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11 Jul

Sugary Drinks and Cancer Risk

Cutting back on soda, fruit juice and other sugary drinks may cut cancer cases.

Health News Results - 47

Sugar-sweetened drinks can play havoc with your cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which increases your risk for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

Specifically, drinking more than 12 ounces (1 standard can) of sugary sodas or fruit drinks a day may not bode well for your cardiovascular health, researchers say.

"Think before you drink. There is accumulating evi...

Chicago's brief and now-defunct soda tax did cut the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, a new study finds, along with raising funds for public health initiatives.

From August to November 2017, when the tax was in effect, the volume of soda sold in Cook County dropped 21% and the tax raised nearly $62 million, nearly $17 million of which went to a county health fund.

American youngsters are drinking far fewer sodas and other sugar-sweetened drinks and getting far fewer calories from them than they used to, a new report finds.

But kids from more-affluent homes are benefiting more from these trends than those from poorer families, the researchers said.

For example, the percentage of kids from more-affluent homes who drank at least one swee...

Bad eating habits begin at a young age in American children, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1,200 babies (aged 6 to 11 months) and toddlers (12 to 23 months) between 2011 and 2016.

They found that 61% of babies and 98% of toddlers consumed added sugars in their typical daily diet, mainly in flavored yogurt and fruit drinks.

Infa...

Grab-and-go foods are an easy option for busy lives, but if you opt for ultra-processed foods a lot, you may pick up something you don't want -- heart disease.

About 55% of Americans' daily calories come from eating ultra-processed foods, a new study found. And the more calories that came from ultra-processed foods, the worse heart health was, the findings suggested.

"...

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Teens who stay glued to screens, be it televisions or electronic devices, are not only getting less exercise -- they're more likely to down too many sugary, caffeinated drinks, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 32,400 U.S. students in grades 8 and 10. They found that more than 27% exceeded recommended sugar intake and 21% exceeded recommended c...

Drinks marketed to children often contain loads of unhealthy sugars and sweeteners, and they come in packages that deliver too-large servings, a new report finds.

None of 34 sweetened drinks aimed at the youth market meet nutrition recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to University of Connecticut researchers.

"Sweetened drinks are about two-...

There's no doubt that eating a lot of sugar isn't good for your health. What's more, sugar can trigger a chemical reaction that has you craving more and more. Just think about the last time you ate a cookie -- were you able to stop at one? Or three? Or 10?

But Harvard researcher David Ludwig says when it comes to carbs, Americans eat more refined grains and potatoes than sugar, and th...

Four of America's biggest health organizations are banding together to urge parents to better monitor the drinks their young kids sip each day.

The take-home message from the new "Healthy Drinks, Healthy Kids" guidelines: Cut down on sugary sodas, juices and the like, and favor breast milk or cow's milk for youngsters instead of trendy plant-based milks.

"As a pediatrician,...

Whether you call it soda, pop or a soft drink, a new study's findings suggest it would be better for your health to drink water instead.

The large European study found that people who have more than two sodas a day -- with or without sugar -- had a higher risk of dying over about 16 years than people who sipped the fizzy beverages less than once a month.

"We found that hig...

People are getting the message about the dangers of sugar. Nearly 70% of Americans have cut back on foods high in added sugars, according to a survey by the International Food Information Council Foundation. But there's still a long way to go.

One of the key ways to reduce your sugar intake is by drinking plain water or low- and no-calorie beverages instead of soda and flavored w...

It's long been known that sugary drinks help people pack on unwanted pounds. But new research suggests that sweetened sodas, sports drinks and even 100% fruit juice might raise your risk for some cancers.

The study couldn't prove cause and effect, but it found that drinking as little as 3 to 4 ounces of sugary drinks each day was tied to an 18% rise in overall risk for cancer...

Eight of every 10 American households buys sodas and other sugary drinks each week, adding up to 2,000 calories per household per week, new research shows.

To put that in perspective, 2,000 calories is equal to the recommended average caloric intake for an adult for an entire day.

With the obesity epidemic continuing for Americans young and old, i...

Most folks know that sugary drinks aren't healthy, but a new study finds fruit juices are not much better.

In fact, consuming them regularly may help shorten your life, researchers say.

"Older adults who drink more sugary beverages, which include fruit juice as well as sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages, may be at risk of dying earlier," said study author Jean Welsh. ...

When it comes to sugars in food, you're far better off having a bowl of blueberries than a granola bar, a nutritionist says.

