may spend more time on smartphones or tablets than their parents realize, and some use apps intended for teens and adults, researchers report.

    A new study tracked mobile device use among 350 children aged 3 to 5 over nine months and compared their findings with parents' estimates of their use.

    Preschoolers with their own smartphones or tablets averaged two hours...

    Artificial intelligence may reduce the need for glioma brain cancer patients to have biopsies to determine the best treatment for their tumors, researchers report.

    Currently, it's common to remove glioma samples from patients and analyze them to select appropriate therapy.

    But scientists have been testing imaging techniques that might be used instead of biopsies to assess gl...

    An analysis of Twitter data suggests that Americans are heeding social distancing and other safety recommendations during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers say.

    Officials have told people to limit travel, stay home and distance themselves to slow the spread of the virus.

    "The question though is how effective are these policies? Once you tell people to stay home, it doesn...

    An international team has designed a computer program that predicts with up to 80% accuracy which COVID-19 patients will develop serious respiratory disease.

    Developed by U.S. and Chinese researchers, the artificial intelligence (AI) program has been tested at two hospitals in China with 53 patients who were diagnosed in January with COVID-19. The new tool is considered experiment...

    A new study casts doubt on claims that artificial intelligence (AI) equals or surpasses the ability of human experts to interpret medical images.

    Many previous studies were of poor quality and may have exaggerated the benefits of AI, which could pose a risk to the safety of millions of patients, the study authors claimed.

    The investigators reviewed two randomized clinical tr...

    Here's a good reason to put your electronic devices down whenever you can: Experts say that using them incorrectly or too often can put you at risk for a range of injuries.

    "When people position their hand, arm or neck in uncomfortable positions for a prolonged period of time, it can lead to strains and overuse injuries," said Dr. Michael Darowish, an orthopedic surgeon at Penn State ...

    Choosing the right antidepressant for someone who is depressed can be hit or miss. But a new study shows that artificial intelligence (AI) technology may be able to help.

    Researchers input information from electrical signals in the brain into a computer program that learns as it goes. Based on brain activity, the AI technology helped predict whether or not an antidepressant will help...

    Cyberbullying can worsen symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people, new research shows.

    That's the conclusion of a recent survey of 50 teens who were inpatients at a suburban psychiatric hospital near New York City. Researchers reported that those who had been bullied had higher severity of PTSD and anger than those who were not bullied.

    "Even...

    In another step toward using artificial intelligence in medicine, a new study shows that computers can be trained to match human experts in judging the severity of prostate tumors.

    Researchers found that their artificial intelligence system was "near perfect" in determining whether prostate tissue contained cancer cells. And it was on par with 23 "world-leading" pathologists in judgin...

    Analyzing people's tweets could reveal if they're lonely, researchers say.

    Loneliness -- which has been linked with depression, heart disease, dementia and other health problems -- affects about 1 in 5 adults in the United States.

    Researchers analyzed public accounts of Twitter users in Pennsylvania and identified more than 6,200 who used words like "lonely" or "alone" more ...

    Cyber attackers who target hospital databases mostly go after patient contact and financial information, not medical records, a new study finds.

    The data that hackers seek could lead to identity theft and financial fraud, according to investigators from Michigan State University in East Lansing, and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

    Moreover, this is the focus of more ...

    Taking a vacation from social media and digital technology while you travel can cause withdrawal symptoms, but a small study suggests you'll come to enjoy the offline experience.

    The British study included 24 people. During their travels to 17 countries and regions, most unplugged from technologies such as mobile phones, laptops, tablets, social media and navigation tools for more tha...

    He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

    In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

    "It's exciting knowing what types of support we can provide kids who may feel is...

    Parents who find a sex-based text on their teenager's phone should be on the lookout for other problems in their child's life, a new evidence review suggests.

    Teens who share sexually explicit images are much more likely to be involved in other troubling activities, including unsafe sex, alcohol and drugs.

    "The kids who are sexting are engaging in a lot of other risky behaviors,...

    Dazzling graphics, engaging applications and a dizzying array of beeps, pings and rings make smartphones and other portable gadgets hard to resist. With summer vacation starting for millions of American children, many parents are asking: How much screen time is too much?

    In newly released guidelines, the World Health Organization recommends no screen time for children younger than 1....