Added sugars just aren't the same as natural sugars, noted Kara Shifler Bowers, a registered dietitian at Penn State PRO Wellness, a health center in Hershey, Pa.

"Natural sugars in fruit are different because fruits carry fiber as well as many antioxi...

Kids who favor diet sodas over sugary ones don't consume fewer calories over the course of a day, a new study finds.

And they average 200 more calories daily than their peers who choose water, according to the results of a survey of over 7,000 U.S. children and teens.

Experts said the findings support what's already recommended by groups like the American Heart Association:...

A new Nutrition Facts label that highlights the amount of added sugars in food could prevent nearly 1 million cases of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

The new label, first proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May 2016, adds a new line under the Total Carbohydrate category that details the amount of sugar that has been added on top of the suga...

The concerns about sugar and kids go far beyond the risk of cavities.

An extensive research review by the American Heart Association (AHA) found that kids who consume a lot of foods and drinks with added sugar could develop heart disease risk factors -- like obesity and high cholesterol -- starting in childhood.

These risks can occur with sugar intake far lower than a typic...

Two medical groups have declared war on sodas and energy drinks by calling for taxes on what has become the leading source of sugar in the diets of children and teens.

In a new joint policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Heart Association (AHA) also recommended a host of other public policies, all aimed at cutting consumption of the unhealthy drin...

Are you a sugary soda junkie? If you're ready to kick the habit, know that the answer isn't diet sodas.

Following up on research that calls the safety of these artificially sweetened drinks into question is a February study published in the journal Stroke that found for women after menopause, drinking more than one diet soda a day was associated with an increased risk for stro...

Tax it, and fewer folks will buy it.

So it goes with sugar-sweetened drinks, new research suggests.

The California city of Berkeley introduced the nation's first soda tax in 2014, and within months people were buying 21 percent fewer sugary drinks. Three years later, 52 percent fewer of these drinks were being sold while consumption of water rose 29 percent, the researche...

The term "sugar substitutes" is a catch-all that covers a wide range of alternatives, starting with those little pink, blue and yellow packets. But their value as a health or diet aid is still uncertain.

A research review in the BMJ found that there's limited evidence to say how much using them helps with weight loss, and that the real answer is to cut back on sugar in general...

Downing the wrong type of drink when you exercise could put you at risk of kidney disease, a new study warns.

Specifically, the threat is from having sugary, caffeinated soft drinks during exertion in a hot environment, according to researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York.

The small study included 12 healthy adults who did long stretches of exercise in a laborat...

Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to children," said Jennifer Emond, a member of the ...

If you think a switch from sugar to a calorie-free sweetener might help you get healthier and shed pounds, think again.

After years of research, there's still only very weak evidence that no-cal sweeteners might be beneficial, according to German researchers who looked over data from 56 studies involving either adults or kids.

The investigators looked at a variety of health...

People who drink lots of sugar-sweetened drinks may be putting themselves at a heightened risk for kidney disease, a new study suggests.

The study of more than 3,000 black men and women in Mississippi found that those who consumed the most soda, sweetened fruit drinks and water had a 61 percent increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

That water was included in...

Getting rid of candy and chips at the supermarket checkout could lead to a dramatic reduction in junk food consumption, researchers say.

"Changing what food is displayed at checkouts seems to have an impact on what customers buy. It could also have an impact on what they eat, but we can't be sure about that," said a British team led by Jean Adams, of the University of Cambridge.

...

If you've got a sweet tooth, but you're worried about type 2 diabetes, you might want to skip sugary drinks.

New research suggests that drinking sugar-sweetened beverages, such as cola, likely boost your risk of type 2 diabetes much more than the sugar found in fruit or even 100 percent fruit juices.

"All foods are not created equal," said study author Dr. John Sievenpiper...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is getting serious about added sugars.

Acting on the health recommendation that calories from added sugars shouldn't exceed 10 percent of your daily total calories, new nutrition labels will break down a food's sugar content so you can read how much added sugar it contains.

The line for "sugars" will become "total sugars" and require th...

Caffeine-laden energy drinks are popular, but they might make your blood vessels less efficient, a small study suggests.

These drinks -- sold as Monster and Red Bull, to name two -- have been linked to heart, nerve and stomach problems, researchers say.

"A lot of young kids use energy drinks when they exercise, a time when you need your arterial function to be at its top,"...

Black Americans are at greater risk of high blood pressure than whites, and a new study suggests the "Southern" diet bears much of the blame.

Experts have long known that blacks are more likely to die of heart disease and stroke than whites -- and that rates of high blood pressure explain a lot of that disparity. But why are blacks more likely to develop high blood pressure?

U.S. kids are drinking far more water than sodas and fruit drinks, health officials say.

A new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that water accounts for almost half of kids' total beverage consumption.

And together, water and milk comprised about two-thirds of the beverages consumed by Americans aged 2 o 19 between 2013 and 2016.

...

Americans continue to fatten up, with obesity rates topping 35 percent in seven states, a new report reveals.

That's up from five states two years ago. Moreover, no state had a notable improvement in its obesity rate over the previous year, according to the report from Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, both nonprofit health policy organizations.

...

A new study suggests that colon cancer patients who regularly drink diet sodas have a much lower risk of their tumor coming back, or of dying from the cancer.

In a study funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, researchers tracked outcomes for more than 1,000 colon cancer patients. The investigators found that those who drank one or more 12-ounce servings of artificially sweetene...

People are less likely to buy sugary drinks if they see warning labels that include graphic pictures of health consequences such as obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, researchers report.

They conducted a study in the cafeteria of a hospital in Massachusetts. Three different types of labels were displayed one at a time for a few weeks near the bottled and fountain beverages. The labels...

It's well-known that Americans consume too much sugar. But that affinity for the sweet stuff starts as early as infancy, with some babies consuming added sugar that exceeds maximum levels recommended for adults, U.S. researchers report.

Eating foods with added sugar can influence a child's food choices later in life. And added sugar has been linked with obe...

Teens who were once hooked on sugary sodas may now be now turning to sugary sports drinks, a new study reveals.

While soda's popularity declines, the number of U.S. high school students who drank sports drinks at least once per week actually rose slightly, from 56 percent in 2010 to nearly 57 percent in 2015.

The good news is that, over the same period, those who drank one o...

Pregnant women may want to skip all soft drinks while they're expecting if they want their child's learning and memory skills to be sharper, new research suggests.

The study found that when moms-to-be had more sugar, especially from sugar-sweetened sodas, their children had poorer nonverbal problem-solving abilities and verbal memory. These children also had poorer global intelligenc...

Fewer U.S. kids are plagued by tooth cavities compared to just a few years ago, but income disparities persist, according to a new U.S. government study.

Researchers found that in 2015-2016, about 43 percent of children ages 2 to 19 had cavities. That was down from 50 percent four years earlier.

This is the good news. On the other hand, disparities were apparent: Hispanic ki...

Philadelphia's "soda" tax seems to be getting the results city officials wanted.

New research shows that since the city began taxing sodas, energy drinks and other sweetened beverages on Jan. 1, 2017, Philadelphians are about 40 percent less likely than residents of three nearby cities to have a soda every day. They are also 64 percent less likely to slurp down an energy drink on a da...

A common version of a gene that makes you eat more sugar also plays a role in reducing body fat, surprised researchers report.

"This goes against the current perception that eating sugar is bad for health," said study first author Timothy Frayling.

The gene may reduce body fat because the same "A" version of the FGF21 gene also results in lower protein and fat consumption.

Tempted to cheat on your diet? You might want to think twice.

Tiny tooth-mounted sensors can now provide real-time information about what you eat and drink.

The technology could prove important in health care and clinical studies, according to the Tufts University School of Engineering team that developed it.

The flexible, 2-millimeter sensors communicate wireless...

Far from trying to keep kids fit and trim, America's biggest sports leagues are actually pushing junk food at them, a new study contends.

Multimillion dollar "sponsorships" forged between professional sports organizations -- like the National Football League -- and food companies often end up marketing high-calorie foods and sugary beverages to kids, researchers reported.

Th...

Would that ice cold soda be as tempting if you knew that it might shorten your life?

New research found that adults over 45 who drank an average of 24 ounces or more of sugar-sweetened beverages every day had more than double the risk of dying from heart disease over a 6-year study period than those who averaged an ounce or less of sugar-sweetened beverages daily.

The resea...

If you worry about ever getting cancer, you might want to pass on the processed foods at your supermarket.

Every 10 percent dietary increase in packaged snacks, fizzy drinks, sugary cereals and other highly processed foods boosts the risk for cancer by 12 percent, new research suggests.

Breast cancer, in particular, was associated with greater consumption of mass-produced, u...

Fruit juice isn't doing any favors for your waistline, a new study reports.

People who drink a small glass of fruit juice daily can expect to steadily gain a bit of weight over the years, according to data from a long-term study of women's health.

It's about the same weight gain you'd expect if someone drank a similar amount of sugary soda every day, the study authors noted....

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